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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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WHO Wants to Market Vaccines Like Burgers and Soda. http://www.businessinsider.com/what...oca-cola-brand-soda-sales-decline-2015-4?op=1

And another take on it:
http://vaccinefactcheck.org/2015/04/13/sell-vaccines-like-coca-cola-world-health-organization/

Do you think it will work? I'm not sure that now is a good time to take advice from the carbonated beverage industry.
What are your thoughts?
Well, to be fair, if your sales are down, you consult someone whose expertise is in selling.

I think the trouble WHO will have, and it's related to the trouble Coke has already had, is that it's possible not everyone is as stupid as they hope. There's clear evidence that PT Barnum's * maxim "no one ever lost money underestimating the intelligence of the American People" still has many adherents. (See exhibit A, this campaign season). But sizable minorities are less isolated, which, if I was planning to sell something, I would use in niche marketing to increase market share. (See exhibit B, this campaign season).

A brave new world, indeed.

*Actually, attributed to HL Menken
http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2011/09/no-one-ever-went-broke-underestimating.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sure you consult the experts. But in light of consistently declining sales, they haven't done much good for Coca Cola, have they?

I don't hear much about HFCS anymore, but its condescending astroturf ad campaign from a few years ago, (they've since taken down their Sweet Surprise website), apparently didn't do much good. If anything, it backfired big time, and marketers and manufacturers are finally listening to consumers. Industry can only do so much in attempt to manipulate the masses.

I forget which essay I read, but Ralph Nader said that advertising is based on a lot of wild conjecture and untested assumptions. I'm skeptical as to whether this vaccine marketing campaign will sway many people. At least the paid consultants are benefiting from it.
 

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Well, to be fair, if your sales are down, you consult someone whose expertise is in selling.

I think the trouble WHO will have, and it's related to the trouble Coke has already had, is that it's possible not everyone is as stupid as they hope. There's clear evidence that PT Barnum's maxim "no one ever lost money underestimating the intelligence of the American People" still has many adherents. (See exhibit A, this campaign season). But sizable minorities are less isolated, which, if I was planning to sell something, I would use in niche marketing to increase market share. (See exhibit B, this campaign season).

A brave new world, indeed.
Actually that quote is attributed to H.L.Mencken.
Perhaps the PT Barnum quote you were looking for was "there's a sucker born every minute" but there is doubt as to whether PT came up with it or just used a version of it.

Consumers care about benefits, not supporting facts. Reason leads to conclusions, while emotion leads to action (i.e. change comes from feelings, not facts).
FEAR - fear of loss, fear of missing out- motivates consumers to buy.
I've seen a commercial about Twinrix - HepB/HepA combo vaccine in which they use it (fear).
The music plays as they scan the beach (Dominican Republic?). Graphics pop up. HepA from a drink, HepB from stepping on glass, HepA from fruit salad, HepB from nail clippers. A couple walks on screen hand in hand whilst a voice over asks why take the risk.
So the immediate fear being sold here is the fear of getting sick on vacation, the fear of missing out.
That's a niche market. People who can afford to travel. That commercial wouldn't be received well in poor areas.
I don't think they could come up with one ad that would resonate with everyone.
 

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Actually that quote is attributed to H.L.Mencken.
Perhaps the PT Barnum quote you were looking for was "there's a sucker born every minute" but there is doubt as to whether PT came up with it or just used a version of it.



FEAR - fear of loss, fear of missing out- motivates consumers to buy.
I've seen a commercial about Twinrix - HepB/HepA combo vaccine in which they use it (fear).
The music plays as they scan the beach (Dominican Republic?). Graphics pop up. HepA from a drink, HepB from stepping on glass, HepA from fruit salad, HepB from nail clippers. A couple walks on screen hand in hand whilst a voice over asks why take the risk.
So the immediate fear being sold here is the fear of getting sick on vacation, the fear of missing out.
That's a niche market. People who can afford to travel. That commercial wouldn't be received well in poor areas.
I don't think they could come up with one ad that would resonate with everyone.
The attitude demonstrates a deep disrespect for ordinary folk.

With deep pockets, they can do ads for every niche.
 
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The problem is that there are always those pesky 'pockets' of people who can't be fooled, no matter how deep the pockets of the supplier/advertiser.
That is where the PR campaigns come in to promote shunning, mandates, deprivation of employment and schooling and other types of harassment. Which everyone will go along with because those people over there are BAD and deserve to be deprived of basic stuff.
 

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This article from a blogger is called Vaccines, PR and the News Cycle and talks about two PR practices called astro-turfing and seeding. We've talked about the first one before but I would like to discuss seeding.

Seeding is when the PR firms plant stories with news outlets and online influencers with the end goal of those stories slowly transforming the narrative.

It can be done when a major shift/event is planned (usually up to a year or more out) and you want public perception to be favorable, or it can be done when you need to draw attention away from or bury an unfavorable news story.
The blogger uses examples of PR companies seeding celebrity stories. I knew that the paps get called to be told where celebrities are going to be but I never thought much about the product placement aspect of it when you see celebrities carrying some thing like coffee.

So how does that apply to vaccines? Well the blogger wrote the article in Feb of last year with all the alleged measles cases in the news. And what was that all about? She suggested it might be because:

In the last quarter of 2014, there was an under-reported story about how a judge ruled that two whistleblowers within Merck & Co. had adequately proven that Merck & Co. may have lied to the U.S Government about the efficacy of its mumps vaccine. Also under-reported was a story about a whistleblower within the CDC who will testify that the CDC covered up evidence linking the MMR vaccine to autism.
 

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This article from a blogger is called Vaccines, PR and the News Cycle and talks about two PR practices called astro-turfing and seeding. We've talked about the first one before but I would like to discuss seeding.

The blogger uses examples of PR companies seeding celebrity stories. I knew that the paps get called to be told where celebrities are going to be but I never thought much about the product placement aspect of it when you see celebrities carrying some thing like coffee.
Seeding can be a helpful clue to upcoming vaccine legislation. A year before the first attempt to remove the philosophical exemption in VT (2011-2012) news stories started to appear talking about low vaccination rates and "too many" exemptions.

If you see stories like this in your local papers, write to your legislator NOW and explain why exemptions are important. The best arguments, I think, include: lack of liability, bad behavior from drug companies (are vaccines in a magic bubble), regulatory capture and the fact that sooner or later a vaccine will be approved and mandated which is obviously not safe. (from our point of view this has already occurred, but you've got to work from a place that a legislator will "get")

Know how PR games information!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is where the PR campaigns come in to promote shunning, mandates, deprivation of employment and schooling and other types of harassment. Which everyone will go along with because those people over there are BAD and deserve to be deprived of basic stuff.
To be fair, I don't think that the WHO is trying to take this approach or to engage in any "seeding." They're consulting with advertising consultants instead of PR firms precisely because they prefer to a different tactic: Psychological manipulation to induce behavioral change.

You'll see here that the WHO has the latter in mind. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X15005034

Watch this documentary if you haven't seen it already. :) http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-century-of-the-self/

It's interesting to hear the newer euphemisms for the word "propaganda"; "public relations" and "social marketing" are now phrases that we take for granted.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
A little off-topic, but have you noticed how refreshingly different it is to read articles from bloggers like Marco Cáceres, Barbara Loe Fisher, and Lawrence Solomon? They can get their point across and even issue strong criticisms without a bunch of verbal diarrhea about how stupid and evil their opponents are.
 

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Seeding can be a helpful clue to upcoming vaccine legislation. A year before the first attempt to remove the philosophical exemption in VT (2011-2012) news stories started to appear talking about low vaccination rates and "too many" exemptions.

If you see stories like this in your local papers, write to your legislator NOW and explain why exemptions are important. The best arguments, I think, include: lack of liability, bad behavior from drug companies (are vaccines in a magic bubble), regulatory capture and the fact that sooner or later a vaccine will be approved and mandated which is obviously not safe. (from our point of view this has already occurred, but you've got to work from a place that a legislator will "get")

Know how PR games information!
A useful technique is evaluating the validity of anything you see posted online is to do a word phrase search. Therefore, if you see an article about prosecution of a homeschool family, select an identifiable phrase from it. You can search to see how many articles about this family use that phrase. Then you can do an advanced search with "minus" that phrase to see if another source of information exists.

It's truly amazing to see how little independent confirmation of sources is used, in the "new media" world of the Internet.
 
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