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We finally got the results back from the psychoeducational assessment of my quirky son. I'm overwhelmed trying to process all the information, and am particularly wondering how much of the results to share with the school. Any thoughts would be appreciated. And, any good recommendations for resources about ADHD. (I'll be checking out the special needs forum in detail, too.)<br><br>
DH was upset with my decision of practitioner because I chose a gifted expert rather than someone cheap. I am so glad now that I did.<br><br>
The basic assessment is that he is 2E, gifted and ADHD. He wouldn't qualify for our district's congregated gifted program based on the IQ score he achieved on that testing day, but the psychologist believes that his ADHD resulted in substantial underreporting of his general cognitive abilities. The data in this regard are his scores on the Connor Scale, his behaviour during the test, and achievement scores well beyond what would have been expected given his IQ results.<br><br>
DS1's IQ subtest scores were all over the place . The one constant was that the tests which involved visual memory or fine-motor control were substantially lower than tests which were purely verbal and allowed him to answer orally. Since he is on a wait list for OT for his fine motor control, I am inclined to agree that tests which require these skills do not accurately reflect DS1's intellectual ability.<br><br>
DS1's achievement scores were also highly varied with grade equivalents ranging from late second grade through 8th grade.<br><br>
The psychologist thinks it is highly likely that by treating the ADHD and allowing for 2 more years of maturation, DS1 will qualify for the congregated gifted program when he is retested for it in 2 years. However, he made it clear that his assessment is that if DS1 doesn't qualify, it will be because the board's criteria is too narrow and not because DS1 wouldn't be better off in the gifted program.<br><br>
Having seen some of the recent studies of the effect of stimulants on the brain activity of patients with ADHD, I am interested in pursuing that path, especially since this psychologist explained why he has become a proponent of medication after having been the biggest voice against medication for years. But, DH is completely unwilling to consider it, so for now we will stick with non-medication options for treatment of the ADHD. This scares me at the moment because I do not believe that DS's teacher is able to provide the level of structure and support that he requires. I will be contacting the Special Education Resource Teacher on Monday to see if the ADHD diagnosis will enable her to do anything more than she is already doing to provide support for him.<br><br>
I have been reluctant to accept an ADHD diagnosis until now, but having seen the data from the assessment and having spoken with the psychologist in detail about how he interprets such data given the overlap of gifted and ADHD "symptoms", I am convinced that this is correct.
 

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I'd start by getting a copy of "The Mislabeled Child" by Brock Eide and Fernette Eide and reading the chapter on ADHD. They have suggestions for dealing with ADHD without meds.<br><br>
Martial arts can help with concentration. Our dojo has worked with a number of kids with ADHD who weren't on meds.<br><br>
A kid's psychologist (not a psychiatrist!) can help your son develop work around strategies for his ADHD.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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I had my (then grade 2) middle child tested - and the results came back as gifted and ADHD.<br><br>
I have a tendancy to think ADHD is overdiagnosed in gifted children....or perhaps that pychologists are trained to look for patholgies, so they find them.<br><br>
I am also in Ontario, FWIW, and I know many children in ON are diagnosed with ADHD so it does make me a little skeptical of the label.<br><br>
This is not to say your child does not have ADHD, I would not know that, just know that ADHD is often misdiagnosed in gifted children. Do some more research, mama, and see whether the diagnosis really fits.<br><br>
As per help with ADHD or ADHD like symptoms, I do not really know. The following are often explored:<br><br>
diet<br>
sleep<br>
structure and rythym to day<br>
exercise<br>
bouncy chairs in classrooms/ worry rocks to play with when antsy, etc. Some kids just have to move - and if they have a positive, non distracting way to do it - so much the better!<br>
visual organisation/remonder cues - example a picture at the door showing what he needs to go outside (backpack, shoes, coat)<br><br>
My oldest child (who is a lot older than yours!) uses coffee to help regulate his spaciness. I read that coffee is a substitiute for low level doses of Ritalin in some people with mild ADHD. Once again, an area to research. Goodness know I love me some java, lol, and it helps me to focus.<br><br>
I tend to agree with your Dh on the medication issue. I would consider it, when (and all of the following have to be met):<br>
-I accepted the diagnosis<br>
-I had thoroughly researched the meds<br>
-I had tried alternate therapies and they did not work<br>
-The ADHD was regulalry and negatively impacting the childs life
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kathymuggle</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15411333"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This is not to say your child does not have ADHD, I would not know that, just know that ADHD is often misdiagnosed in gifted children. Do some more research, mama, and see whether the diagnosis really fits.</div>
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This is why I went to the psychologist I went to. I have been researching this for years and have been on the fence about whether what I saw was gifted plus ADHD or just gifted. I was confident that this psych would be able to distinguish between gifted without ADHD and gifted with ADHD. And, given the test results, I am entirely convinced.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hergrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15411367"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">. And, given the test results, I am entirely convinced.</div>
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Is your DH equally convinced? I am not asking because I sense doubt in your post, but more because it is important to know if parents are on the same page in order to know how to proceed.<br><br>
Edited to add: I do not mean to sound unsupportive. It is common knowledge that gifted children are misdiagnoses with ADHD, so it understanable I mentionned that you might want to question the diagnosis. You are the mom, however, and if you think the diagnosis fits, I will take that statement at face value.<br><br>
One more thought: Once upon a time my children did go to school, and I had no difficulties in getting the school to adress the ADHD type issues, but huge issues (for a variety of reason) in getting them differentiate the curriculum to account for giftedness. I have read other similar accounts online. You will want to focus on getting accomodations or differentiations for both giftedness and ADHD. Researching and getting clear on specific things you want from the school may be usefull. Good luck, mama!
 

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Our oldest was tested at 7.4 as well on IQ and achievement tests. She is not an ADHD kid although she does have some degree of SPD (overresponsiveness) that has not required OT. Her achievement scores ranged from 2nd grade to grade 18+ on the WJ-III. That degree of variance is not uncommon in young gifted kids in my understanding. She leveled out over the years (is now 11.5) and I would say that she is functioning at around 8th-10th grade equivalency for math (her weakest subject) and well post college in reading and writing (her stronger areas).<br><br>
Our youngest, on the other hand, has been tested twice on IQ and once on private achievement. The first IQ test at 7.5 put her at HG-PG and the second, at 8.5, at MG. Like your ds, her achievement scores were well above where they should have been if the second IQ tests were accurate. The psych, however, told us that she absolutely did not have ADHD or any other exceptionality beyond being MG. I still don't have a good explanation for the variance in her IQ, achievement, and behavior. Dh thinks that she is just lazy.<br><br>
I think that the other posters have given you good advice: make sure that you and dh can get on the same page in terms of how to proceed and try various approaches. In our experience, as well, it is hard to get accommodations in a school setting for either giftedness if the child is not achieving consistently very highly, or disabilities if the child is not performing below grade level. That is probably why 2e kids have such a hard time getting any of their exceptionalities recognized. Good luck as you move forward with this!
 

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Hi hergrace. I think we're parenting very similar boys <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. We don't have an FSIQ because of discrepancies within the IQ test. His subtests are scattered and don't align nicely with achievement scores. IIRC, his working memory was low and he would definitely have done worse on things that required any kind of written work (although I don't recall if his testing included this). He's 7.5 and was tested at 5.25 and I'm about to retest privately. DS meets the criteria for ADHD and SPD, and in his case I think he doesn't actually have ADHD but it's the giftedness OEs and SPD mixed with other stuff (below). He also has written output issues. Yeah, try explaining that to a new teacher in a minute and a half <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">.<br><br>
I have a whole lot of random ideas; I apologize in advance for their lack of order.<br><br>
ADHD - DS seems way more ADHD, impulsive and disregulated during allergy season. All winter the only place he looked ADHD was at school and occasionally a grocery store. Last week his behaviour tanked and I noticed a bunch of rashes and realized - it's his allergies. Started the antihistamines and other supps and saw an improvement. Forgot the antihistamine yesterday and had a major rage of rigid thinking and hyperactivity (at the grocery store!).<br><br>
I find that antihistamine, fatty acids, a multi vitamin, acidophilus and quercitin help. I regularly see people suggesting that diet and supps cured everything for their child but that has not been our experience. He's still a handful much of the time, but I find these particular supps meet a particular need in his body and there is research to back up their efficacy.<br><br>
I'm not <i>not</i> supporting the ADHD diagnosis, just suggesting some management strategies. Has he been evaluated by an OT? DS's sensory diet is our other major ADHD-type behaviour management strategy.<br><br>
Your son is six and in gr1 I think? DS is 7.5 and in gr2. Turning seven made a major difference - I've heard from others that 7 seems to be a transition point. We homeschooled gr1 because we couldn't find anything suitable for him and I think he benefited from not failing at conforming on a daily basis. He's a very independent person and he's benefited from some maturation and a new school with teachers and admin who a) like gifted kids; b) see every kid as an individual; c) provide extensive differentiation; d) use their SN resources very wisely and effectively. We would still be HSing if we hadn't found this school as I don't think DS is ready for a mainstream classroom.<br><br>
My suggestions for talking to the schools would include:<br>
-see if the psych can write a letter that paraphrases his findings with an emphasis on his professional opinion that this is a complicated kid that testing just isn't catching yet;<br>
-discuss alternate strategies, including those used for kids with sensory issues (includes a bumpy pillow to sit on, heavy work like taking loads of books back to the library) as these will all help whether he has spd or not;<br>
-if his academic performance is suffering, can he get resource time for those areas, particularly written output. Written output demands steadily increase and it's good to work on them earlier if it seems out of norm for a boy his age.<br><br>
In addition to the Webb Misdiagnosis book, I think the Eides' Mislabeled Child is a must-own and must-read. There's a whole lot in there about gifted kids, and ADHD, and written output.<br><br>
Have you had his vision checked by a developmental optometrist? Convergence insufficiency/strabismus behaviour checklists mirror ADHD behaviour checklists. DS can read grade levels above in spite of having CI. It's greatly improved, which is a piece of why I think he looks less ADHD now.<br><br>
More reading: executive functioning. ADHD is a manifestation of weak EF. I like Smart but Scattered, some of Adam Cox. I also liked Kids Caught in the Syndrome Mix, and I really, really like When the Labels Don't Fit. Most of these are available on google books.<br><br><a href="http://www.dradamcox.com/speaking/workshop_topics.html" target="_blank">http://www.dradamcox.com/speaking/workshop_topics.html</a><br><br>
Now, I have to go out and throw a ball with my "ADHD" kid <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>joensally</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412098"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hi hergrace. I think we're parenting very similar boys <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.</div>
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I think that every time you post.<br><br>
Thanks for the detailed list of things to look at.<br><br>
I have little hope for any improvement at school during the rest of this year as his current teacher is not a good match for him at all and has not followed through on the things she has said she would do. Luckily, the Special Education Resource Teacher and the Vice-Principal have had a good chance to get to know him and have a teacher in mind for next year that should be a much better fit - and, he likes her. I really like the SERT and she has worked hard to get as much help for DS as possible. I feel disingenuous trying to shape what she sees from the assessment, but I also know that just because she is great doesn't mean that I shouldn't worry about things going forward with the district.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hergrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412806"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think that every time you post.<br><br>
Thanks for the detailed list of things to look at.<br><br>
I have little hope for any improvement at school during the rest of this year as his current teacher is not a good match for him at all and has not followed through on the things she has said she would do. Luckily, the Special Education Resource Teacher and the Vice-Principal have had a good chance to get to know him and have a teacher in mind for next year that should be a much better fit - and, he likes her. I really like the SERT and she has worked hard to get as much help for DS as possible. <b>I feel disingenuous trying to shape what she sees from the assessment, but I also know that just because she is great doesn't mean that I shouldn't worry about things going forward with the district</b>.</div>
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You are your son's best advocate. You have consulted a specialist in the field who has given you a professional POV, and sharing that perspective helps your son.<br><br>
We're very lucky as there's never been a question with schools that DS is gifted and that some of his stuff is a manifestation of that, but I've had to fight all along the way to get multiple school staff to stop seeing ASD characteristics. ASD strategies are not generally useful for DS. I've had to advocate, advocate, advocate - and that's meant influencing school staff to see <i>DS</i> with his particular complexity, not a single label.<br><br>
Another two ideas - SuperFlex curriculum over the summer, and you could probably adapt it to use with the triplets as a fun game.<br><br>
The other is that there are studies that show some vigorous exercise at the beginning of the day increases focus and decreases hyperactivity. Can you walk to school for the rest of the year to see if that helps? Do you have a trampoline he could go on for 10-15 mins before school (assuming winter has left)? IIRC, he's a bear in the morning so I don't know if this is feasible, but it might be worth an experiment over these last weeks of school.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>joensally</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412912"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Another two ideas - SuperFlex curriculum over the summer, and you could probably adapt it to use with the triplets as a fun game.</div>
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SuperFlex over the summer had already been on the agenda.<br><br>
Which SuperFlex materials did you use? Did you use the Thinking About YOU Thinking About ME or just the Curriculum Package?<br><br>
I need to think about getting some more exercise in before school. He is actually getting up at a decent time now since we started using melatonin to help him get to sleep at a decent time at night. Unfortunately, he is not within walking distance of school - since he is bused out of area to the closest French Immersion school. I'm sure I can come up with something, though.
 
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