Mothering Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, today we found out my beautiful, bright and funny 3.5 year old has Sensory Integration Disorder<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">:. It was diagnosed and we are now to go back next week. But I dont know ANYTHING about it. I just know that they think it was caused due to lack of stimulation as an infant (we adopted her through child services. She was neglected and starved. She sat in a car seat most of her babyhood).<br>
Im angry and upset<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/rant.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rant">:. I cant help but feel that this is something that didn't have to be! What kind of a parent doesn't hold a newborn baby!? I can't keep my hands off them even when they are someone elses! How can you not hold your child while you feed them and love them. Im hurt.<br>
And to add to it, I dont even know what this is or means. They said they will explain better once they do further evaluating to determine how severe it is. My google-foo is bringing up stuff that I cannot understand.<br>
Please, someone dumb it down for me. I need help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,976 Posts
First off, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">!! And welcome, b/c we are FULL of sensory processing disorder info! Perhaps TOO full of it.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Most of us here w/kiddos with spd/sid (same thing, dif name) can't pinpoint anything that "made" our kids this way, so it's perhaps nothing that would have been any different regardless of your dc's babyhood. My son's issues were visible as young as just a few months of age.<br><br><a href="http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/" target="_blank">THIS</a> website has good info, and most folks now call it SPD for sensory processing disorder, so using those terms might get you more info if you do google. SID is also the acronym for sudden infant death, which, according to our OT, is one of the main reasons the name has been changed.<br><br>
Instead of googling and getting confused, try reading "the out of synch child", it's far more organized and a very good intro to the world of sensory issues. A world which is terribly frustrating at times, but not so horrible once you get started. And you'll find that, as you move along the path, the therapies and "tools' you're given for your child really do help and improve their life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Hugs momma. I believe SID (also called SPD - sensory processing disorder) is common among adoptees. Do you know if your child is a sensory seeker or a sensory avoider? What types of things brought you to seek professional advice - that will help.<br><br>
For starters the following website has a ton of resources - <a href="http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com" target="_blank">http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com</a><br><br>
My favorite book on the topic is Sensational Kids by Lucy Jane ******. A couple of tried and true books on the topic are The Out-of-Sync Child and The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun (author's name escapes me at the moment).<br><br>
Both of my children have sensory issues and so do I. One is an avoider and gets overwhelmed with sensory input (sensory avoider) and the other is a sensory seeker (can't get enough input so craves it and seeks it out). I'm an avoider. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,514 Posts
Sensory integration disorder or dysfunction isn't so bad. Really. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
(DS is adopted as well, from an orphanage in China, but many kids with sensory issues were not adopted and were in no way neglected as infants. And, honestly, DS was walking and talking at 13.5 months which really suggests he was not neglected.)<br><br>
I'll take a stab at a quick explanation based on our experiences and others will correct me!<br><br>
Some people have sensory issues. Those can be sensory seeking or sensory avoiding. Or a mixture.<br><br>
My kid is a mixture. He is sensory avoiding when it comes to noise. He objects strenously (and, ironically, loudly) to public bathrooms because of the noise when the toilets are flushed. When he was younger he freaked about the garbage disposal, the vacuum, the phone, the alarm clock, and so on.<br><br>
In other ways he is sensory seeking. He used to overstuff his mouth (couldn't tell it was full so he kept stuffing food in to try to get the feeling). He walks on his toes (seeking more input). He has been known to spin. He banged his head some when he was little. He loves (or occasionally hates) swings. He is in contast motion looking for input (although this has slowed down some as he has gotten older). He's been know to eat straight lemon. . . . When he was younger he seriously lacked caution and needed close watching to make sure he wasn't trying to run down the slide again. (At 4 1/2 he can run down the slide without falling, but at 18 months--good thing I caught him!)<br><br>
Good books include: "The Out of Sync Child" and "The Out of Sync Child Has Fun."<br><br>
Occupational therapy will likely help you all out. We try to spend a lot of time at the park so DS can climb and swing and run and then he feels better so he acts better. Other input, like playing with different textures, is fun but not as helpful to him. Every kid is different though.<br><br>
If you'd like to post more about your child's particular issues, you'll probably get some commiseration and advice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
There really is no way of knowing how much is how she is wired from birth and how much is from the neglect she endured. But either way I think any time we're faced with diagnoses that are hard to hear many of us go through a grief process--which often includes anger. Even if there is no one to blame. It would be terribly hard though to know your beautiful child was neglected. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">: Anyway I wanted you to know you'll be heard and understood here. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
You got some great suggestions already. My son with special needs (autism spectrum, metabolic condition) is a sensory seeker. His twin brother is pretty typically developing but is a sensory seeker oral/mouth wise and has some noise sensitivity. I've got some sensory issues myself (actually a good mix of my boys issues interestingly) so they come by it genetically from good old mommy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im not sure if she is seeking or avoiding. Here are the symptoms she had that led them to believe this is her problem:<br><br>
Some foods she will not tolerate eating because of texture. Pasta is a biggy.<br>
Tags bother her<br>
She hates shoes and socks<br>
She gets up all hours of the night<br>
If its quiet and she has nothing to say, she will make noise to fill the silence<br>
She jumps...everywhere.<br>
She is constantly moving and doing and its never enough<br><br>
Then they asked me about how she was when she came to me from CPS. She didn't want to be held much, and she wouldn't make eye contact for almost a year. But it wasn't RAD or anything, she was very attached, but just didn't like those sorts of things. She now wants and need to cuddle CONSTANTLY.<br><br>
No mommy wants to hear something is wrong with their baby, but it still hurts so much. Is this something that will be a lifetime thing for her? Or is it something that goes away with therapy? What kind of things will they do in therapy? They mentioned something about "Brushing" 3 times a day....what is that?<br>
Thanks for the help and support and the many links and book recommendations, Im going to spend some time trying to read and understand!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,514 Posts
The first three things sound like sensory avoiding, the rest more like sensory seeking. Lots of people with sensory issues have a mix.<br><br>
There are people much more qualified than I am to say whether this is a lifelong issue. I think I'd say yes and no. Yes, most kids with sensory issues continue to have those issues into adulthood. But as adults most people are able to compensate for those issues without much trouble.<br><br>
Occupational therapy for my kid included finding out what sort of activities help him feel better so I can try tomake sure he gets those. Since your kid has more avoidance things going on, OT can help her learn to like different textures of food and so on.<br><br>
Brushing is a protocol where you/therapist use a brush all over her body. It is a bit time-consuming I think. We gave it a try, but DS objected strongly and the OT agreed that we should not push it. I think it does help some kids quite a bit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
Sounds to me as if she's got a mix of avoiding and seeking (not unusual).<br>
The first three things sound like tactile sensitivity so you might watch for that while reading. The bottom three are likely sensory seeking. Proprioceptive/body in space would be one term and auditory for the sound seeking thing. Sleeping could be either avoding or seeking. Sometimes kids with proprioceptive issues like weighted blankets or tight bed clothes for sleep. We use melatonin too to help Andrew with sleep. As you read more you'll probably be able to pick out what you're seeing.<br><br>
As far as all her life. There are things that you can do (like the brushing; they will give you a surgical brush and you will brush her arms/legs and maybe other body parts followed by providing her joints with stimulation...like you would brush her legs and then she'd jump) They'll show you how. It can help with what you're describing. You can help her find ways to meet her sensory needs in appropriate ways.<br>
I've still got sensory issues but as you grow up you learn to manage them better. So when I was a kid I ate weird stuff and put things in my mouth. Now I still sometimes bite my nails and I can't have a pen or the like without chewing it to death. So I chew gum and that helps. So I've still got some sensory issues but I manage them.<br>
I was told when I was a child I was really sensitive to clothing and being dirty/wet. So if I got a drop of water on me I had to change my clothes. I only wore a certain type of pants and shirts. Those types of things. I do fine with any of that now though getting wet still bugs me. I don't change my clothes though!<br>
Caleb (my typical guy) wasn't very cuddly as a toddler. He's turned into a super cuddler too with age. He still only lets us kiss him on the top of his head though. And sometimes he needs his space and we give it of course. I need my physical space too sometimes and that is entirely sensory for me. Hard as a mommy sometimes because I feel like I'm going to jump out of my skin when both my boys are into constant hugs/contact and I need space that day but I make it. Andrew who has a lot of issues was always and is super cuddly. I think in his case he craves the physical input he gets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,295 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bdavis337</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9836762"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">First off, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">!! And welcome, b/c we are FULL of sensory processing disorder info! Perhaps TOO full of it.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Most of us here w/kiddos with spd/sid (same thing, dif name) can't pinpoint anything that "made" our kids this way, so it's perhaps nothing that would have been any different regardless of your dc's babyhood. My son's issues were visible as young as just a few months of age.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"> yup, ds was this way from the day he was born <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> all the pp's ave given you great advice. I have learnt to just take it one day at a time, and try to see the joy in the little things <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
How old was she when you were able to adopt her? I havent read all the posts but this site: <a href="http://www.sinetwork.org/" target="_blank">http://www.sinetwork.org/</a> and this one <a href="http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/" target="_blank">http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/</a> are both really helpful. There are many moms here that have kiddos with SPD diagnosed and undinagnosed. You will find a lot of help here. Does she seem to seek or avoid certian things?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
now that i look up and read i see that my question has already been answered. she seems to be a mix, which is common. I was gonna answer the brushing question but two people beat me to it! argh! i seem to always come in late on these things, oh well. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
My dd is 5 and we think she has sensory issues as well. She has almost all the same symptoms as your child. I'm sorry that your dd had such a rough beginning. I'd be angry too, but like other people have said here, it can also be from other things. My dd was constantly cuddled, attachment parented, co-slept, breastfed, etc. and she still has problems with this. So it can affect anyone. I hope that you can find the help that your dd needs<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top