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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there!<br>
A dear friend has offered to make me some adorable baby things from a pattern book (Boho Baby Knits) for the upcoming little one but she's going to use the yarn she has sitting around the house. She doesn't know a lot about knitting (other than how to do it) and I know NOTHING about it but she asked me to try to figure out her yarn situation since she'll be doing the hard work<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">.<br>
She has a bunch of yarn from a relative to use up and she can't figure out if she needs to double it up or what, so I am hoping if I post the stats for the yarn and the stats for the pattern one of you can figure it out for us!<br><br>
Here's the yarn info:<br>
Bouquet brand Sock & Sweater 50g fingering weight<br>
80% wool-20% nylon, shrink treated machine washable<br>
"the tension achieved by the average knitter is 14 sts and 18 rows to 5cm (2 inches) using size 3.25 mm (Canadian size 10, American size 3) needles measured over stocking stitch"<br><br>
Here's the pattern requirements:<br>
Materials:<br>
Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Quatro,<br>
100% wool (220 yd/201 m per 100g skein), 1 skein of each colour to make both bloomers and topper<br><br>
1 set us #6 (4mm) double pointed needles<br>
1 set IS #7 (4.5mm) double-pointed needles (topper only)<br>
one 16" (40cm) US #7 (4.5mm) circular needle<br><br>
then Gauge:<br>
20 stitches and 24 rows= 4" (10cm) in stockinette stitch, using US #7 (4.5mm) needle.<br><br>
IT also lists finished sizes and measurements and yarn colours. I don't *think* you need any of that info to help us figure this out <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br>
any advice would be appreciated!!
 

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Doubling it might work, she would have to try a swatch to see whether she can get the required gauge that way.<br><br>
ETA:<br><br>
In more detail, that means:<br>
Take US 7 needles and double the yarn, knit a small square. Measure the gauge you get. If it is 20 sts = 4" and the fabric doesn't look really loose or tight, great, use this yarn. If it is just under 20 sts try a new square using smaller needles. If it is just over 20 sts try a new square using bigger needles. If it is really far off or looks bad knitted at that gauge (way too loose or too tight) then the yarn is not going to work for this project (unless you are skilled enough to modify the pattern, which doesn't sound like it is the case).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! While most of what you said means very little to me, my friend seems to think it means she might be on the right track!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kyamo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15441299"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Doubling it might work, she would have to try a swatch to see whether she can get the required gauge that way.<br><br>
ETA:<br><br>
In more detail, that means:<br>
Take US 7 needles and double the yarn, knit a small square. Measure the gauge you get. If it is 20 sts = 4" and the fabric doesn't look really loose or tight, great, use this yarn. If it is just under 20 sts try a new square using smaller needles. If it is just over 20 sts try a new square using bigger needles. If it is really far off or looks bad knitted at that gauge (way too loose or too tight) then the yarn is not going to work for this project (unless you are skilled enough to modify the pattern, which doesn't sound like it is the case).</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I second this! Also, depending on what needles she wants to use, you can use the #3 that the yarn calls for and just increase the stitch count alternatively to accomodate for the lighter weight yarn. i.e. if her gauge for this yarn as is on # 3 is 6 sts/1" she can cast on 66 sts instead of the called for 56 sts at 5 sts/1" gauge (both will equal about 11" around)...just an example. It depends on how sturdy she wants the finished item. Using 3s will make it more lightweight. HTH
 
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