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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is truly at the heart of H and mine's disagreement. DS has had 3 distinct reactions to wheat in his life. First, as a newborn (then I cut out wheat, 6 days later ALL symptoms clear. I don't know how much more clear-cut that could get). Then later around 1yo when he was getting wheat at daycare, then just recently when we were trialing wheat and I gave him about 2-3 tbsp of wheat berries in one day and he threw up 3 times that night.

H thinks that since he has no noticeable reactions with smaller amounts, that smaller amounts are fine. I wholeheartedly disagree with this as we do not know what it may be doing to his insides, even if we can't see any outward signs (first full day of wheat trial a few weeks ago, his tummy did hurt that evening. Other than that no noticeable signs (not even red ring rash) until he got the wheat berries and then threw up. He did actually get the red ring rash last week with oatmeal.

Questions:

--why was he showing no outward signs for almost 3 weeks (except the first day when I estimate that he DID ingest more wheat than on the other days, then his tummy hurt) and then when I feed him the wheat berries (pure form of wheat) he has a strong reaction?

--are there any scientific studies that go over this sort of thing? If he ingests smaller amounts of processed wheat and shows no signs of irritation, how do I know it's not doing any internal or long term damage?

I'm trying to find out more info but there doesn't seem to be much scientific stuff out there.
 

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I am no doctor, so take this with a grain of salt.

The wheat is internal first, the small amount ARE doing something internally. Villi damage! You cant SEE that. Its going to start on the inside, and work its way out. If he is sensitive to it, I wouldnt give him any. To me it only makes sense that if someone is sensitive, even if you cant SEE it on the outside, it is doing SOMETHING on the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, that is exactly what I am trying to find, PROOF that it may be doing something internally even if you cannot see it.
I knew the villi are damaged in celiac disease, but they are also damaged with allergies or intolerances?
 

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It is called food protein induced enteropathy.

From medscape:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/931548-diagnosis

Quote:
Nonceliac food-induced enteropathy
The results of both IgE-specific tests (ie, prick, RAST) are usually normal.
The findings of the jejunal biopsy are similar to those in celiac disease but usually are less pronounced. A varying degree of villous atrophy is present, with crypt hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Often, the lesions have a patchy distribution, observed especially in the last few years. Several studies have detected increased numbers of IgE plasmocytes in biopsy specimens of patients with cow's milk protein intolerance.
 

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Here's another reference from (note the text I bolded):

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pag...78&pageindex=1

Quote:
At least six commonly ingested proteins can induce gastrointestinal symptoms and/or small intestinal mucosal damage - namely gluten, cow's milk protein, soya protein, chicken protein, fish protein, and rice protein. With the exception of gluten, the 'intolerance' is generally accepted as being transient, resolving spontaneously by the age of approximately 2 years...
You'll see later in the article, a description of reintroducing food to a girl to see if she had outgrown her allergy, and biopsies showed damage prior to her having symptoms.
 

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Excellent references. I printed them out (and hopefully DH will read them).

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! I'm not sure I quite understand the first link but I understand the second one a little better. I'm researching "food protein induced enteropathy".
The first link seems to say that it spontaneously resolves itself by two years of age but that hasn't happened with DS.
How would I find out if he has this FPIE? More tests?
 
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