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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are sure that our dd has inherited her grandpa's/Mama's seasonal grass & pollen allergy.It presents itself as a persistently runny nose/scratchy throat & raspy cough. Currently we have been using benadryl and other infant antihistamines that we were directed to use by our ped. but I am not a medical person, I think they aren't working, and I would really like to find a more natural (but not massively complicated or expensive) remedy. We have access to some very nice healthfood stores here and are really looking for some good suggestions. DD would be outside most of the day of left to her own devices, and I like to encourage that.
 

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Anecdotally I hear good things about eating unpasturized local honey. We do this in our family and it seems to help. The theory is it works like a natural allergy shot.

Here is a quick article about it:

Local Honey and Allergies
By Tom Ogren

Honey contains bits and pieces of pollen and honey, and as an immune system booster, it is quite powerful.

Allergies arise from continuous over-exposure to the same allergens. If, for example, you live in an area where there is a great deal of red clover growing, and if in addition you often feed red clover hay to your own horses or cattle, then it likely you are exposed over and over to pollen from this same red clover. Now, red clover pollen is not especially allergenic but still, with time, a serious allergy to it can easily arise.

Another example: if you lived in a southern area where bottlebrush trees were frequently used in the landscapes or perhaps you had a bottlebrush tree growing in your own yard, your odds of over-exposure to this tree's tiny, triangular, and potently very allergenic pollen is greatly enhanced.

In the two examples used above, both species of plants are what we call amphipilous, meaning they are pollinated by both insects and by the wind. Honeybees will collect pollen from each of these species and it will be present in small amounts in honey that was gathered by bees that were working areas where these species are growing. When people living in these same areas eat honey that was produced in that environment, the honey will often act as an immune booster. The good effects of this local honey are best when the honey is taken a little bit (a couple of teaspoons-full) a day for several months prior to the pollen season.

When I'm asked how local should the honey be for allergy prevention I always advise to get honey that was raised closest to where you live, the closer the better since it will have more of exactly what you'll need.

It may seem odd that straight exposure to pollen often triggers allergies but that exposure to pollen in the honey usually has the opposite effect. But this is typically what we see. In honey the allergens are delivered in small, manageable doses and the effect over time is very much like that from undergoing a whole series of allergy immunology injections. The major difference though is that the honey is a lot easier to take and it is certainly a lot less expensive. I am always surprised that this powerful health benefit of local honey is not more widely understood, as it is simple, easy, and often surprisingly effective.
 

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Agree with the above poster. It needs to be raw honey not processed and it should be from your locality.

Your dd is probably too young for a neti pot but I really recommend that as well. I know it clears up my seasonal allergies so that I haven't had to take any OTC or prescription medication.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mamimapster
....It presents itself as a persistently runny nose/scratchy throat & raspy cough. Currently we have been using benadryl and other infant antihistamines that we were directed to use by our ped. but I am not a medical person, I think they aren't working, and I would really like to find a more natural (but not massively complicated or expensive) remedy. .

I don't have any advice for ya, my oldest dd will b 11yo(yikes) next month, and also suffers from 'hay fever' & such....she also breaks out in a slight rash that is mostly just itchy whenever she rolls around in the grass a lot. The honey treatment makes sooooo much sense & we will have to try that. She hates taking any kind of meds...and I don't much like giving them to her....not to mention that benedryl type things don't seem to help much.

thanks for the info!
 

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It's basically a way of giving your sinuses a saline bath to remove the allergens that might be there

neti pot link

I started using mine during pregnancy when I wanted to stop taking drugs for my allergies but was still getting sinus headaches. Saline solution alone and steam baths did little to help but this did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow! I just have to say that is an awsome link. We have a farmers market happening here this weekend and we're going to try and pick up some local honey. Also, this (the neti pot thing) is something that our AWESOME ped had us doing a variation on when our DD was just a very stuffy babe (she was born congested), He had us using a saline solution on her in conjunction with one of those nose bulb things. I remember this workign very well, and I'm going to try and find a way top modify it for my dd. I'm forwarding this to my DP so that she can check into the neti pot for herself as well, since we all have various sinus problems in this house.
 
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