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Very much a novice at this allergy stuff.

I have 2 year-old twins and both have shown sensitivies to foods. I had MSA testing done when they were just over a year and showed sensitivities to gluten/wheat and cow milk products for my son and gluten/wheat for my daughter.

Now, my daughter has been struggling with some other type of food allergy. She doen't have any wheat/gluten but has been continuing to have serious rashes across her belly, legs, and face. This has been going on for a few months and I cannot seem to figure it out. I KNOW when she has even the tiniest bite of wheat, her body just immediately breaks out.

We have seen a doctor of environmental medicine and a mainstream doctor of allergies. Both individuals were ok in my opinion, not great.

My husband and I did decide to try the scratch test for the both of them. They both had a completely negative panel across the board! I thought the wheat/gluten would come up positive given that my daughter's reactions are so severe, but NO. I know they are testing for a specific IgE molecule. I feel like we took a few steps back here.

We would like to try different forms of testing. What is the ALCAT test and who does it? Any other test recommendations of testing and who admisters these tests?

I'm feeling a little desperate. I've recently reintroduced cow milk to my son to see how he reacts and he's had a slight rash and that's it. He used to have massive breakouts as a result of eating these foods. Although, his behavior has changed from really happy, helpful, and wonderful to absolute meltdowns. Very much against his personality. I'm really confused here. I would love your help on this.
 

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Milk can definitely cause a behavioral reaction (any food can). And kids (at least mine) keep changing symptoms when things are reintroduces (just to further confuse the issue). I am not familiar with MSA testing.

There are gray areas between intolerance and allergy. Eczema can be either. Vomiting can be either. Rashes can be either. And no testing is completely 100% accurate. My DD's worst food is corn, yet she showed negative on intradermal testing (shoot the allergen under the skin) and on the ALCAT test.

ALCAT is a test for IgG (delayed) reactions. www.alcat.com. I had it done for two of my kids. They each had one false negative. It was not covered by insurance (my allopath even wrote a prescription for it to see if that would help, but nope, it was all out of pocket). They give you a rotation diet to follow though, which was very helpful. My two kids had a lot of opposites but at least with the rotation, they had the same foods on the same days. There's also a York test (out of England, NOT out of FL) that is supposed to be good (though even more expensive than ALCAT).
 

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Are you keeping a detailed food journal to see if you can tell from that?
 

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ALCAT and ELISA are the 2 main alternative tests. Well, there's kinesiology and crystal testing, and others as well...

But the most accurate test is simply an elimination diet with a detailed food journal. No tests (conventional OR alternative) are anywhere near 100% accurate for food allergies.

There is a little more info in my blog (link in sig) about the different testing available.
 

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I just got Elisa (IgG) testing done through an ND for myself and I can tell that it probably did not get my trigger. I think I react to chicken, lemon and coconut, and they showed very low on the test. I am actully healing now once I took these out.
The test I did only covered 88 foods, and there is so many other things that we eat like spices, food additives and others. I believe there is a $1000 test that pretty much covers all.
So I went to a environmental medicine doc and he suggested to try Individual Challange Feeding Test. He told me to make a list of things that I eat every day because these are likely to be allergens. Then one buy one eliminate them for 4-5 days and then have some in the morning and observe my reaction to it. He also said that IgG testing is 50/50. They did trials in his clinick on their patients where thay would send blood samples for IgG testig when they knew what their patients react to and they would be only 50% accurate.
I think liminating one by one thing is going to be easy on me if I still notice other triggers.
I was so lucky to find a trigger for my son and it was not an usual suspect: it was tomatoes. I was amazed how quickly his skin healed once I eliminated them from my diet.
 

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So ELISA and ALCAT both test for IgG, but is one supposedly better than the other?

And what about IgA? Is that something they test for?

I am trying to decide whether or not to do an allergy test for my 4 yo. They were useless for my older child when he was younger, but we only did the traditional tests. I did the IgG for myself at the time b/c he was still nursing.

Now, trying to decide if doing an IgG test for my 4 yo is worth it. I have this test from US BioTek, and it is just a finger prick, but even that, I don't want to do something traumatic until I know exactly what would be most helpful.

Any opinions?
 
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