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I was wondering if anyone is familiar with the Rhogam shot and adverse effects. I am still trying to figure out why I had reactions to it and now I am pregnant again and my doctor wants to administer the shot sooner than later.
As far as I understand it is possible to wait until after birth to see if a) the baby is Rh negative or not and b) If antibodies were even produced.
According to a German article 3/4 of children are Rh negative and the ones that are not are often unaffected and no blood mixing occured or antibodies were produced.
http://www.impfkritik.de/front_content.php?idart=2082&idcat=2

I don't know how common it is to wait until after birth so I fear my doctor will think I am just plain crazy. I really have no idea how to bring my concerns across.

I was hoping someone here would know a bit more

I have reacted and experienced damage from all sorts of vaccines and nowadays don't vaccinate at all and my health greatly improved. Aside from an immediate health decline (fevers and chromic indigestion with bloody stools) the worst part for me were the speech problems and brain fog. It really ruined my life and my ability to suceed at work.
 
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35 yrs ago tomorrow, my homebirth doctor took a sample of my cord blood and sent it out to the lab. IF there were any incidence of blood mixing, a midwife would have come out within 72 hours to give me the rhogam shot. I never needed it. I have a DU factor that compensates for my Rh-. But he did the test just in case.

If the doctor does not cut the cord so soon, and waits for the pulsing to stop, that would avoid any blood mixing as the baby will get its blood and you yours. IF the cord is cut too soon some of the mother's blood can get in there and mixed. This is an example of an intervention that necessitates another intervention.

I do not know why you reacted to the rhogam, but maybe you should have the lot and batch number in your records and the reaction noted in detail that you had. Doctors like to blame patients for the reactions that occur with the medicines that doctors give to patients. You could have had a bad batch, but who knows. Do you have a DU factor?

Rhogam protects the next baby, not the present one.

The mercury in Rhogam was supposed to have been stopped as of 1999, but there was no recall, so the supplies were still on the shelves and given to moms until the batches ran out.

You can also get a ABO blood incompatibility, but they are rare.

The shot at 28 weeks is in case you fall or have some kind of accident. The birth dose is the one that is important.

In recent years since the AIDS virus uproar, doctors have been reluctant to inform their patients that rhogam is a human blood product. No case of AIDS has ever been traced to a dose of rhogam, yet there is the theoretical possibility that this could happen.

You may get more information from the birth professional forum and ask the midwives there who deal with this problem daily. They may have more definitive answers for you. http://www.mothering.com/forum/16938-birth-professionals/
 
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I don't receive Rhogam during pregnancy. I don't need the shot then, and the baby sure doesn't need the toxins. It does nothing to protect, as the incredibly wise design of pregnancy means that there is no blood exchange between mom and babies, unless some type of major trauma occurs. Then, all mothers should evaluate.

I wait for birth, and I have the cord blood tested for typing. This takes a matter of a couple of hours. I don't get my babies poked for anything, so a quick blood typing (and my OB is great and more than willing to follow my wishes) will reveal if it's even necessary at all. All my babies have been Rh positive (out of 10 children so far!) so I do receive one Rhogam injection after their birth, when typing is established.

We are a non-vaxing, non-vitamin K, no injection family. However, Rhogam is cut and dry for me, since it absolutely protects against blood incompatability in future pregnancies. Since we welcome more children, the risk is not worth it, and since all of my babies thus far have been positive, the chances of interaction are high.
 

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I would have faith in your placenta, it is very good at what it does.

The fear is that the immune system from mom will attack the blood from the baby killing it. Not true, in fact the placenta is what controls all of this. Nutrients, oxygen, antibodies, and different cell intervention is all supplied from the placenta to the small embryo. Even if there was Rh alloimmunisation it is extremely rare the placenta will allow such passage.

Normal medical practice is to ask the mother her blood type as well as the father. This determination is bad policy, you can request a amniocentesis and they can tell you exactly what is going on.

"I don't know how common it is to wait until after birth so I fear my doctor will think I am just plain crazy." Never fear your doctor, he is there to help and guide you. If you have mistrust in your doctor you should find another one. If the doctor is forceful and degrading, you should find another one. Always think outside the box, millions of different species birth each day. It's proven.
 

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IF the mother is Rh-, they do not care what the father's blood type is since the doctor often assumes that there is a possibility that the baby is not the father's.

That is the truth.

That is also the reason that the eye drops are given - even though all moms are checked for gonorrhea.

The hospital does not know who you slept with last night, so the baby is given the eye drops, just in case.

Amniocentisis procedures have their own large galaxy of side effects as miscarriage, amnionitis, dimpling of the baby's skin, and infection.
 

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I have recently read that there is a test like the materniT21 test that determines if the baby is + or -. I plan on asking my ob next time Im pregnant. Last time I just got it with out really thinking about it. Dd was - though so it was unnecessary, I would like to avoid it next time.
 

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I don't receive Rhogam during pregnancy. I don't need the shot then, and the baby sure doesn't need the toxins. It does nothing to protect, as the incredibly wise design of pregnancy means that there is no blood exchange between mom and babies, unless some type of major trauma occurs. Then, all mothers should evaluate.

I wait for birth, and I have the cord blood tested for typing. This takes a matter of a couple of hours. I don't get my babies poked for anything, so a quick blood typing (and my OB is great and more than willing to follow my wishes) will reveal if it's even necessary at all. All my babies have been Rh positive (out of 10 children so far!) so I do receive one Rhogam injection after their birth, when typing is established.

We are a non-vaxing, non-vitamin K, no injection family. However, Rhogam is cut and dry for me, since it absolutely protects against blood incompatability in future pregnancies. Since we welcome more children, the risk is not worth it, and since all of my babies thus far have been positive, the chances of interaction are high.
This is exactly what I do. No shot during pregnancy, test the baby afterward, then take the shot. All six of my babies are Rh positive.
 

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I would have faith in your placenta, it is very good at what it does.

The fear is that the immune system from mom will attack the blood from the baby killing it. Not true, in fact the placenta is what controls all of this. Nutrients, oxygen, antibodies, and different cell intervention is all supplied from the placenta to the small embryo. Even if there was Rh alloimmunisation it is extremely rare the placenta will allow such passage.
I'm sorry but this is not my experience, nor that of many others I know. I've been through two sensitised pregnancies and experienced the results of Rh disease on my children, who were in fact, incredibly lucky to only require hospitalisation for their pathological jaundice and none of the other interventions (prenatal intrauterine transfusions, postnatal transfusions, plasmapheresis, IVIG therapy) that many other isoimmunised babies require. Some of the mothers on our online BG have had their children in and out of hospital for weeks or months afterwards until they are no longer at risk of HDN and their blood counts stabilise. We've even had a few losses our the years with mothers with extremely high titres whose babies were either too early (under 19w) to make it to the transfusion stage or others whose babies died from the complications of their intrauterine transfusions.

As mentioned, I was really fortunate even though the paediatricians were concerned with my son whose bili counts kept rising even while he was under double bili lights.

As for the OP, you can wait until after the baby is born and have him or her typed and then decide. You have about 72 hours. I'm not sure how long it takes for them to do an antibody screen, but if it's longer than 72 hours, then you might miss the safety window for the Rhogam shot.

Keep in mind that if you have a screen after the Rhogam shot, you might end up with a false positive and require subsequent testing.

My OB included a screen on Rh neg mothers at the start of the subsequent pregnancies, not at delivery. That was how we found out I'd been sensitised. Turns out I had a silent bleed in the third trimester of my previous pregnancy (no symptoms of bleeding whatsoever) that my prenatal Rhogam did not counteract. So, it is possible to be sensitised without knowing it or without any visible trauma or accident.

Has your partner been typed at all? If he's Rh negative, then there's not much to discuss (ie. you shouldn't need the shot unless he's got some unusual weak D stuff going on that makes him appear Rh neg even if he's technically positive). Even if he's Rh positive, if he's heterozygous for D you know that you have a 50% chance of a Rh negative baby, and I guess it depends on how you feel playing the odds. My husband is homozygous for D, so it was just terrible luck for us in that regard.

PS After my experience, my take on Rhogam is this. It's a tool. It's great when it works (imagine I said that without sounding too snide). You can decide if and when you want to make use of it. If you do, there are slight risks due to it being a blood product (the product info sheet makes reference to this). If you refuse, there are also risks (including sensitisation and that you might end up requiring interventions for your subsequent children that also involve blood products). So, as with vaccine decisions, it's based on personal preference and risk tolerance.
 

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I'm sorry but this is not my experience, nor that of many others I know. I've been through two sensitised pregnancies and experienced the results of Rh disease on my children, who were in fact, incredibly lucky to only require hospitalisation for their pathological jaundice and none of the other interventions (prenatal intrauterine transfusions, postnatal transfusions, plasmapheresis, IVIG therapy) that many other isoimmunised babies require. Some of the mothers on our online BG have had their children in and out of hospital for weeks or months afterwards until they are no longer at risk of HDN and their blood counts stabilise. We've even had a few losses our the years with mothers with extremely high titres whose babies were either too early (under 19w) to make it to the transfusion stage or others whose babies died from the complications of their intrauterine transfusions.

As mentioned, I was really fortunate even though the paediatricians were concerned with my son whose bili counts kept rising even while he was under double bili lights.

As for the OP, you can wait until after the baby is born and have him or her typed and then decide. You have about 72 hours. I'm not sure how long it takes for them to do an antibody screen, but if it's longer than 72 hours, then you might miss the safety window for the Rhogam shot.

Keep in mind that if you have a screen after the Rhogam shot, you might end up with a false positive and require subsequent testing.

My OB included a screen on Rh neg mothers at the start of the subsequent pregnancies, not at delivery. That was how we found out I'd been sensitised. Turns out I had a silent bleed in the third trimester of my previous pregnancy (no symptoms of bleeding whatsoever) that my prenatal Rhogam did not counteract. So, it is possible to be sensitised without knowing it or without any visible trauma or accident.

Has your partner been typed at all? If he's Rh negative, then there's not much to discuss (ie. you shouldn't need the shot unless he's got some unusual weak D stuff going on that makes him appear Rh neg even if he's technically positive). Even if he's Rh positive, if he's heterozygous for D you know that you have a 50% chance of a Rh negative baby, and I guess it depends on how you feel playing the odds. My husband is homozygous for D, so it was just terrible luck for us in that regard.

PS After my experience, my take on Rhogam is this. It's a tool. It's great when it works (imagine I said that without sounding too snide). You can decide if and when you want to make use of it. If you do, there are slight risks due to it being a blood product (the product info sheet makes reference to this). If you refuse, there are also risks (including sensitisation and that you might end up requiring interventions for your subsequent children that also involve blood products). So, as with vaccine decisions, it's based on personal preference and risk tolerance.
A lot of what you describe to me is not uncommon, sometimes you hear about the other end of it as well. A lot of this also has to do with today’s medical practice, at the roots.
 

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A lot of what you describe to me is not uncommon, sometimes you hear about the other end of it as well. A lot of this also has to do with today’s medical practice, at the roots.
No doubt there's many aspects of today's OB practice that could use a review in terms of best practice. Unfortunately, when you move into the high risk category because of isoimmunisation and Rh disease, a lot of those interventions become necessary just to get a seriously anaemic foetus through to the 34-week mark and early delivery. I'm glad that on the scale of how serious iso pregnancies can be, mine were relatively uneventful with just fortnightly monitoring, but that was the point of the monitoring: things can go south very quickly. I felt for the mums on our BG who were doing IUTs starting around 19-20w and just hoping that their baby would stabilise enough to make it through to the next transfusion.

If Rhogam works (well, most of the time) to prevent this, then it's worth considering. BTW I was with a midwife and supposed to have a home birth when I became sensitised. Home birth was no longer an option once dealing with Rh disease.
 
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