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Discussion Starter #1
I'm reposting this from my myspace blog:<br><br>
UGH. What a hard test! But not in the traditional sense. I had studied things like exact amounts of vitamins and precise antibiotic doses and such... nothing like that on the test. No percentages, no need to know the names of extremely rare diseases. Just a bunch of trying to guess what is in the head of the person who wrote the question. I am not allowed to repeat actual test questions, but I am just going to approximate what I'm talking about with original examples.<br><br>
Here's one "example."<br><br>
A client reports that she hasn't felt her baby move in over 24 hours. What should you do FIRST?<br><br>
1. Check the baby's heartbeat<br>
2. Check the baby's position<br>
3. Have her lie down<br>
4. Consult her chart<br><br>
Well, your gut instinct is to say, "Whoa, check that baby's heartbeat now!" And there it is, option number one, easy, huh? But then you go to option 2. Technically, you HAVE to check the baby's position before you try to hear the heart, so you know where to put your fetoscope. (You're never going to hear anything if you're listening over part of her belly where the baby isn't even lying.) So B has to happen before A, chronologically, and the question did ask what to do first, not what was most important. Then you get to C, and it is true, you're going to have her lie down first, then check position, then listen to the heartbeat. So I guess it is C. But then option 4 is consult her chart. Well... maybe she's only 18 weeks pregnant! If that's the case, it is totally normal for her not to feel the baby move for over a day, and you can reassure her. Also, you know that you might not even be able to hear the heartbeat with a fetoscope at 18 weeks, so you don't waste a lot of time trying and worrying the mother. And if she has reported this to you over the phone, of course you're going to consult her chart while you're waiting for her to get to you, or when you're on your way to her sitting at a red light. Hmmmm.... any of them COULD be right depending on how you look at it and the exact circumstances. And none of them seem AS right as 1, but that really isn't what you do FIRST.<br><br>
Here's another "example":<br><br>
A woman is anemic. What foods do you recommend?<br><br>
1. Celery, lettuce, beets, raisins, and corn<br>
2. Chard, hawthorn, malt-o-meal, bananas, and kiwi<br>
3. Beans, orange juice, rose hips, chamomile tea, and carrots<br>
4. Cauliflower, cabbage, tomatoes, whole wheat bread, and berries<br><br>
OOOOOOOhkeay..... the first question that pops into my mind... WHERE'S THE BEEF? (And I'm not even old enough to remember that commercial.) Are we ALL freakin' vegetarians all of a sudden? I'm not recommending any of that $h!+. I'm telling her to get herself some organic beef and get some Floradix. But let's deal with what we have here. OK, beans, they're supposed to be good for iron. And the vitamin C in the OJ will help her absorb that iron. So 3 is looking good. But... chamomile tea?!? Carrots? That can't be it. And what are Rose Hips? They were on the test at least twice! (off to wikipedia I go...) OK, I remember reading that dried fruits are high in iron. Raisins (in option 1) are dried fruit. But the rest of that list is ridiculous, right? Hmmm. Chard? Are leafy greens high in iron? I'm not sure... I know they have calcium, maybe they have iron too... malt-o-meal is probably fortified... but hawthorn, well, first that's an herb, not a food, and I don't think it has any iron. Kiwi has the vit. C, but what does banana have to do w/ iron? Nothing. OK, last option, berries and tomatoes have Vit. C, and the bread might be fortified w/ iron, but cabbage and cauliflower? I don't think so... but I could be wrong! Why oh why didn't I spend days studying all the foods that could possibly have iron?!? I mean, if I happen to have an anemic vegetarian client who won't take Floradix, I don't suppose there's any way I could look up her options at that time. (ha ha.)<br><br>
(Now I suppose that if I knew a lot about iron in foods, the question wouldn't have seemed so ridiculous... but I honestly thought I knew enough about foods w/ iron, when I clearly did not, at least for this test.)<br><br>
Can you imagine 350 questions like that? This test plays with your head, man!!!<br><br>
I don't know if I passed or failed. I really, really don't have a sense of how I did. I should have the results in 2-4 weeks.<br><br>
postscript: I have discovered that Rose Hips are an excellent source of vitamin C. This is good news, because I think that's what I guessed on the test for one question. For some reason Rose Hips just sounded high in C to me.
 

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If it's like that, I'm doomed to fail. You know those multiple choice tests for English lit when you're supposed to explain what the author really meant? I bombed those and this sounds like it.<br><br>
Are there any practice NARMs out there, like for SATs or MCATs or LSATs?<br><br>
ETA: What school did you attend? or just self-study? Curious to see how you were prepped?
 

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I haven't found a study guide for narm like for other tests. When I took my nursing test and my IBCLC (which is a very hard test, imho), I had study guides, that's really the best way for me to study, to practice the tests and then if I get it wrong, go back and study that part.<br><br>
that way I don't spend all my time on stuff I already know, I am familiar with how to take the test, etc.<br><br>
I do wish there was something, maybe someone (maybe me, but who has the time) should do a study guide?<br><br>
for those enrolled in formal programs, do they include study guides or help? Our nursing program i teach at, has a great study class on how to take the test, does practice questions, goes over the major things to study and has flash cards.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There's no study guide that I've been able to find. There are some NARM-prep flash cards out there which I ordered, but I would not recommend them. I think they mostly wasted my time, to be honest, and I will be returning them for a refund.<br><br>
I went to the International School of Midwifery in Miami, a 3-year program. We did not have a NARM prep class or guide or anything. (We did get to hear some really "helpful" rants about what a ridiculous test the NARM is.)<br><br>
I think the MOST helpful thing I did (and maybe I flunked, so don't necessarily listen to me yet) was to basically memorize Heart and Hands. I literally outlined the whole book, memorized the protocols for things like face and breech, etc. But there were definitely things on the test that were not covered in H&H, so it isn't really enough.
 

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Yikes! And I was so excited to receive my flashcards in the mail today! So, H&Hs, uh? Nutrition. Good grief, I'm going to be in the same boat as you in August. I always overthink questions and my train of thought would have been exactly like yours in your sample question. I can always think of a circumstance where more than one answer may be applicable. You know we always focus on the questions that stumped us after the fact. I'm sure you did well.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/fingersx.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="fingersx">:
 

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Hi<br><br>
Just had a quick read.and wanted to also put quick reply on. This was my 2nd attempt at NARM. I have to say the PM test was way harder this year. I had lots of long scenarios with 3 or 4 questions linked to each.<br><br>
Same thing though....there was always at least 2 things I would do, but trying to think which they would do first was hard, and then of course if I was going down the wrong line of thinking, I am likely to get all answers related to that scenario wrong!!!<br><br>
Yes, feel very frustrated with it, and will await to see result, but felt more confident last time and missed by couple points...so who knows!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I didn't get many linked scenarios. Only about 3 or so. I bet there's a first-timers test and a 1st retake test, 2nd retake test, and so on and so forth. (Then again... maybe not. What do I know.)<br><br>
About the flashcards... maybe they will be good for you. I just don't think they helped me. I think you'll know after you use them for a few hours. The flashcards I made myself going through H&H were much more helpful. If I have to retake, I'm going to go through Frye's Vol I and II and make thousands of flash cards on everything I don't know.
 

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i just wanted to chime in that i hated the NARM test. i was convinced i failed it, and i was a good midiwfery student with plenty of clinical experience when i took it. i agree, so many questions are bogus, with many good answers. sometimes a "best" answer depends on your experience level, or where you are practicing. i felt like the test questions were often wanting me to choose between being borderline reckless and too conservative/transferring unnecessarily. awful test.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momileigh</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10612943"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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... chamomile tea?!? Carrots? That can't be it. And what are Rose Hips? They were on the test at least twice! (off to wikipedia I go...)</div>
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And that's one of my very specific complaints about the test. It assumes that herbs are a standard part of midwifery practice, and it is not and should not be. Herbalism is an entirely separate discipline, and a midwife should have specific studies before she is considered competent to recommend them (and I say this as an herbalist who knows I got the questions right).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momileigh</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10612943"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
4. Consult her chart<br><br>
4. Cauliflower, cabbage, tomatoes, whole wheat bread, and berries<br><br>
Can you imagine 350 questions like that? This test plays with your head, man!!!<br></div>
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If you have finished midwifery school and don't pass that test, there is NO hope for the rest of us! LOL! PS, those are my guesses on your "questions". Yikes, guess I have to read more. I bet you passed it with flying colors...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> three of my friends did last year, and one of them was sure she had failed it....I bet you did fine.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: I don't think I ever want to take that test. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:
 

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Thank you so much for this post!! As a newbie midwifery student, it's nice to know a little about what lies ahead. The NARM isn't like the SAT/ACT in high school where you commonly run into others who have taken it to get study tips. So it's nice to have this little discussion going so we know a little about the line of thinking to be prepared for.<br><br>
Best of luck to you momileigh!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>busybusymomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10617525"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: I don't think I ever want to take that test. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:</div>
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And I don't ever want to retake it!!!<br><br>
I reeeeeeeeally hope I passed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nashvillemidwife</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10621004"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So... in what ways do you wish your education had better prepared you for the test?</div>
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That is a VERY GOOD QUESTION. I'm hard-pressed to answer it. I mean, going back to my "sample" questions... how do you STUDY for a test like that?!? How can any school prepare you for those kinds of questions?<br><br>
I guess I could have known a little more about nutrition. Instead of lists of 6 foods with whatever nutrient, I should have known lists of 20 foods per nutrient. I feel like I know a LOT about birth control, but the questions they chose to ask were not ones I knew the answers to. (I feel that's unfair... I'm practically a walking birth control encyclopedia, I could probably write a fair-sized book about it, and I didn't know the info they wanted... why ask such esoteric questions?) One other area I might have felt weak was that I think I'm better at questions that detect or prevent complications than I am at questions on how to handle them once they occur. Not emergency-type complications, more like, hmmm.... managing someone w/ diabetes, or something like that.<br><br>
There was one question about preeclampsia where I wrote something like the following on the comment sheet: "I think Elizabeth Davis would choose answer A and Anne Frye would choose answer D. Because Davis comes before Frye on your list of resources, I went with A." I think Davis comes before Frye because D comes before F, but I had to choose somehow. Once again, how do you prepare for this test?!?<br><br>
So I came out of it not really feeling like there were huge gaps in my education. One of the questions in particular was WAY out in the perinatology field, and I just can't say that I think it was my school's job to educate me on something so far outside the scope of practice of any midwife.<br><br>
So maybe I did ok. I'll let you know.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momileigh</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10622642"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">One of the questions in particular was WAY out in the perinatology field, and I just can't say that I think it was my school's job to educate me on something so far outside the scope of practice of any midwife.</div>
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Amen to that. There were several questions where I just stared at the paper and thought "the most appropriate answer to this question is to refer them to someone who should know the answer!" I have a very broad knowledge base from having work experience all over the map in women's health & baby care so I knew the answers to most of those questions but still recognize they shouldn't be core competencies in CPM practice. If they're going to expand the scope of what CPMs should know that's not relevant to every day practice, there are a lot more practical subjects to learn before the ones I saw on the test.
 

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I'm nauseated just reading your post!<br><br>
I'm a nursing student and every one of our questions on our tests are like this... you wonder what sort of crazy person would write questions like that. If they want you to choose the best answer, why not OFFER the best answer as an option!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/censored.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="censored"><br><br>
They act like you're attending births in the trunk of a car.<br><br><i>A mother is in the 2nd stage of labor and the baby begins to crown, which of the following would be an appropriate action:<br><br>
A. Sterilize your crowbar.<br>
B. Prop the mother against the spare tire.<br>
C. Attempt to unlock the truck from the inside.<br>
D. Whistle Dixie.</i><br><br>
Well gee, they're all such good answers... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch">
 

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I wouldn't quite compare the NARM exam to the NCLEX. Yes, the NCLEX will give you several correct answers and you need to prioritize to choose the right one; that tests your critical thinking skills in addition to your knowledge of the subject and that's something you want in an RN. However, with the NCLEX there is always a scientific rationale why the correct answer is the best one. With the NARM I felt there were questions where the possible choices boiled down to judgment calls; different midwives might choose to do different things and there's no way to quantify the "rightness" of one answer over another.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moodyred01</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10629113"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br><i>A mother is in the 2nd stage of labor and the baby begins to crown, which of the following would be an appropriate action:<br><br>
A. Sterilize your crowbar.<br>
B. Prop the mother against the spare tire.<br>
C. Attempt to unlock the truck from the inside.<br>
D. Whistle Dixie.</i><br></div>
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I narrow it down to B versus D, and go w/ B.
 
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