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OK, I find myself and df telling dd "no" a lot. I don't like it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: She's almost 7 months old, she's crawling and cruising and exploring. She also like to pinch and "play with" (pull) hair, hard. So, help me here. What is wrong with "no" and how do I lessen/cease telling her "no"?
 

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Maybe it's time to baby proof your house and get rid of as many "no' situations as you can. Get a gate for the stairs, move any nick nacks or other breakable things, and make your home a place that is safe for her to explore.<br>
As far as the pulling hair etc.. you can say things like..."that hurts mama" and gently remove her hand.<br>
I do think an occasional stern "NO" is ok in a dangerous situation or something, but I think alternatives are nice so your not running around "no, no, no" all of the time.
 

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I was really worried about saying "no" too much before my dd was born. Turns out, I just created a room that she can't go into (the door is always closed) and put anything I didn't want her to get into in there. I put a gate up at the kitchen and just picked everything up. I also don't care if she gets into a lot of stuff that most people care about. I don't care if she gnaws on the remote, if she pulls all the cd's, books, and movies off the shelves, if she dumps over the laundry basket a hundred times. It's all about picking battles and at this age there shouldn't even be any battles. Your dd should be free to explore without you having to hold her back by saying no all the time. As far as the hair pulling? My dd does it too. I just keep her hands away from my hair and when she pulls it, I call for my husband and say to her "please let go of mommys hair, honey, that hurts mommy" and then when I'm am let free I always thank her for letting go (even if we had to pry her fingers off of me :LOL )<br>
I would just start with moving everything out of her way and then go from there. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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'No' can be problematic if overused--but, also b/c it is so open-ended. We used "STOP!" and found that to be a more concrete command (and more accurate, as that's really what you are wanting.)<br><br>
Weren't there some studies linking the use of 'no' and children's development? Does anyone know what I'm talking about? I'm sure it's not definitive and there were other things going on, but anyway....<br><br>
Also, the more they hear 'no' the more YOU will hear 'no' later on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
But, most importantly, children exploring their environment is a critical part of their development--the more they can freely do this the better it is for them. So, as people have suggested, baby proof and make it a real 'yes' environment.<br><br>
Obviously, some things can't be taken out--like you still might need your lamps for light--but there are so many ways to help your baby safely explore a lamp (or dog dish, or whatever) so that you're not in the position of saying 'no' frequently.<br><br>
We found a big plastic gate (supposed to be a 'play yard' (?) that encircled the baby), but we stretched it out and put it around the entertainment center that had open shelves and CDs. Made that a non-issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cmb123</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Maybe it's time to baby proof your house and get rid of as many "no' situations as you can.</div>
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I definately agree with this, and have been slowly making progress on that front. We blocked our fireplace (with a couch lol) because I knew it would be an attention grabber and just isn't safe. We don't have any stairs in our apartment, so thankfully thats not an issue. Keyboards are a big fascination for her, so having her in my lap while I"m at the computer can be frustrating, and that's an instance I find myself telling her "no" although I know she's doing nothing wrong, and my "no" is out of frustration. We don't mind if she dumps baskets, empties shelves, etc Daddy's glasses generate a lot of "no"s because she likes to pull them off of his face (she's good at breaking eyeglasses so we have to stay on top of that one!). If we're in the kitchen I try to keep the cat food/water out of reach so that's not an issue.<br><br>
I guess it's a matter of eliminating "no" situations and redirecting. I think I knew that already :LOL
 

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Our DD went through a big hair pulling phase from about 6-9 months. She squealed with delight each and every time she got a handful of my (or the cats') hair. We were consistent with "gentle hands" rather than "no" and now she's very good about giving gentle pats rather than root-wrenching pulls.<br><br>
No applies to soooooo many situations that if there's an alternative I'd rather use that - save the "no" for danger.
 
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