Mothering Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interesting new report on C-Section rates and birth related hospitalizations from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb71.pdf

In summary...

In 2006, 31.6 percent of childbirths were by C-section- a 51 percent increase from 1997, when 21.0 percent were C-section deliveries.

C-sections were, overall, the most commonly performed operating room procedure in U.S. hospitals.

The increase in C-section delivery was coupled with a decrease in the rate of
VBACs, which fell to less than 10 percent of all deliveries in 2006.

C-sections accounted for 34 percent of all privately insured births, but only 25 percent of uninsured births.


  • And on a positive note...

    There was a 37 percent decrease in the use of forceps and a 55 percent decrease in episiotomies from 1997 to 2006.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
...probably because you don't need forceps and episiotomies during c-sections, huh?

The c-section rate is beyond ridiculous in America. Read 'Pushed: The Painful Truth about Childbirth and Maternity Care' by Jennifer Block if you want more information.

It just disgusts me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by writteninkursive View Post
...probably because you don't need forceps and episiotomies during c-sections, huh?
I haven't seen anything written in the context of the US, but a while back I saw some articles in the UK press about concern over the use of forceps being a skill that is being lost. Apparently it's much harder to teach forceps compared to c-section as it's so much about feel.

There was definitely a time when forceps were overused, now it seems like some of the decrease in rate is due to extra c-sections and not necessarily a positive thing.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top