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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey ladies! I just decided I want to learn to
Do you have any advise as to where to start, what to buy, etc? My Mom said she can knit and purl and is going to show me on Thurs. but I'd also like to find other resources. She hasn't done a lot of knitting and hasn't done any in years so I think we could both use some guidance. Thanks so much!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·


I ran out and bought Stitch and Bitch and read the first 30 pages
I'm right up to where it teaches you to cast on. I figure I'll bring it to my Mom's on Thursday and I'll have it in case we need some help


I'm so excited!!! I can't wait to start making cute things for my DD
girl:

Just curious how long does it take (or did it take you) to get good at it? I'm not expecting to make a sweater next weekend or even next month, but just wondering what a realistic time frame is for getting fairly good at it. Thanks again.
 

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Honestly, knitting is very easy to learn, but a little harder to get good at. Practice practice practice! It's hard to say how long, but never super long. Make a few dishcloths, maybe a scarf, and you should be ready for something you'll actually want to wear LOL. I only started 2 months ago (although I learned when I was little) and I am churning things out! The beginner projects in SnB are great!

A few tips I wish someone had told me:

1) The first 1-3 rows are the hardest, so don't give up! It gets much easier after that. If someone who is a good knitter can cast on for you, all the better... new knitters tend to cast on very tightly and make it hard to knit.

2) Don't think because you are new you should use cheap [email protected] yarn-- it is harder to knit with! Get something soft with some wool mixed in (if not 100% wool) and some BIG needles (I started with Landscapes and #15's) so you can see progress right away.

3) Felted projects hide your mistakes! Try a felted bag or something as your first big project and you won't have to obsess over each stitch.

4) Do not even ATTEMPT purling until you have the knit down pat. Do 500 rows of garter if you have to, but if you try to learn both at once you will confuse yourself and get frustrated.

5) HAVE FUN!!! Knitting should be relaxing and stress relieving.

Welcome to a wonderful addiction.. I mean hobby!
 

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Just wanted to chip in & say that I'm teaching myself to knit from the SnB handbook & it's really working well for me. The instructions & illustrations are really clear & easy to follow, and I
the various knitting projects!

OT - I've finally figured out how to do rib stitch! As it turns out, I was doing it right all along, I just didn't realize it and was unravelling what I had knit before I could see clearly that what was coming out *was* rib stitch.
: So now I'm going to try knitting Ian a pair of socks.
 

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Once you learn the basics, I like Knitty's Techniques with Theresa's explanations. Her explanations of kitchener stitch and matress stitch were the most helpful to me in figuring out these techniques. She also has a good explanation of frogging (undoing your work):

http://knitty.com/archive.html

Scroll way down to the bottom to the Techniques with Theresa section.

Have fun--I am a newbie too!

edit: just thought of one more thing. I second the recommendation to get wool yarn. Lion's Brand Fisherman's is not too expensive. I got it at JoAnn's or Ben Franklin or some place like that. I also like bamboo needles--less slippery than aluminum. And if you have small children, I like circulars (2 short needles connected by a plastic cable) better than straight needles because there is less for them to grab at. Though people get them to knit in the round, you can knit flat items with these just fine. Also, get light colored yarn. This is probably more important than anything else I have said. I think it's much harder to pick out what's going on with the stitches with dark colored yarn. Another option would be to pick a yarn that's variagated. I did one project with variagated yarn and the different colors helped me see the mechanics of how the stitches form better (I used red heart
: which is an acrylic that costs like $2.19 a skein--I think it would be fine for something like a potholder, but I don't recommend it for garments. I made a soaker with it and I don't like how rough it feels. If I try another soaker with acrylic yarn I want to try one of those that is at least 20% wool).

OT:
jaye_p, i'm glad you got your ribbing situation worked out! Those first few rows of ribbing do look wonky, don't they?
 
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