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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,<br>
Unfortunately my asthma has gotten worse with my pregnancy (29 weeks currently) and my doctor has recommended I use a nebulizer with ventolin medication twice a day.<br><br>
I know that using the Ventolin inhaler a couple times a day is okay, but is using a nebulizer a couple of times a day okay as well? I am just worried because it is a lot more ventolin than just a couple of puffs.<br><br>
Thanks so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
bump please - thank you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Hi there mama,<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
I have asthma, too, and you NEED to do whatever your doctor tells you to make sure you can breathe. I was on Advair 250/50 twice a day, plus Singulair, plus Albuterol inhaler when I needed it during my pregnancy. Still am, while nursing for the past 11 months. You HAVE to be able to breathe to get oxygen to your baby. That is the MOST important thing.<br><br>
Because the inhalers or nebulizers go right to your lungs, it is safer to do than take something orally. Go ahead. You NEED to do this. Baby will be fine. It's better for baby to be exposed to some of this stuff than to not get enough oxygen or to feel your panic if you can't breathe. Do what you need to.<br><br>
The nebulizer just gives you the same amount of ventolin as your inhaler, it's just a different delivery method. It's perfectly fine. You should also consider a preventative, though, like Singulair, or Advair or Intal. It will lessen the need for Ventolin.<br><br>
Feel better, and breathe easy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks mom0810 - your words are reassuring, and I really appreciate your posting. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I also have asthma and I agree, it's more important for babe to get enough oxygen than get exposed to a little bit of meds. Not enough oxygen WILL cause problems, med exposure might cause problems.<br><br>
I took advair throughout pg/nursing as well as albuterol w/no known problems.
 

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I agree, you need to get air. I would also recommend, however, that you explore whatever food allergies/intolerances might be causing your asthma to act up, because your child may develop the same problems, or at least have some dietary reactions, from your body's constantly fighting the foods in your system. For me, if I have dairy (cow's milk, anyway), I will get immediate chest pains, even just a little bit. I didn't know this during my pregnancy, having only discovered it after eliminating it to deal with my son's issues (mild reflux, thrush, g.i. problems). I wish someone had suggested I do an allergy elimination diet then. Sigh. Or even better before I became pregnant. Now, I have a son with major issues with dairy, wheat, corn, soy, almonds, grapes, and citrus.<br>
Anyway, take care of yourself, mama.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"> Your friendly neighborhood respiratory therapist here;<br><br>
I concur with mom0810; a nebulizer treatment of ventolin (aka albuterol) will give you the equivilent of 4 puffs of your inhaler. It's just diluted with saline solution to stretch the treatment out longer, the idea being that you open your airways a little more each breath.<br><br>
A lot of women find that with pregnancy their asthma gets either a lot better or a lot worse; same with adolescence. Something about all those great hormones!<br><br>
I also agree with pp's who recommended maintenance drugs like advair; many times you might be so accustomed to being slightly hypoxic you wouldn't realize it. If it's not shorting your baby on oxygen it's definately making your heart work harder than it should. I also agree that trying to figure out what triggers you is worth investigating, whether it's food sensitivities or environmental allergens. Kick the cat out of your bedroom and get your dp or a friend to do a thorough dusting while you're OUT of the house sometime.
 

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Anything this asthmatic momma might've said has been covered.<br><br>
Be Well, and breathe deeply, for both you and your baby.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 
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