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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some one on here said she had not gotten the normal "newborn" things done like the PKU test. Well, I would love to not have that done on my next child (it was very tramatic when they did it to my dd), but I thought it was a state law that it had to be done. Is there a way to get around it? I'll cross post this on the midwife board to see if they know.<br>
Thanks!
 

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You can opt out of all the newborn screening. In my state, MA all you have to do is claim the religious exemption and refuse to sign the form. (They may give you a waiver form to sign instead to cover their you-know-whats).<br><br>
Hope this helps.
 

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In my state, FL, routine procedures can be waived if they go against your religious beliefs.<br><br>
383.04 Prophylactic required for eyes of infants.--Every physician, midwife, or other person in attendance at the birth of a child in the state is required to instill or have instilled into the eyes of the baby within 1 hour after birth an effective prophylactic recommended by the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics for the prevention of neonatal ophthalmia. This section does not apply to cases where the parents file with the physician, midwife, or other person in attendance at the birth of a child written objections on account of religious beliefs contrary to the use of drugs. In such case the physician, midwife, or other person in attendance shall maintain a record that such measures were or were not employed and attach thereto any written objection.<br><br>
I, Christine XXXXX, parent of baby XXXXX, object on account of my religious beliefs, to the use of prophylactics on my newborn.<br>
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383.14 Screening for metabolic disorders, other hereditary and congenital disorders, and environmental risk factors.--<br>
(1) SCREENING REQUIREMENTS.--To help ensure access to the maternal and child health care system, the Department of Health shall promote the screening of all infants born in Florida for phenylketonuria and other metabolic, hereditary, and congenital disorders known to result in significant impairment of health or intellect, as screening programs accepted by current medical practice become available and practical in the judgment of the department. The department shall also promote the identification and screening of all infants born in this state and their families for environmental risk factors such as low income, poor education, maternal and family stress, emotional instability, substance abuse, and other high-risk conditions associated with increased risk of infant mortality and morbidity to provide early intervention, remediation, and prevention services, including, but not limited to, parent support and training programs, home visitation, and case management. Identification, perinatal screening, and intervention efforts shall begin prior to and immediately following the birth of the child by the attending health care provider. Such efforts shall be conducted in hospitals, perinatal centers, county health departments, school health programs that provide prenatal care, and birthing centers, and reported to the Office of Vital Statistics.<br><br>
4) OBJECTIONS OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN.--The provisions of this section shall not apply when the parent or guardian of the child objects thereto. A written statement of such objection shall be presented to the physician or other person whose duty it is to administer and report tests and screenings under this section.<br><br>
I, Christine XXXX, parent of baby XXXX, object to screening for metabolic disorders, other hereditary and congenital disorders, and environmental risk factors.<br><br>
383.145 Newborn hearing screening.--<br>
(1) LEGISLATIVE INTENT.--The intent of this section is to provide a statewide comprehensive and coordinated interdisciplinary program of early hearing impairment screening, identification, and followup care for newborns. The goal is to screen all newborns for hearing impairment in order to alleviate the adverse effects of hearing loss on speech and language development, academic performance, and cognitive development. It is further the intent of the Legislature that the provisions of this act only be implemented to the extent that funds are specifically included in the General Appropriations Act for carrying out the purposes of this section.<br>
c) If the parent or legal guardian of the newborn objects to the screening, the screening must not be completed. In such case, the physician, midwife, or other person who is attending the newborn shall maintain a record that the screening has not been performed and attach a written objection that must be signed by the parent or guardian.<br><br>
I, Christine XXXX, parent of baby XXXX, object to the newborn hearing screening.<br>
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A quick note on the hearing test, I clapped my hands and my baby startled, I considered that a pass for the hearing test, and therefore no reason to administer another.<br>
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The above statutes and my objection statements were included in my birth plan. There is no law in FL that a newborn must have a Hep b injection, so I just had a statement no hep b shot to be given, included in my birth plan.<br><br>
Now I figured I would probably meet some resistance, going against the routine and all, so I had the foresight to make 5 copies of my plan, with each copy signed and dated next to each objection. (4 pages long). I put the 5 copies in my hospital bag. I had a couple more copies at home, and one I gave to the hospital during PRE-admission. So by the time I checked in to give birth, they should already have had a copy of my plan in my files. Well, they didn't seem to have it when I checked in. First copy lost already. I was a bit surprised that by the time I checked out of the hospital with my infant, I had given out ALL 5 COPIES I had in my bag. The labor nurse lost one, she's the one who insisted I could not decline those procedures, they were the law. I told her I knew that, but there were waivers available, and my signed statement of objection was included in my birthplan, and I gave her the first copy out of my bag. Copies kept getting lost, then I was berated by the pediatrician on call, had the nerve to ask if me if I loved my child. She was pushing the vit k and the eye goop. It was 2 hours after I gave birth, and she had already cornered my DH, who did not back down, then she said she would speak to me, he told her she would not change my mind. But she tried. She told me how the eye goop was only effective if given within the first hour after delivery (sounds like a used car salesman, this deal is only good if you sign right now!!), I looked at the clock, then looked at her and said, "I gave birth two hours ago, so I guess that one's out".<br><br>
She didn't miss a beat, went right to the vit k issue. Finally agreeing that she would bring the inserts to both and I would read them. When she came back after giving me time to read them, I pointed out the place in each insert where it was stated, "Do not give if allergic to any of the components..."<br><br>
"How do you know if he is allergic?" I asked her, "he was just born".<br><br>
She didn't have much to say after that. However, she did threaten to call a social worker (working with the hospital I guess), and at 9:00p that night, I got a visit. But she basically told me that the people at the hospital get a little worked up when you go against their routine. I guess she ruled out that I was making decisions incompetently.<br><br>
Sheesh. I never realized how hard it is to get a baby out of the hospital unscathed! I can see why some choose to have their babies at home. I wish I would have had some support for that choice!<br><br>
Anyway, just wanted to let you know how we handled it.
 

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Help me to understand this one, OK?<br><br>
I can see not wanting the eye goop or the vitamin K, but the newborn screen strikes me as kind of important -- especially for something like PKU, which is rare but manageable when it's caught very early.<br><br>
Do you object because it seems painful and nasty? And do you end up getting it when your baby is older, or just not bother?
 

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We did none of it. Had a nice peaceful homebirth and our midwife had a form to decline everything. Happy, healthy and unbothered 4 months later <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
-Angela
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CallMeIshmael</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Help me to understand this one, OK?<br><br>
I can see not wanting the eye goop or the vitamin K, but the newborn screen strikes me as kind of important -- especially for something like PKU, which is rare but manageable when it's caught very early.<br><br>
Do you object because it seems painful and nasty? And do you end up getting it when your baby is older, or just not bother?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Key words, rare<br><br><br><a href="http://members.kaiserpermanente.org/kpweb/healthency.do?body=mini/hw44745/hw44747&navtop=mini/hw44745/navtop.jsp&topic=Phenylketonuria+(PKU)" target="_blank">http://members.kaiserpermanente.org/...etonuria+(PKU)</a><br><br>
Topic Overview<br>
What is phenylketonuria (PKU)?<br>
Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a genetic disorder in which a baby lacks or has very low levels of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). This enzyme is necessary to convert phenylalanine, an amino acid, into another amino acid called tyrosine after protein is eaten. If PKU is not treated soon after birth, phenylalanine builds up in the bloodstream and brain tissue, causing mental retardation and central nervous system problems. If PKU is treated soon after birth, all or most of these problems can usually be prevented.<br><br>
In the United States, PKU is estimated to occur in 1 out of every 14,000 to 20,000 live births. It is more common in whites and Native Americans than in blacks, Hispanics, and Asians.<br><br>
If you have a family history of phenylketonuria, talk with your health professional about genetic testing. If you have a child with PKU, it may be helpful to get genetic counseling if you are considering having another child.<br><br>
What are the symptoms?<br>
Symptoms usually develop within a few months after birth, when phenylalanine has built up in a baby's system from consuming the protein in formula or breast milk. Before birth, the mother's body filters out the excess phenylalanine for the unborn baby.<br><br>
Early symptoms of PKU include a musty odor to the skin, hair, and urine. Babies may lose weight from vomiting and frequent diarrhea, be irritable, have skin problems, and be sensitive to light.<br><br>
If phenylalanine levels increase, an older child may develop unusual behavior, such as screaming episodes, repetitive rocking, head banging, and arm biting. The child may also have growth and developmental delays, frequent seizures, and if not treated, will become severely mentally retarded.<br>
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With this in mind, it seems to me that if something was wrong with my child, I would be the first to pick up on it, being that I spend the most time with him. That has been my observation over the past 20 years.<br><br>
I also find it odd that they want to test for PKU when it is so rare, yet heart defects occur in every 1 out of 100 babies, yet they don't routinely test for that.
 

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That's not the only test the run w/ that though. Many states have up to like 8 tests they run for rare genetic disorders that can be dangerous to baby if unknown. I have a friend who's son has galactosemia, occurs in only 1 in 60,000 or so births. I think it's 75% of those that are untreated die. Thankfully they found it and were able to change him to formula to fix the problems he was having. I am waiving the eye goop and Vit K, but will probably get the PKU at the first DRs appt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I will *possibly* get the one at the 2 week visit done since they were able to use a needle in her arm vein and draw out blood. I will not get the 3 day one though if possible. She was too small to get the arm one and they pricked her heel. I thought I was going to kill the midwife. My daughter was screaming bloody murder. She still hates her feet being touched.<br>
Would I still be able to claim exemption even though I'm not religous? Would I claim just like I would on shots?<br>
Thanks for all your help guys.
 

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We didn't need anything saying it was a religious objection, but we had a wonderful low-intervention homebirth midwife. [interesting side-bar, she HATES doing these and thinks it contributes to a hard first few days/weeks. In fact was upset when her daughter chose to do it on her baby...] I think if you're at home it's a lot easier to do things that are not the norm.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We're going to be at a birthing center again because my dh just doesn't want to do it at home. He liked the hotelness of the birthing center too much. I would rather just not have to go anywhere. Having to make that car ride back and forth 3 times during contractions was hell.
 

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We went ahead and got it in the hospital. There's a consent form so if you don't want it, don't sign it. At least that's how it works here.
 

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The only thing I had an option for was hep b. I was going to opt out of everything for #3 for the hospital and fight it. I ended up with a mw and here they are not exactly legal, so there is no eye stuff unless you want it, and no vit K and no blood draws. Nice, soooo nice.<br><br>
If you want out of the rare genetic dis testing, just be sure none of it runs in your family. And be aware of the signs and symptoms of a not so well newborn, just in case. It is better to have too much information than not enough.
 
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