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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I need help putting together ethnic food around a bellydance show. I own a restaurant & would love to have a gathering in a tasteful way (not a free-for-all-*******-hoot-at-the-women-dancer)

So I figured I'd have a buffet of ethnically appropriate food.& charge for dinner & dance show. I'm looking at recipes online...it's August 6.

If anyone has any recipes/tips/education for me on good food for a bellydance hafla, PLEASE share with me! TIA
 

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I lived in Turkey when I was a young teen so I don't have recipes but I do have ideas of foods I loved eating there-
borek-cheese filled filo dough folded up into triangles and fried
baklava
pilafs(I'll try to find and post a recipe I have for a good Turkish pilaf soon)
at the end of a meal they would bring out a big platter of fresh sliced fruit that was such a refreshing way to end the meal
I am a veggie but they did eat a lot of lamb
also Turkish coffee served in small glasses
pistachio nuts
that's all I can think of right now-Hope you have a great time. Sounds like a lot of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
mmm baklava...thought that was greek, but I'm sure everything carries over,huh.

Turkish coffee is a great idea, I'll have to find somewhere to borrow those fancy lil' glass cups.

I was thinking, since the dancing is such a FUSION, that I could open it up to Indian & Mediterranean FUSION food...

Just as long as I have something that isn't available around here (the only restaurants are Mexican & steakhouses & Chinese basically :LOL)

I was thinking of a curried couscous & chickpea dish...someone I know suggested samosas, but I think there'd be a LOT of prep there...I also LOVE Saag Paneer...I'm gonna change the title to include Indian too.

Thanks for your reply surfmama!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mountain
mmm baklava...thought that was greek, but I'm sure everything carries over,huh.
Ahem, thems fightn' words :LOL

The turks aren't as constrained to the basic layered baklava that you're thinking of, but you'll find a huge variety of nut-honey-filo combinations in Turkey.

Surf-mama -- I lived in Turkey while in high school as well as an AFS student. Were you AFS/Rotary?

Quote:
I also LOVE Saag Paneer...I'm gonna change the title to include Indian too.
If you say "saag paneer" outloud, it actually means "soft cheese" in Turkish, but you wouldn't find anything like that in Turkey.

Other ideas: Serving tea might be easier than making coffee for everyone. Turkish coffee isn't exactly something you make large batches of.

*Sheperd's salad (cucumber, tomatoes, feta cheese, olive) -- generic middle eastern dish
*Lahmacun or "Turkish Pizza." I've also seen this served in Lebanese restaurants as well. You can make them on pita breads or even tortillas if you don't have a wood oven.
*tabuoli
*fresh fruit for dessert

Lahmacun
DOUGH:
3/4 teaspoon dried yeast
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 cups lukewarm water
2 1/4 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
Olive oil for bowl & brushing dough

FILLING:
1 tablespoon butter
1 onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
8 ounces ground lamb or chuck
1 tomato, peeled, seeded and chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon kirmizi biber, or combination sweet paprika and cayenne pepper
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh mint
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of 1 lemon

Combine the yeast and sugar with a little of the warm water, and set aside until mixture is frothy. Sift the flour and salt into a
large bowl, and make a well in the center. Add the yeast mixture, along with the remaining warm water. Using your hands, work
the mixture into a dough, adding more water if necessary. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and knead until pliable and
springy, about 5 minutes. Place dough in an oiled bowl, turning to coat, cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place
until dough doubles in size, about 1 hour.

Punch down risen dough and knead on a lightly floured surface. Roll into a log and cut into 2 to 3 equal pieces. Roll each piece
into a ball, place on floured surface and let rest 30 minutes under a towel.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F, and preheat baking sheets, tiles, or a baking stone.

Prepare the filling: Melt the butter in a skillet, add the onion and saute until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and saute
another minute. Transfer onion mixture to a large bowl, add remaining ingredients, and mix thoroughly with your fingertips. If
mixture seems too dry, add a teaspoon of water.

Place a ball of dough on a floured surface and roll into a round, flat circle, about 1/8-inch thick. Place the round on the oiled,
preheated baking sheets or tiles. Brush the top with olive oil and spread with a thin, even layer of the meat filling, leaving a
1/2-inch border around the edge. Repeat with remaining dough and filling.

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes. The dough should still be soft enough to roll up.

Squeeze a little lemon juice over each of the hot lahmacuns, and serve immediately either flat or rolled up into cones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry about the baklava...I really need to be schooled on this!

Thanks for the recipe! That looks great!

Pita--excellent. I was thinking iced tea & we'd have a beer from that area, if I can find one.

Tabouli would be excellent for a dish I wouldn't have to keep hot in the buffet, right...cold tabouli salad is good...

lovin these ideas mamas, Please keep em coming!
 

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MMMM baklava!!

It DEFINENTLY carries! I have friends from all over the middle east, and baklava is found everywhere in that region in one form or another.

I'm actually kinda known for my baklava....I'm told I make 'Lebanese' baklava, which I think is hilarious considering the only person from Lebanon I ever met was the guy who had the gyro place at the mall...and no, I didn't exchange baklava notes! lol.
All I did was decide one day that I liked pistachios better than walnuts, so I was going to use them.....lol

Crap, I was gonna post my recipe but I am blanking on the amount of spices I put in with the nuts. What I will tell you now is find an ethnic store that sells rosewater, and you'll want Athens fillo because the sheets are sized to fit your standard 9 by 13 pan, which is SO MUCH EASIER than the PITA of trimming fillo to fit the way I USED TO DO. You'll also want to make sure you buy it a couple days ahead and leave it out to thaw, it's frozen. It's anywhere, I've found it at all the local groceries and even Super Walmart. I use local honey whenever possible too. You'll need cinnamon (sticks and ground), cloves (whole and ground) And they sell nice big bags of already-shelled pistachios at Sam's Club.
I'll be back with the actual recipe.
 

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Mmmmmmmmm....cigara boregi...*SLOBBER*. Ah, what a decadent food...

I'd also recommend Turkish wedding soup...a rich delight.

Quote:

Originally Posted by surf mama
I lived in Turkey when I was a young teen so I don't have recipes but I do have ideas of foods I loved eating there-
borek-cheese filled filo dough folded up into triangles and fried
baklava
pilafs(I'll try to find and post a recipe I have for a good Turkish pilaf soon)
at the end of a meal they would bring out a big platter of fresh sliced fruit that was such a refreshing way to end the meal
I am a veggie but they did eat a lot of lamb
also Turkish coffee served in small glasses
pistachio nuts
that's all I can think of right now-Hope you have a great time. Sounds like a lot of fun.
 
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