Mothering Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I started back to work last week. I'm able to pump 9 oz while I'm there which seems to be enough for while I'm away: 3 bottles at 3 oz each. I feed at home before I leave for work and my mom gives her a bottle 2-3 hours before I get home. I also pump for the last time at work 2-3 hours before I get home so we can be in sync. But, we're having a major problem.

She nurses a bit when I get home. It doesn't seem like she's really doing much but nuzzling. Then she'll nurse again around 8 pm but she's never satisfied. I have had to give her bottles several times to satisfy her and my frozen stash is basically gone. I don't know if these are supply issues, nipple issues, or what?? She'll wake up in the night and nurse without issue and nurses heavily in the morning before I leave.

We use the slow-flow nipples, my mom stops and burps her in the middle of feedings to slow it down, we've timed things out accordingly. I don't know what else to do or what's even going on. Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,391 Posts
Just a thought, but since she's not nursing well during that feeding, have you considered pumping one breast while she nurses from the other? That would help you rebuild your supply a bit.

Also, I don't know that I would offer her the bottle at home. I would slowly wean off of it, gradually using less and less pumped milk each time in the bottle.

One other thing, she could be still adjusting to your new schedule and wants cuddle time more - you may even notice an upsiwn in the frequency she night nurses.

Just another quick thought - does she seem a little "lazy" at the breast? For instance, maybe she doesn't want to "work" to get the milk (the bottle is easier to get milk from than the breast.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
She is definitely nursing more at night. She was sleeping through the night before I went back to work and now she wakes up 1-2 times a night. It's fine with me. I was hoping she would reverse cycle.

I like your suggestion about weaning slowly from the bottles at home and pumping while nursing. I'll definitely try that. I was worried that my body was stopping production due to lack of demand in those late evening hours but am not even sure if that's possible. I know there's a supply and demand relationship but can our bodies be so precise as to know what time of day to have lower production? I just wish I could be home feeding her. This is driving me nuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
A lot of women find that they have to create kind of an artificial oversupply when they're working and pumping. Although I had always produced more than enough milk for my daughter (5.5 months), it was rough when my supply dropped even a little. I wasn't able to pump enough to match what she was eating while I was away from her, even though (even with the supply drops) there would have been enough milk if she had nursed.

I found it necessary to pump more often as well as to include extra dietary galactogogues in my diet. I had my partner make granola with oats, sesame seeds, and barley syrup (all galactogogues) along with whatever was necessary to make it yummy. I made a point of eating more regularly throughout the day and drinking at least half a liter of water every time I pumped.

To save time with each pumping, I only rinse my pump parts at the end of the day. Prior to that, I shake all the big drops of milk into a bottle and stick everything in my cooler in the refrigerator.

What kind of a pump are you using? How many letdowns do you have, and how long are you pumping?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never heard of galactogogues. I'll have learn about that. As for water, I'm trying to drink water all day long. I use a Medela Pump in Style, but it's old so I'm thinking of getting a new one.

I pump for 20-30 minutes but I'm not really sure what constitutes a let down. The milk flows real nice for a few minutes, then it slows down, then it turns into drops. I let it do the drop thing for a minute or so then readjust the pump on the same breast while doing massage and squeezing. Then, I do the other breast-same routine. Once this is done, I go back to the first breast to get what may be in there, then back to opposite. At this second round, I don't get much, probably .25 oz, but every little bit helps. Then, I close up shop.

I definitely think I need to pump more often. I think I'll order more parts so I don't have to wash and wash and wash. I have another question, what's artifical oversupply? I had 30 oz. of frozen milk but, I'm down to only 5 oz. Things aren't going as smoothly as I had hoped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,150 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by corhorvath

She nurses a bit when I get home. It doesn't seem like she's really doing much but nuzzling. Then she'll nurse again around 8 pm but she's never satisfied. I have had to give her bottles several times to satisfy her and my frozen stash is basically gone. I don't know if these are supply issues, nipple issues, or what?? She'll wake up in the night and nurse without issue and nurses heavily in the morning before I leave.

Why don't you think she is satisfied? Is she crying or is it that she nurses frequently? My DD nursed non stop from the minute I got home. She nursed every hour sometimes for two hours straight and she nursed all night long. Cluster feeding is common in a reverse cycle baby. DD is still a heavy night nurser and she has been a reverse cycler always.

It is also possible from the nuzzling you discribed she may be confused on how to nurse properly. This happened with Marah Jade the first time she took a bottle. I had to retrain her how to latch. She would only take one bottle a day at max and abandoned them totally at 6 months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,150 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by corhorvath
I was worried that my body was stopping production
You would notice a decrease in your pumping as well if this were true. I think it would take longer than a week to drop production significantly.

Quote:
I know there's a supply and demand relationship but can our bodies be so precise as to know what time of day to have lower production?
Your breasts do know the difference. They are amazingly trainable. Night time milk has a higher fat content than day time milk as an example. Your breasts make milk in two ways, anticipatory and on demand. If your breasts don't get the stimulation to make milk at that time they will stop and if it continues they will decide not to make as much on demand. I used to make my DD nurse every hour if she didn't initiate it. I would even rustle her in her sleep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
I went back to work two weeks ago and have been having some of the same issues. It was very frustrating that first week! It is hard enough to go back and think all day about how you'd rather be nursing than pumping and then you come home and your baby isn't interested.
Hang in there with it!
I think that in my daughter's case she has a preference for the bottle because the milk flows easier and faster. I was trying to time my pumping throughout the day with her feedings and then I would get home and she wouldn't be interested. I was worried about my supply decreasing and so I have been pumping in the evening or pumping one side while feeding her on the other. This past week (my second week back) she seemed to get the idea that she was only gonna get the breast when I am around and has been nursing better. I have still been occasionally pumping one side while she nurses the other just to get my emergency stash increased. I am hoping that the routine works itself out; I remember having this problem as well with my oldest daughter and everything did get better eventually. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! This has been extremely helpful.

Laurel, you made me laugh.

Lyttlewon:
"Why don't you think she is satisfied? Is she crying or is it that she nurses frequently?"
--Well, because she gives me indications that she wants to eat then when I try, she latches on for a few seconds (5 to10) and then pulls off and screams. She has two different distinct cries, one is patient, she's telling me she needs something and will let me figure it out; two is post-patience--she's waited long enough and is hysterical. When I try to nurse and it seems like nothing's happening, she screams. BUT, I never tried pumping while my husband feeds to really see if milk was available or not.
"Your breasts do know the difference. They are amazingly trainable. Night time milk has a higher fat content than day time milk as an example. "
--This is just so fascinating to me. Our bodies are truly amazing.

NameThatMama:
Yesterday, you asked about let-downs. In the next pumping session, after my milk turned to drop-lets, rather than removing the pump after a minute or so, I left it on. To my extreme surprise and delight, another ounce was pumped!! I guess this may indicate a second let-down. I don't really know, I just know this has never happened before. Plus, last night I let my daugher nurse and nurse and nurse until I was so sore I had to remove her to try to rev-up the night time production.

**Thank you for all of your information and advice. With my first child, I gave up because I had no idea what to do and things just weren't working out and after 5 months, I threw in the towel. This message has truly saved me in several different instances and I know we can make to at least one year.**
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Quote:
what's artifical oversupply?
Artificial oversupply means working to increase your supply higher than you would need if you were nursing instead of pumping/nursing. A natural oversupply is more milk than necessary to feed your baby, and artificial oversupply means that you made it that way on purpose. Does that make sense?

I might not be reading this right, but are you only pumping one side at a time? If that's the case, you might have more luck pumping both breasts at one time. Pumping both breasts will make it easier to stimulate a letdown, and you'll get more milk that way. You might also consider pumping on the other side when you nurse in the morning--your daughter will stimulate a letdown, and you'll pump far more on the other side. Like the PP mentioned, you should *definitely* pump when your daughter is being fed a bottle.

Do you have the Medela with the 2-phase system? If not, you can sort of simulate it with the suction and speed dials. Turn the speed up (faster) and the suction down (min.) until the amount of milk coming out of your breasts increases. Then crank up the suction and lower the motor speed to your prefered setting.

Ways to increase letdown/pumping output: warm room, cold water to drink, think about your baby or think about something other than how to get more milk out of your breasts (stress inhibits letdown).

Keep us posted on how it's working for you.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top