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well #2 is due in oct and i was wondering when i could start night weening dd who is now 7 months so she can start sleeping in her crib. our bed isn't big enough for all 4 of us. i think it would be so much easier if i only had one to worry about at night.
 

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I'm sorry but at 7 months the baby is way too young to night wean OR sleep alone. I know it must be frusterating but please hang in there! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I wouldn't even CONSIDER night weaning until far into the second year. (And I don't plan to NW at all.) At 7 months the baby NEEDS to nurse at night.<br>
Please reconsider.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> somewhere in the back of my mind i knew that 7 months was too young. i just want to get her ready for when the baby comes. when can i start? what is a good age? her crib is in our room so she wouldn't be isolated and in another room.
 

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You can certainly start gently transitioning her into the crib in your room. The book No-Cry Sleep Solution has tips on doing that. However, I wouldn't personally consider nightweaning before 18 months - 2 years, and the bare minimum would be 12 months. If you can fit a crib and your bed in one room anyway, would it be possible to get a larger mattress instead?<br><br>
And even if she is out of your bed and nightweaned at some point doesn't mean you will no longer have to worry about her at night, unfortunately. Do you get enough support from your partner at night? That might be one thing to work on, a divide and conquer approach. We alternate nightwakings unless she obviously needs milk.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommitola</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8110330"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can certainly start gently transitioning her into the crib in your room. The book No-Cry Sleep Solution has tips on doing that. However, I wouldn't personally consider nightweaning before 18 months - 2 years, and the bare minimum would be 12 months. If you can fit a crib and your bed in one room anyway, would it be possible to get a larger mattress instead?<br><br>
And even if she is out of your bed and nightweaned at some point doesn't mean you will no longer have to worry about her at night, unfortunately. Do you get enough support from your partner at night? That might be one thing to work on, a divide and conquer approach. We alternate nightwakings unless she obviously needs milk.</div>
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Exactly, just because she is nightweaned does not mean she will sleep through the night. At this very young age, they need the calories at night, at 10 months babies are still getting 25% of their calories at night, most babies anyway (this is a quote from Sear's I believe) And there is teething, developmental milestones... those come with very many nightwaking all on their own unrelated to nursing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommitola</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8110330"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can certainly start gently transitioning her into the crib in your room. The book No-Cry Sleep Solution has tips on doing that. However, I wouldn't personally consider nightweaning before 18 months - 2 years, and the bare minimum would be 12 months. If you can fit a crib and your bed in one room anyway, would it be possible to get a larger mattress instead?<br><br>
And even if she is out of your bed and nightweaned at some point doesn't mean you will no longer have to worry about her at night, unfortunately. Do you get enough support from your partner at night? That might be one thing to work on, a divide and conquer approach. We alternate nightwakings unless she obviously needs milk.</div>
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of course i would still worry about her i just ment that i would only have to wake up for one baby and dd sleep though the night. im not sure if that came out right but you know what i mean?
 

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I disagree that it is too young for the babe to be sleeping in her own bed, as the crib is in your room. I think you could try it, gently, and see how she reponds. My daughter was always far, far happier in a co-sleeper or crib (literally inches from our bed)--she screamed and thrashed when we tried to sleep with her. I think the important thing is to read your daughter's signals, rather than assuming she is ready/not ready based on other people's experiences or philosophies. Does she already sleep in the crib for naps? If so, she might not find it to be such a hard transition (and if she doesn't, naps might be a good place to start)--but if she's clearly unhappy, just keep her with you.<br><br>
Digression: we considered nightweaning at around a year (dd will turn 1 in about a week), because night nursing is hugely problematic for us. I have Raynaud's and other nursing issues, so I need to latch dd on and position her very carefully--which means nursing at night involves taking her out into the living room where there's some light or propping up pillows and nursing in bed with a flashlight. It is always painful for me, so the combination of the pain and having to actually get up means that I get pretty wakeful--sometimes I can't get back to sleep for an hour or two, by which point babe is usually up again. That said, dd has shown us in many ways that she is clearly NOT ready for nightweaning--she doesn't accept comfort from dh, and when I've tried (for a couple of minutes) to rock her back to sleep at night, she's clearly miserable. So we're not doing any nightweaning yet, but if the situation deteriorates further, we might think about it again.<br><br>
Personally, I'm starting to balk a little bit at the idea (which I see on MDC frequently) that mothers are not allowed to do ANYTHING that might make their lives a little easier. I don't subscribe to the "do everything on the AP checklist at ANY cost to you and your family or you're a bad mother" school of thought.<br><br>
Anyway, as far as the idea of nightweaning is concerned, you can always wait to see how things go with your dd and the new baby. You might find that nursing both of them at night is easier than you thought it would be. Or, at that point, your dd might be nursing less at night anyway.
 

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I can't think of any reason you couldn't start moving her to her own crib now, if she's already used to her crib during the day. We moved my daughter to her own crib at night two weeks ago and she's 9 months old. She just wasn't doing well with cosleeping at all - if she woke up she thought it was playtime. Since moving her she's started sleeping 10 hours straight at night. Granted, I don't think she'll keep this up <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">, nor do I think every baby will react that way, but in her case she did.<br><br>
Really, I'd look more at what type of signals is she giving you. Is co sleeping working really well for her right now or is she starting to show signs she's ready to move on, too? In our case, I honestly wasn't really ready for my DD to stop cosleeping but it was time and I decided to respect that. And, you know, if she's not ready to move yet - give her a few months and then re-evaluate. October is still a while away and while your DD might not be ready tomorrow to move into her crib, she might be ready in July, for example.<br><br>
Just my thoughts. And congratulations on your next little one!
 

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i agree with those who say it's not to early to move her to a crib. you gotta think long term here, and having a newborn in bed with you, along with an older baby might just feel like too much of a crowd! also, with a newborn, there's lotsa action in the bed all night long with nursing, dipe changes, burping, etc.<br>
i also agree that it's too soon to night-wean. sorry! but you could start pulling her off right when you feel she's sucking just for comfort so that maybe her night nursing will tend to only be for nutrition and not that on/off comfort nursing that can be so depleating, especially while preg. you could nurse, take her off and if she cries either nurse a bit more or, better yet (in my opinion), give her to dh for comfort. this will set the stage doe when the new baby comes and dh has to take over more of the comforting for baby#1. it may seem not exactly ideal to rush things a bit like this but, hey, the family's growing and stuff has to happen to make space for the new baby. it's gonna be fine. good luck!
 

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nak<br><br>
my 1st thought when i read your post was . . . man, that's really setting the stage for some potential resentment issues. i had it great until <i>you</i> came along.
 

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I don't see a problem with moving her to a crib. I don't think you should night-wean as in purposely stopping her from nursing at night, but she may night-wean on her own, and I think that's totally ok.<br><br>
My babies both slept in a bassinet in my room until about 2.5 months old (adjusted age in Joshua's case), when they started sleeping 10+ hours at night. I did not train them to do this. They just did it. Anytime they woke up to nurse, I nursed them. Once they were sleeping through the night like that, I moved them to a crib in their own room. They slept very well. Now when teething hit for Joshua, around 4 months adjusted age, he started waking 2-3 times a night, and yes, I went in to his room and nursed him. No big deal. He'd go right back to sleep. After his teeth came through, he started sleeping longer again. Aaron is 6 months, and he has mostly slept all night except for the occasional one time wakeup. Again, if he wakes and is hungry, I go to him and nurse him, and I think you should do the same with your DD. If they're hungry at this age, they're hungry. But you may find her starting to sleep longer on her own, thus giving you more sleep.<br><br>
We tried co-sleeping with Joshua, and we were all very uncomfortable (frankly, I was in pain, trying to find a comfortable position without squishing the <5 lb baby). And Joshua was so wiggly anyway, he slept better in the bassinet. So do what works for your family. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Several of you mentioned that you nurse the baby at night <i>if</i> they need to be nursed and comfort the other times. How do you know the difference? I guess I am just lazy (and I do hate to hear my baby cry, so I tend to do the easiest thing to make him happy) He wakes 3 times a night and nurses all three times. How do you know if one of those wakings is just for comfort? Is there a specific sign that ya'll look for?
 

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If my baby wakes and cries, I nurse him. If he wakes and plays, I don't bother to go in. There was one night that Aaron woke up and played for like 45 minutes and then fell back asleep. He never cried in that instance though, so he didn't need me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SaraBravo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8111002"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">of course i would still worry about her i just ment that i would only have to wake up for one baby and dd sleep though the night. im not sure if that came out right but you know what i mean?</div>
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I didn't mean to say you wouldn't worry about her...She's your baby, so of course you will help her if she needs it. I think the point Peony and I were trying to make is that a night weaned baby may still wake for many other reasons - had a bad dream, developmental spurt, teething, upset tummy, thirsty, you name it. Night weaning is not a magic ticket to easier nights, so if your dd isn't ready for night weaning, I wouldn't sweat it. Now is not the same as how she'll be in August or September, as other people also rightly mentioned, but I know the anticipation can be tough when you're probably already exhausted just from being pregnant. You'll find your routine, and it may be time for your partner to help out at night if that's at all possible.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BetsyS</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8112197"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Several of you mentioned that you nurse the baby at night <i>if</i> they need to be nursed and comfort the other times. How do you know the difference? I guess I am just lazy (and I do hate to hear my baby cry, so I tend to do the easiest thing to make him happy) He wakes 3 times a night and nurses all three times. How do you know if one of those wakings is just for comfort? Is there a specific sign that ya'll look for?</div>
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If she wakes before we go to bed, we pick her up and cuddle. She'll snuggle into the shoulder and be out again quickly. If she doesn't just snuggle right away or she fusses, then I know she needs me, so we nurse. If we're already in bed, sometimes she settles with a hand placed on her chest or flipping onto her side. But if not, she scoots over and latches on. So she tells us, basically. I'm lazy too, and if she's cool with patting her back instead of a 20 minutes nursing session, then I see nothing wrong with just patting her for 2 minutes.
 

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I nursed two at night and I think it was easier than if I had nightweaned ds1. I learned to be able to nurse two while lying down (its amazing how far your breasts can stretch <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">). So don't feel like you have to night wean her right now since she is still so young.
 

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I think you should wait until #2 arrives before you decide what to do. Things have a way of working themselves out, I promise! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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You could consider pumping so DP could give one child a bottle and you could nurse hte other... that way DC is getting night nutrition and you can have her in the crib. But she isn't going to start sleeping throught he night just because she's weaned, I would guess. DS still doesn't exactly, even though he's in the bed with me AND weaned. FWIW <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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have only skimmed the other posts - but i would definitely agree not to go borrowing trouble... so much can change in a few months with a 7 month old.<br><br>
we did start nightweaning DS when i got pregnant, but he was over 18 months... i found it pretty gentle because we could talk to him about what we needed from him... we also took a couple months to fully do it.<br><br>
back at 6 months, though, we did start having DH put DS down to bed at night so that i got a little break and they got some great time to build their attachment. it was also helpful for me to know that DH could put DS down to sleep so he could handle naptimes sometime, or middle of the night wakings when he was waking up more times at night than i could bear to nurse him. we weren't trying to nightwean him then, but getting DH involved was very helpful, and they still love bedtimes together almost 2 years later!<br><br>
also, as far as worrying about two in bed... we found our DS started sleeping a lot more soundly after 12 months... not necessarily longer stretches <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> but just more soundly asleep while asleep. DD doesn't seem to wake him at night - thank goodness! we've also found that DS will now sleep through the night if he is in bed with us, but will wake up and need help going back to sleep if we put him in bed in another room. so in a way it's easier to have all of us together!
 

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My two are 21 months apart and DS nightweaned very gently at about 15 months (3 months into my pregnancy). However, he still woke every 2-3 hours at night until he was over age 2. He slept part-time with us... half the night in his own bed, half with us.<br><br>
My suggestion would be this: You will almost certainly deal with two babies waking up at night, whether you nightwean the older one or not. Figure out the easiest way to deal with this... buy a king sized bed and push a twin up against it so it's more comfortable, ask DH to go to the older one at night (this is what I did) or figure out how to get your older one comfortable at night in her crib, even if it's just for the beginning.<br><br>
It's hard at first... but it gets easier! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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DS is 12 months and we are slowly trying to nightwean. I nurse him but not all the way to sleep and try to put him down slightly awake and pat him until he is asleep in the crib. When he wakes I try just patting him. If he cries then I pick him up and rock. If rocking seems to calm him then I do not nurse him. If he is still restless then I nurse him. Since I have started not just jumping straight to nursing he has been sleeping a *little* better. I would just try it gradually and stop if your DC is not responding well.
 
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