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I was thinking about introducing some stories or nonpicture books to DS1. Maybe reading a story where we can use lots of different voices/sounds and we can act out together? He is using his imagination now and I thought this would be fun. He is also very interested in the books I am reading, flipping through them and looking at the pages - <i>No there aren't any pictures in them either</i>!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Any suggestions?<br>
Thanks,<br>
SJ
 

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At that age, my daughter didn't want to listen to me read books without pictures, but she LOOOOVED it when I made up stories for her. I did a whole series about Bob the Baby Unicorn that was very popular, and then there were just random stories about her going on adventures with fairies, her learning that the cat could talk and going on adventures with the cat, her meeting Dora the Explorer, ad nauseam. I also retold a lot of fairy tales if we didn't happen to have a book version handy -- three little pigs, billy goats gruff, all the good stuff.<br><br>
She really liked it when I consulted her for plot points, or we took turns saying what happened next.
 

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I 2nd Fairy Tales. All my boys loved them at very young ages, even without pictures. In fact, my 11 year old still prefers them.<br><br><br><br>
Blessings,
 

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I second making up stories...dp and ds just finished up a series on Noodle and Stroodle, two troublesome secret agents. Ds 4 was telling them most often. What a hoot!<br><br>
Here's a good site with tips on storytelling... <a href="http://www.family.org/parenting/A000000415.cfm" target="_blank">Ideas for Making Up Stories</a><br><br>
Have fun!!
 

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I just asked my librarian the same question. She recommended A to Z Mysteries. I checked one out to read to the kids before bed (having picture books at that time hypes them up). However, I'm not sure that a mystery is the best idea for my sensitive 3 year old so I'll be pre-reading it before I read it to them. I'd like to find a nice chapter book at the same level without all the suspense.
 

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A to Z Mysteries for a toddler? Even the brightest toddler just isn't going to be ready for them. My kids read them around 5, 6yo, but they were reading by themselves already. When we started with chapter books (my oldest was 4 when I started reading them to him) we read the "My Father's Dragon" books, and the "Magic Treehouse" series they enjoyed, too ... and they both have some pictures.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Am agreeing with the PP who said a toddler will enjoy a book with pictures more. You want voices? Good, use them with the stories. Old classics like "Blueberries for Sal" and "Make Way for Ducklings," just as the easiest examples, give you lots of opportunity for acting, or any good story picture book. And when you're not reading them, they can sit and look at the pictures and remember the story, which is good for reading readiness (associating a particular image with particular words).<br><br><br><br><br>
Some Dr. Seuss stories, the ones with characters interacting, not just a narrator, are good for voice acting (examples being that "Yertle the Turtle" is characters interacting, "Red Fish Blue Fish" is *not*).<br><br><br><br><br>
To the OP, your DS loves flipping through your books because you love flipping through them. He's being like you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> His favorite thing to be (for now <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">). But it's not a sign that he's ready for nonpicture books.<br><br><br><br>
Making up stories is perfect if you don't want the distraction of page turning, etc. My kids love that, too, when we're all in bed and sliding off to sleep, sometimes I used to quietly tell stores.<br><br><br><br><br>
The best thing to do is read read read to them anything that comes along anyway. And they'll want to do it themselves so much that it'll come naturally at some point. There's nothing in this world so satisfying as watching your kids curled up all over the house absorbed in their books. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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