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Discussion Starter #1
Ds is 8 months old and doesn't seem to communicate with us at all. It's not just that he doesn't babble but it just seems he's always kind of in his own little world. I'll say his name and more often than not he won't even seem to hear me. I know he can hear so it's obvious he's just completely ignoring me. I was taking his picture yesterday and I kept saying, "Emeric" and getting louder and he didn't even look up at all. He was too busy trying to eat his toes and just didn't care I guess. He does this frequently. I'll be holding him and he will respond to me talking to him very briefly(he'll try to grab my face, screech, whatever) and then he could care less that you're talking to him.<br><br>
I'm starting to worry. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> He does get excited when he sees me and seems to prefer me over dh(he makes it known by screeching and sort of leaning towards me). He does make eye contact but if I put my arms out to see if he wants to be picked up he just starts making this hyperventilating noise as if to say, "Yes! Pick me up!" but he won't actually put his arms out to be picked up.<br><br>
How much do I read into this at 8 months? I'd like honest answers, I can handle it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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Yes, you are seeing some red flags, possibly on the autism spectrum. I suggest talking to a developmental pediatrician about this...if your regular pediatrician doesn't want to give you a referral and prefers a "wait and see" approach, then you must INSIST on an immediate referral. You can also call the early intervention program at your local school district for a free evaluation. There are therapies that can help with the behaviors you describe, and those therapies are much more effective the younger the child is.<br><br>
Your little boy is lucky to have you as his mama. Lots of love to you and your family. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did mention to his doctor a few weeks ago that he wasn't babbling yet and she said, "well, he's the 3rd child and he's a boy". That's really all she said and didn't seem concerned. I AM concerned however because something just feels off with him. He just does not interact with us like I feel he should be at 8 months. His only way of interacting is to grab at your face and screech when he's excited but he doesn't really pay attention for long. He does smile when I play peek a boo but if I peek through my fingers and watch him he forgets right away that we were playing any sort of game, if that makes sense.
 

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Just popping in here but I agree with Fay. You are seeing possible early autism spectrum signs. Our pediatrician blew off my concerns for a long time, and I wanted her to be right, and we delayed intervention. I regret that now. It would be amazing to be able to start something like floortime or even RDI with an infant that young..amazing!<br>
Just to be specific, the not lifting hands to be picked up (he did do this but was way delayed) was a first sign of my son's. Other issues are the tuning out, not responding consistently to his name, and you seem to need to work to engage and keep him engaged.<br>
It is too young for dx. but not for intervention. If you intervene and then the child turns out to be typical no harm done (and since already his communication and engagement aren't typical it is going to help whether he turns out to be on the spectrum or not). If you wait you have lost time in my opinion.<br>
I'd probably get educated in floortime at this point.<br>
My son really responded to floor time. We made a connection and to this day he loves to share experiences with us and I relate it to floor time--which we started about 12 to 13 months. You will enjoy it as will he.<br>
Your son is very fortunate you are willing to consider that something might be needed. It is easy to be in denial for most of us!
 

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Not being able to communicate or interact is a huge red flag. A baby should interact actively with you and "communicate" in some way that he wants more whether it be feeding, more peek-aboo, etc. Appearing to not hear when you call his name is also a big red flat. Usually, they won't hear you call their name but will turn at a crinkly toy, etc. DS1 showed signs early as an infant and was diagnosed with autism. He is 5 1/2 yo now and is doing wonderfully. He will be going to regular kindergarten without any classroom supports. We will just watch to see if he has any difficulties. Early intervention is really important and it wouldn't hurt.<br><br>
Right now, try to enter his world and get him to enter your world as much as possible. Play with him as much as possible.
 

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I would read the book "First Feelings" by Stanley Greenspan - he's written a ton about autism spectrum, and floortime as a way to engage children. First Feelings is about typical development, but it gives good things you can do to engage your child, and "woo" him into a relationship with you.<br><br>
Your pediatrician is an idiot by the way, as far as language development goes. I would DEMAND a hearing test first and foremost (if he's got fluid in his ears, it could severely delay his language comprehension) and then ask for an eval by either a developmental pediatrician or a early intervention if his hearing is normal. Not babbling and not responding to his name are big red flags. The not babbling is DEFINITELY something that is atypical at this age.<br><br>
Trust your mommy instinct on this one.
 

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I would also demand a referral. They can do a sedated hearing test to see exactly where his hearing is to make sure there isn't a loss of any kind or check for a physical delay in something being heard and his brain receiving the information. They can also do some vision tests to make sure he is seeing, but make sure you go to somebody who is very used to dealing with babies.<br><br>
I commend you for recognizing that there might be some issues. I was deep in denial when my babe was that age.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TereasaT</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7924744"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Usually, they won't hear you call their name but will turn at a crinkly toy, etc.</div>
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He totally does that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I was saying his name repeatedly and he didn't even bother looking up from his toy. As soon as I shook a rattle he looked for it.<br><br>
He has had fluid in his ears A LOT. He's actually having tubes put in next week. Even if he couldn't hear well he still should be interacting more when you're looking directly at him I would think. It isn't that he's completely non-vocal because he isn't. He can actually be pretty loud if he wants to be it's just that all those noises are screams or yelling, no form of language at all.
 

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I would call your local EI for an evaluation - you don't need a doctor's referral for that at least.<br><br>
And I would pester the heck out of him for a hearing test. What I learned is that there are different levels of hearing. So he could hear one thing but not another. Or b/c of fluid in the ears, he'll have good hearing moments and bad ones. This has actually happened to my oldest. He has seasonal allergies, which apparently caused fluid to block up his ears spring and fall. How did I find this out? He kept failing hearing tests at school only to pass them at the health dept. The health dept worker actually made the connection about the fluid in his ears and allergies. So we started him on allergy meds, which made everything a lot better.<br><br>
But I do know from experience the not babbling thing is a red flag that should get checked out. My dd didn't babble...it wasn't until she started babbling that I realized how quiet she'd been (the youngest of four, so I didn't notice b/c there was so much going around me, lol!) Anyway, she's not autistic, but does have <a href="http://www.apraxia-kids.org/" target="_blank">apraxia</a> and developmental delays of all sorts. But she's also sweet and smiley and just a little ray of sunshine in my life!
 

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I would definitely look into starting floortime or RDI. It sounds warranted at this point. And you might look into calling a developmental pediatrician or a consultant for either approach. Many autism experts might leap at the opportunity to work with a child that young. (And leap you over the waiting list as a result.)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Terabith</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7928509"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would definitely look into starting floortime or RDI. It sounds warranted at this point. And you might look into calling a developmental pediatrician or a consultant for either approach. Many autism experts might leap at the opportunity to work with a child that young. (And leap you over the waiting list as a result.)</div>
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What is RDI?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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I could tell by three months that my daughter might be autstic-- she is 19 months and still pretty much nonverbal (on a good day she does say "hello" and "mama") but hasn't been officially evaluated. But, she never made eye contact (still doesn't) and never responded to her name.<br><br>
There was a study just out... that the simple test of seeng if a baby responds to her name at 12 months can predict autism. My daughter did not respond to her name or anythng else spoken at 12 months, but around 15 months or so did start responding to her name.<br><br>
Does your DS make eye contact?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>meowee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7929111"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I could tell by three months that my daughter might be autstic-- she is 19 months and still pretty much nonverbal (on a good day she does say "hello" and "mama") but hasn't been officially evaluated. But, she never made eye contact (still doesn't) and never responded to her name.<br><br>
There was a study just out... that the simple test of seeng if a baby responds to her name at 12 months can predict autism. My daughter did not respond to her name or anythng else spoken at 12 months, but around 15 months or so did start responding to her name.<br><br>
Does your DS make eye contact?</div>
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He does make *some* eye contact but it's always very brief. I just posted a video and you can kind of see what I'm talking about in it.
 

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"He does make *some* eye contact but it's always very brief."<br><br>
you're so wise ot noitce this! It wans't until DS was 4 that the neuopsych told me that what I had called "eye contact" was actually abnormal and very fleeting. and it sure is now that I'm watching it for *quality*.<br>
Before I'd just said "eye contact- yep! check! he can do that!", nevermind how awkward and breif it is for him. So ahd his first pediatrician. sigh.<br><br>
I saw the video. It's a lot like him (AS) and baby brother (7m, unknown), what I can't recall is if it seems familair for NT sister or not. Go with your gut!
 
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