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So far I have been a pretty crappy dog parent.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: ..I got my Aussie Jax for my 18th birthday, he will be 5 years old on August 1st. All he knows how to do is sit and not consistently or for an extended time. Now in my defense on this part, I didn't have my driver's license and the nearest puppy classes were 30 minutes away and I paid for them relying on my Mom to drive us there. She took me to 1 class and she got tired of driving me...Since then I have just been so overwhelmed with other stuff that his training got sidelined and I realize I am a horrible person for this.<br><br>
Well, now I am moving in 13 days and since I no longer work I have all the time in the world to work with him....but where do I even start?? He's pretty much house broken, but does have his accidents mostly because the other dogs here at my parents house go inside...one isn't housebroken at all, the other is soo old she can barely make it outside.<br><br>
I am trying to make this right, really I am. He's a great dog, so sweet and I know he is really smart and totally food motivated. He's just got some problems that being a first time dog owner I didn't know anything about and my parents obivously aren't the greatest owners either.<br><br>
I just want to get him trained before DH comes home this fall, I am not expecting major changes, just to get him to sit, stay and lay down oh and to not bark so much....I didn't realize how much until I just typed it.<br><br>
Please don't flame me for being an idiot, I am trying my best with what I have been taught and I am trying to change. I just need help. If I could go to a basic training class again I would, but I am moving to the middle of nowhere to a town of less than 600 people. I have spent the last couple of days checking for something and there isn't anything within an hours drive.<br><br>
Please Help. TIA!
 

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Head for the local library or bookstore and get some training books. People seem to like the Monks of New Skete book. You're not such a bad dogparent! Better late than never, right? Just be consistent - Aussies are a handful (as you probably know) but they are highly trainable. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Good luck!
 

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Kudos to you! If you just adopted a 5 year old dog you wouldn't not train him, right? So there's no reason that you and Jax can't start today either!!<br><br>
My favorite book with regards to dogs and training is "Bones Would Rain From The Sky" by Suzanne Clothier, I also like "The Other End Of The Leash" by Pat McConnell.<br><br>
You need to establish that you are the leader. Pat M. suggests that you can accomplish this quickly by preparing your dog's food (he should be eating 1x per day and NOT free feeding) and calling him to the place that he eats (he most likely will be in there already!) and then you hold the bowl (or whatever you use to feed him) and you "eat" from the bowl. A few stragtegically placed crackers (up your sleeve, hidden in your hand - how you do it is not important, just make sure he thinks you are taking from his bowl), then make a big deal of eating "your" food. Ask him to sit and to stay seated even when you put the food on the ground and only let him eat when you say "eat". This can be challenging but using your hand on his chest to gently keep him from eating and as soon as his bum hits the ground, tell him "good sit" and then "eat". Work up to him lying down and waiting for an extended period before he gets the "eat" command.<br><br>
Work with him several times a day for short periods and constantly reinforce the command you are working on. Put him on a leash - even in the house - for these training sessions. Ask him to sit, ask only 1x, and if he doesn't sit put your hand on his back (right above his tail) and he will most likely sit. Come down to his level (stoop, squat, whatever - this will keep him from wanting to come to your level and coming out of the command) and praise - silly happy voice, big smile, and tiny treat. Make sure your verbal praise is "good ______" so that it reinforces the command.<br><br>
I think working on sit, down, stay and eat is enough for now! Don't forget to "train" even when you aren't in a formal session. Does Jax bring the ball to you when he wants play? If so, take the ball (or toy) and ask him to sit and once he does then throw it. Each time he brings it back you can ask him to sit or down and then work in a stay too. Look at your interaction with him as an opportunity to train. It doesn't have to be authoritarian but there is always an opportunity - if Jax is allowed on the furniture then ask him to sit and then invite him up. If the phone rings, etc... ask him to get off and help him off if he needs it and then praise like mad when he does.<br><br>
Find your low growly voice and hard eyes and your goofy happy voice and soft eyes and incorporate those all the time - eventually you will end up with a dog that responds to voice/eyes very quickly! Try to remember to only give the command once and then give lots of reinforcement with your goofy voice! Don't yell - they typically take that as a you are off kilter and leaders are not off kilter!
 

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First of all, quit beating yourself up!! You don't sound like such a bad dog-mom to me! Just one that needs some guidance in how to train her baby. No harm in that and it can be done at age 5! Much different than you saying "I never took the time to work with my dog and now he is a pain in the a** and I need to get rid of him". That's what I expected when you asked not to be flamed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I was so relieved to see that it was just that you needed training help. Christyb had some great suggestions and I also highly suggest training books. There are many great ones out there and might be one specifically for aussies. Check out your library!<br><br>
Definitely better late than never!! Good luck to ya!!
 

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I'm going to have to rely on amazon.com and such because there is no library in the town I am moving to. Plus the nearest town is about 20 miles away.<br><br>
Yes, he does bring the ball back and I usually have him sit, he doesn't always stay in the sit though. I've been trying but its like once he gets back in this house he looses it all, I think it might be that we have too many people living here and he is confused on who is in charge.<br><br>
I will probably start actively training once I get out to my new place, just because starting a program right now along with the packing and organizing of stuff is gonna be too much on me and probably make me a lot grumpier towards my dog and I really don't think that's a good way to start...I could be wrong though.
 

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Get a clicker ($1-2 at Petsmart or online) and do some googling on clicker training. Specifically "charging the clicker" to get your dog to understand whats going on with it and then "101 things to do with a box" which is a way to teach your dog to start offering behaviors up. Its fun for you and the dog.<br><br>
Otherwise, google "nothing in life is free" which is along the lines of what Christy was talking about - basically teaching manners and that the dog has to do *something* (usually a sit) before he gets anything - petting, food, play, out the door.<br><br>
And finally, make sure you are taking him for at least one good long (45 mins) walk every day. Dogs need to get out into the world, sniff around and get that exercise. Try to vary the route, it will help you explore your new town too. If you can, two walks a day are even better. Also consider hiking and swimming if those options present themselves. Exercising your dog is a key componant of training.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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I think you are right to wait and get the stress of moving out of the way. I would get settled and then get serious. I found a link for you on Amazon.com. Not sure how good any of these are but it's a start:<br><br><a href="http://amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fs%2Fref%3Dnb_ss_gw%2F103-3767412-5909415%3Furl%3Dsearch-alias%253Daps%26field-keywords%3Dtraining%2Baustralian%2Bshepherd" target="_blank">http://amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw/103...alian+shepherd</a>
 

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To be perfectly honest, I don't know if you'll ever get the barking to stop. Aussies are herding dogs, and barking is a herding dog trait. My lab mix almost never barks. My collie and corgi (both herding dogs) are both big barkers. The corgi especially. Ein barks at every little noise under the sun. The only thing that works for him is a bark collar. I put it on him twice, after telling him several times that if he did not "hush", he would get a bark collar. I wanted him to learn the word "bark collar". That's all it took for him to realize what the bark collar was. Now, if he is too loud and won't stop barking, all you have to do is say, "Ein, do you need a bark collar?" and he is quiet.
 
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