Mothering Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><span><b><br>
I wonder how is this done.<br>
For those of you who have little ones who can sit but are not yet mobile. (crawling, scooting)<br>
I mean on the one hand, I love that there is the constant opportunity to be with other kids. The social aspect of that really appeals to me.<br>
But...since they are not mobile, will they get "lost" in the melee of other mobile kids and be ignored?<br><br>
Any insight would be appreciated.<br><br>
BTW. Devon is 21 mos. can sit but not yet crawl. She is currently with grandma, who imo coddles her too much and does not challenge her too much. She still cradles her when she can sit.<br><br>
Anyway. TIA.<br></b></span><br><span><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Eat">:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,445 Posts
It really depends on the daycare.<br><br>
My opinion is that kids under 3 don't <i>need</i> the social aspects, typically developing or special needs. So, one-on-one care (if you can afford it), nanny-share or something similar might be a bit more challenging than grandma, but still what she needs.<br><br>
That being said, my kids started daycare at 2 1/2 and 1 1/2 respectively, because there was a place for them in the great, on-campus daycare at the university where I work.<br><br>
The place where my kids went had only 6 kids in the youngest class (6 to 12 months) where the kids were non-mobile. They had two full-time teachers, and usually a student worker or two as well. So, the kids had a lot of time in arms, or with direct attention. (Our dd started in the next class up, which had 8-10 kids, 2 teachers + 2 student workers.) They followed the philosophies of Magda Gerber (the Confident Baby), who is a firm believer in the ability of children to work things out for themselves. So, they got 'floor time' and time to explore and work things out themselves. But there was lots of attention, but not 'coddling'.<br><br>
I don't know what they would do with a child who isn't mobile, but is old enough to be with the mobile toddlers - my suspicion is that child would be included in the older group, and helped to maneuver around as needed.<br><br>
Alas, there's not a single great solution. It really depends on the daycare, the teachers and the needs of your child.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
My mom works in a child care center, and they have had a couple babies/toddlers with special needs who were not yet mobile when they "aged out" of the infant room. For the most part, the children did very well in the toddler group. They could sit at the table and enjoy the sensory activities, sit for storytime, and enjoyed going outside in wagons/strollers. Mobility was more an issue for the teachers, I think (because of lifting) than for the children.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<span><b>Thanks for the input so far.<br><br>
I can imagine that this is a dilemma that has been dealt with before since there are quite a few of us here with kiddos that are dealing with physical stuff.</b></span><br><br><span><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Eat">:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,592 Posts
Well, I can tell you what would happen in the daycare I work in, but that doesn't mean it would happen in the daycare you're looking at.<br><br>
There is an infant room (6 weeks to around 12 months). When they hit 12 months and are doing well walking they get moved to the 1 year old room.<br><br>
I suspect if we had a 21 month old who was sitting but not crawling/walking yet s/he would still be put in the 1 year old room. Simple reason for this? A 21 month old would get very bored in the infant room. The toys aren't as cool as what's in the 1 year old room <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> In my particular daycare they wouldn't get lost or ignored. There are 2 big rugs in the middle of the room. Most of the time there's plenty of toys on that rug where the kids come and play (we try to keep the toys off the wood floor so the kids and adults aren't tripping on them and hurting themselves). A non-mobile child would probably be on the rug playing with the toys with the other kids, or in someone's arms or lap or whatever.<br><br>
I would strongly suggest you go check out the daycare- without your child with you- and see if you like it first. If it passes that step then ask to see it again- with your child. See how the teachers interact with her.<br><br>
If you decide to send her to a daycare- I would suggest you do constant "checks" at random times to see how she's doing. Not all daycares are nice and, unfortunately, some teachers *would* just leave a non-mobile child in the middle of the chaos of other toddlers, even if said child was unhappy or overwhelmed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
What about enrolling her in a pre-school that meets a couple times a week in the mornings and having grandma pick her up?<br><br>
That way grandma would not feel hurt AND she would get the social interaction she needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<span><b>Thanks for the awesome feedback.<br><br>
As much as I "don't like" and frankly don't trust the daycare scene, I just want Devon to not "lose out" on the social thing. As it is, she tend to get overwhelmed in busy places and will tune out or cries until someone picks her up. It is mentally exhausting. I have been taking her to B&N's kids section for some face to face, or face watching others. She enjoyed it. She was really digging that there are these small persons she could watch. She'd also "talk" (she's not verbal yet, lots of sounds) to them and about them. Its really cute.<br><br>
I just want to do the right thing. I AM afraid that she may freak out at daycare and cry. On the other hand, she may get used to it so it is hard to judge on the 1st. days.</b></span><br><br><span><b>Mary</b></span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Eat">:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
when i worked in a daycare there were two different kids that were not mobile - one about 18 mos and one 6 yrs. they spent a large part of the day in the infant room and were brought out to their age group for activities like circle times or art projects or lunch/nap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>aja-belly</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10279367"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">when i worked in a daycare there were two different kids that were not mobile - one about 18 mos and one 6 yrs. they spent a large part of the day in the infant room and were brought out to their age group for activities like circle times or art projects or lunch/nap.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
The thought of a 6 year old being stuck in the infant room makes me very sad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,102 Posts
If it's just socialization aspect of daycare, maybe there is another solution -- a play group or music/other activity class? Have you checked to see if there is anything in your area? If not, a local park or other place where moms congregate?<br><br>
Otherwise, as others have suggested, I'd check out the facility first to see if you liked it and then see how your daughter does.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kodama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10281257"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The thought of a 6 year old being stuck in the infant room makes me very sad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
it was very sad. i was the infant room teacher, and loved spending time with him, but he was obviously distressed about being stuck in there with us while the other kids played outside or whatever. it was a crappy situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,295 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Iris' Mom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10281417"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If it's just socialization aspect of daycare, maybe there is another solution -- a play group or music/other activity class? Have you checked to see if there is anything in your area? If not, a local park or other place where moms congregate?<br><br>
Otherwise, as others have suggested, I'd check out the facility first to see if you liked it and then see how your daughter does.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
i agree, maybe story time at the library, or a craft time for toddlers at your local library. is there a park district there that has toddler activity groups?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>aja-belly</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10281600"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">it was very sad. i was the infant room teacher, and loved spending time with him, but he was obviously distressed about being stuck in there with us while the other kids played outside or whatever. it was a crappy situation.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Just wondering, did the state ever do the licensing visits? I would wonder what an inspector would think of seeing that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kodama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10284295"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Just wondering, did the state ever do the licensing visits? I would wonder what an inspector would think of seeing that.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
i have no idea. i was never there when there was an inspection/visit. i worked there as a teenager. the 6 year old was a relative of the owner/director. the center was definately not equiped to handle his needs (i ended up doing his feedings and asthma treatments several times a day without even so much as spoken directions).<br><br>
it closed shortly after i left, and last i went by the church associated with it was gone as well (the whole building was gone).
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top