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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
He's 2 1/2 and was diagnosed with Leukemia on Tuesday. He's already had his first round of chemo yesterday. She's a friend from work. I've been asked by my manager to coordinate a collection to send them something but I'm at a loss as to what to send. I know the President of the company is sending balloons and bears and I personally send a build a bear, I don't want to send him another stuffed animal. Any ideas? If you could spare some "positive thoughts" for him, that would be great. Thanks.
 

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I'm so sorry, everytime I hear about something like this, I can't help to imagine myself in that situation, and how those are truly the hardest moments in the life of a mother.<br>
I pray for the little boy, and for his mother to have the strength to get through this.<br><br>
It's so unfair that innocent little children have to go through such hard situations....<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">'s to you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After posting, I realized this may not be the best forum for this. I tried to delete it but I don't see that option. If it needs to be moved, please do so. Thanks.
 

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Oh, that is so sad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/heartbeat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="heartbeat"> I hope everything works out ok.<br>
Gifts that might be appropriate would be things that would help a little person when he's feeling really sick and horrible, maybe some good storybooks, both funny and reassuring, or gentle music, some nutritious snacks (for his parents as much as him) to help supplement the hospital food.
 

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I would send GC's to restaurants that have take-out food. It's not personal, but it's really useful and I think they will appreciate it a lot more.
 

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I like the idea of books for him to read, and also coloring and activity books. Nothing takes a little ones mind off his troubles like a good activity, and if he is having chemo he will probably be feeling to ill to be up doing much else. other good things could be puzzles or lego sets if he likes either of those. I will light a candle for him tonight.
 

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puzzles or activity books or small toys that he can play with while in bed.<br>
Maybe one of theose bed trays so he can stay in bed, but have a surface to play on?<br><br>
or a lap table for drawing? I think crayola sells a lap table for travel....<br><br>
I am sorry to hear this news. I always get sad when small children get sick
 

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Things that will help facilitate mom staying with little boy, and little boy being distracted from being sick, will be great. Some of these ides might not be "AP" but whatever you think might be helpful at this difficult time, please consider it!<br><br>
* some videos for little guy to watch, games to play, art supplies, etc.<br>
* Gather monetary donations to help the family... if there are issues related to having to miss work to care for the little guy, the financial help will mean a lot.<br>
* Get a couple of people together and do some freezer cooking for the family, stuff they can take out of the freezer and throw into the oven without having to worry about it.<br>
* Little things like funny shirts, hats, socks, pictures, posters, gadgets- little kids love that stuff and it helps keep spirits up.<br>
* Chances are good that if baby is "happy" (what a hard word to use in this situation", it will ease mom and dad's mind a lot.<br>
* If any of you know the family well enough, could someone come in and hang out with the little guy to give mom and dad some respite to shower, sleep?<br>
* Give them information on support groups or other resources in the area for families dealing with this situation.<br>
* Is she breastfeeding? Give her as much support with that as possible.<br>
* Don't alienate yourself from her. Families need support the most when they don't have the time or energy to ask for it... be open to their boundaries, respect their space but above all else, don't abandon them after the gifts have been given. Open your heart and ears to listen and cry and celebrate and grieve... be human and confused and scared with them. They won't want answers from you, just your human presence.<br><br>
Just try to imagine yourself in that mother's shoes.. what things would mean the most to you? I know if I had someone who could step in and help with little things like running errands or getting dinner going would be tremendously helpful. Maybe if you can gather enough $, a cleaning service might be helpful.<br><br>
And pray pray pray to whomever you pray to... it really does matter!<br><br>
Good luck...
 

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He is 2 1/2 and going through chemo. hmmm he may or may not be feeling very poorly. They have gotten much better at chemo drugs and premedications in recent years (first hand expereince). I would focus on something that supports the parents, like Khris said GC for take out restaurants or something. He will probably get most comfort from his well known and loved toys that he owns. You know his favorite snuggli or whatever. So I wouldn't focus alot on toys. I think gathering donations is an awesome way of supporting the family. It is almost always difficult financially when someone is that sick. I agree that being an ear to listen, offering to run errands and if you know them well enough and they need it that offering to watch the other kids (if they have them) would be great.
 

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Dynamicdoula said it all. All of her suggestions are so right on. I have been there. My son was diagnosed with aplastic anemia (bone marrow failure) at 15 months and spent 9 days in childrens hospital. Just drawing from my own experience, there is a lot of downtime, where t.v and videos are a lifesaver. Interacive toys, like puzzles, games and books make all the difference. If they are in a childrens hospital there may be a playroom, but it would most likely be closed on the weekend, so the toys and games they have in there room may be the only things they have to do. There is also the possibility that they may not be able to leave the room depending on his blood counts, so again, things to do and play with will make all the difference. The only other thing I can think of that helped us feel like people cared, and I think made other people feel useful was donating blood. All the people at my husbands work came to the hospital and donated blood. That might be something to think about. You could also remind people to register to be a bone marrow doner. These are the times and situations that remind us that we have the ability to save lives. Donate blood. Be a bone marrow doner.<br><br><br>
Kristen mom to<br>
Aiden 01-01-02<br>
Regan 05-29-04
 

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So sorry to hear this. A hospital bag for parents might be nice... I've done this before. Inexpensive bag filled with travel tolietries, little snacks, tissues, gum, crossword puzzles, change for vending machines, etc. I'll keep your friends and their child in my prayers.
 

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Everything everyone else has already said!<br><br>
Also, I don't know how close you are with this friend, but I would make sure to give a call and just 'check in' with her on a regular basis...let her know you are thinking about her, give her an opportunity to ask you for some kind of specific help. It is sometimes hard to know what people need specifically during a crisis. I think there is a tendency for people to really rally around a crisis when the news first breaks...and then when the dust settles, the immediacy of the situation (from an outsider's point of view) goes down a bit and I think that's when the family can be most vulnerable. Not just now, but down the road, call her up and ask if she wants to go have a coffee with you. Ask her if she needs you to watch her kids while she goes and does something good for herself for an hour, get a haircut or whatever.<br><br>
I'm so sad for this child and family...I'm hoping and praying for the best possible outcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions. I tried to call the hospital room yesterday but there was no answer. Another lady at work here did hear from her yesterday and she told her that she would really like some Pepsi. She said the hospital food is really expensive. So I'm making a list of snack foods that I know that she likes and am going to take them up there tomorrow along with a gift basket for the Ds that my department is putting together.
 
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