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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure these questions have been asked a thousand times before but I was wondering if you lovely ladies could help put my mind to rest about BFing. I'm 30 weeks this week with our first child and I'm going to BF'ing my darling daughter. I am scared that I will have no colustrum or milk for her when she is born and the hospital will push me into giving her formula or she will lose weight. I am not planning on supplementing her - just bfing until around 9 months. I have not leaked anything so far so my fear is that I'm going to be dry for her when she is born. I plan on a natural childbirth and want to have something to offer her but how do you know if you will??? I plan on attending the next LLL meeting in my area (first week of October) so I think that will help too but in the mean time...HELP!
 

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Well, around 37 or 38 weeks pg. I noticed little flecks of yellow "gunk" on my nipples. If I wasn't looking -- I might not have noticed it. That was all I noticed until each baby was 4 days old. Then "WHOOOSH." Milk. Milk everywhere. Milk enough to feed an army.<br><br>
I suggest you have your labor support person put a big sign on the baby's bassinett in the hospital that indicates the baby is breastfeeding and should receive NO formula and NO sugar water whatsoever. And I also suggest that you prevent your dd from spending anytime in the nursery without mama or daddy there beside her.<br><br>
Good luck! Try not to be nervous, but do try to be informed. Read a book, take a class, and by all means go to LLL. You will be *fine.*
 

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have faith! you made a perfect baby and you will make the perfect food for her, too.<br>
you may not feel like there is anything right after birth, but there will be. it may take a few days. if you have a c/s or a traumatic birth, it can take longer.<br>
just put her to your breast right after she is born, or as soon as you can if there are complications.<br>
you will be fine. if you don't have any friends who have successfully nursed for year or more, get to a la leche meeting and make a friend! you don't have to be best buddies, but it's good to have someone you feel comfortable with asking questions about nursing, and who won't tell you to wean at the slightest hint of difficulties.<br>
get some books. personally, i really like dr. sears' breastfeeding book. other popular ones are: the nursing mother's companion; the breastfeeding book of answers; so that's what they're for.<br>
and relax. if you're tense, you're going to have that much more difficulty letting down.<br>
all babies lose a little weight at birth. it's okay. it's normal. she'll gain it back. especially if you've had IV fluids during labor, the baby will lose water weight.
 

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My best advice would be don't be nervous. Impossible I know, but don't get all worked up over it. Read everything you can get your hands on about breastfeeding between now & then & go to your LLL meeting & talk to those mommas face to face. Then let nature take it's course...I just know you & your baby will be fine!<br><br>
It's so easy to get worried while you wait. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> Especially with your first. Think about all the great things breastfeeding your baby will do.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ladies -<br><br>
Thank you, thank you, thank you for all your wonderful advice and support. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
I am feeling so much better now - I am just going to trust my body and know that it will provide for my sweet baby girl. :bf<br><br><br>
-Diane
 

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Here are some sites for good reading to be informed ahead of time<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com</a><br><a href="http://www.breastfeedingonline.com" target="_blank">http://www.breastfeedingonline.com</a>
 

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well I hope my experience might allay some fears. I had nothing coming out my nipples before I gave birth. After the birth didn't notice anything when I tried to squeeze some colustrum out. I had a c/s and dd nursed after some 5 hours, well I still didn't know if she was getting anything but about the 3rd night, she had about 8 meconium poopy diapers in one night!! now that's the colustrum at work, it's a great natural laxative - so I know my dd was getting it even though I couldn't see it. BTW babies are born with water reserves - they swallow the amniotic fluid - it's in their stomach's so no need to worry about them getting dehydrated and they won't starve while your milk comes in either.<br><br>
Re your fear about her losing weight - this happened to my dd but it wasn't due to lack of milk, it was due to her latch being poor due to high arch to her palate, small mouth combined with big boobs, my lack of experience, the Lactation Consultants not working weekends at the hospital, my c/section and me being a bit out of it on painkillers... it's normal for babies to lose about 7% of their bodyweight, at 10% breastfeeding needs to be evaluated and over 10% the peds will start to demand supplementing which is probably necessary by that stage. But even if you do encounter any breastfeeding management problems,<br>
don't worry cause they're quite fixable.<br><br>
I would recommend that you investigate a few Lactation Consultants in your area, make sure they are IBCLCs. It's also a good idea to have the LC visit you after the birth to help set things on the right path. Next time I'm definitely doing that.<br><br>
If you're worried about the nurses giving bottles, get the Dr. to put a 'Nil by mouth' sign on the baby's chart. My doula advised me to write my own signs and bring them to the hospital. My hospital was good about this - never tried to give me formula or bottle feed dd. Are you rooming in together? That'll make things easier.<br><br>
And read kellymom.com - great info there. I also wished I'd read Jack Newman's book, Ultimate Guide to BF or something like that BEFORE the birth. Full of practical info.
 

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My DS was 6 lbs 14oz & dropped to 6lbs 7oz before we left the hospital. They wanted him to gain back to his birth weight by his 10 day check up...he was like 7lbs. 12oz! It felt like it took forever for my milk to come in, but obviously, when it did come in(3-4 days) he made up for it!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> You'll do fine!
 

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I didn't have any colostrum until after I had my first baby, none during pregnancy. But it was there after I had him and my milk came in around day three.<br><br>
My advice for when you're in the hospital is to room-in with your baby 24/7. Don't let her out of your sight. Remember, there's no "newborn procedure" that they can't do in your room. Don't let the hospital staff try to tell you otherwise. There's no good reason for them to take the baby anywhere unless something's wrong.
 

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You might not notice colostrum, and it might seem that the baby is getting 'nothing'. And she will probably lose weight - almost all babies do. The target is generally to regain to birth weight by 14 days.<br><br>
Ignore the scaremongers and contact LLL if they try to get you to supplement. It really shouldn't be necessary. Get some books, and take them to the hospital with you. If necessary, print off info about weight loss, colostrum and when milk comes in, to give you confidence and to hand to the staff if they hassle you.<br><br>
Now, relax. Your body knows what to do, better than Nestle. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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It is so sad to me that women's confidence in their own beautiful bodies' functioning is so undermined by our patriarchal health care system, and the marketing of artificial baby milk by big evil corporations only concerned with the almighty $, not babies' health!<br><br>
...breathe...<br><br>
Thank you for being honest about your fears though. They are all too common and you will help others by this thread.<br><br>
Now, as far as making colostrum and milk. It is not necc to be able to express colostrum in the last weeks of pregnancy to prove to yourself or others that you will make it post partum. When you give birth, your body will go through a hormonal change. When you deliver the placenta, it is a cue to the body to get in gear for the next stage, lactating.<br><br>
Do you have blood, sweat, tears, saliva? You will have colostrum and milk. It is just what womens' bodies do. Did you ovulate, menstruate, have sex and conceive and carry a baby to term? You will lactate. It is just what women's bodies do. Even ifyou had asssisted fertility treatments, even if you end up with a surgical birth, you will lactate.<br><br>
Colostrum is only produced in teaspoons at a time. It is low in volume, high in just the right nutrients a newborn needs. It flows slowly to allow the newborn to practice bfing without being overwhelmed with milk.<br><br>
Many women love <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/reading.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="reading"><b>The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding.</b> Borrow it from your LLL group's library and see if it reassures you even more.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Have you seen how much stuff come outta them in the first 24 hrs? Meconium enough to re-tar the drive way <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.<br><br>
Even formula fed babies generally loose weight. Less weight than breastfed babes, but the BF's tend to gain it back quicker. Ds was 6lb 14oz @ birth, 6lb 9oz upon leaving the hospital and 7 lb 2oz after 2 days at home!<br><br>
Best of luck to you, mama!
 

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I had no signs of milk before my DS was born either, in fact my breasts didn't even get larger until right at the end. I was worried too, but it all worked out just fine for us.<br><br>
My DS was even 9 pds 2 oz. and I had more than enough colostrum for him. They did try and push formula on me, but I rebelled and didn't give it to him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> I had one nurse swear because he was so big that he wouldn't get enough from me. She stood over me watching to make sure I gave it to him, but Connor didn't want any part of the bottle so she relented. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I think the most he lost was 8 oz., I was told the normal was 10% of their birthweight. Just keep track of her wet diapers and if she's having enough, you should be fine. If you're really worried you can take her in for weight checks<br><br>
I would make sure that they know your wishes regarding formula ahead of time.<br><br>
Don't worry, you'll be fine! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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