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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a bit lost. Help!<br><br>
I have stainless steel pots. Are they nontoxic/safe to use?<br><br>
I have a stainless steel frying pan, but now that I found out that heating oil in it is ALSO toxic, how am I supposed to use it? What can I saute food in that will make food not stick and not cause cancer?<br><br>
I need to replace my cake and bread pans and cookie sheets. What's best to use? And how do I make stuff not stick?<br><br>
Thanks, mamas--I know this is elementary to you but I have no one else to ask--My mother doesn't cook and knows nothing about this stuff, and all my family and friends IRL think I'm crazy to worry about this stuff, and happily fry things in oil over high heat using their Teflon . . .
 

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I *thought* that stainless steel was non toxic, but not 100% sure... where did you read /hear that frying oil in it is toxic?<br><br>
I'm also somewhat at a loss with bakeware, but I use them so rarely that I'm not planning to replace them anytime soon. What about using glass pyrex products?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply poetesss. Specifically, Dr. Fuhrman (in Eat to Live and Disease-Proof Your Child) says heating oil and sauteeing in oil causes the oil to take on carcingenic properties, but I've read that many other places too. So I try to saute in water, but it's not really effective always, and turns some things to mush.<br><br>
Glass pyrex is a good idea, thanks.
 

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Hi! I'm new here, but I've read that most stainless steel pots/pans are also made w/nickel to make it harder so if you scratch your stainless steel, nickel could leach into the foods that you're cooking in that particular pot/pan. A well seasoned cast iron pan is great to fry things in and I would only use coconut oil for frying as it's the only oil that doesn't change into a bad oil when heated. As far as baking, I know you can use cast iron for baking also but I haven't used it yet for baking. I think ceramic bakeware is supposed to be great for baking too, just make sure it's well greased (again w/coconut oil or butter will work fine too). I'm still in the process of getting rid of my bakeware (still using bakeware that's not good for you) but I will switch once I get the money to replace them all. I hope that helps.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I use ceramic bakeware all the time and everything comes out great. Just butter and flour the pan before baking. I use ramekins for muffins because I have yet to find a ceramic muffin pan. I was thinking about an enamel one.<br><br>
I thought stainless was OK. It's not the pan, but the oil that is the problem. It's really hard to scratch stainless so I don't know that I would worry about the nickel leaching into food.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Stella_luna</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have stainless steel pots. Are they nontoxic/safe to use?</div>
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Yes, they are. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">What can I saute food in that will make food not stick and not cause cancer?</td>
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A well-seasoned cast iron pan is a great, non-sticky thing! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
Searching for "cast iron" amongst the thread titles will yield lots of info.....<br><br>
alsoSarah
 

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<a href="http://www.pcfallon.com/hartstonebakestone.asp" target="_blank">http://www.pcfallon.com/hartstonebakestone.asp</a><br><br>
I had my eyes opened with a "toxic teflon" type thread. I decided to try this stuff and see how it worked. I love it! The first time I made chewy cookies I didn't grease it at all, although the directions tell you to with sticky foods. They still came off ok, minimal sticking. Clean up great in the dishwasher. I really like them!<br><br>
I initially bought an expensive Le Creuset cast iron pan. While I was waiting for it to come in the mail I couldn't stand cooking with teflon still. So I bought a twelve dollar cast iron pan for the interim. The Le Creuset arrived and guess which pan gets the most use? The twelve dollar one. With cast iron, it seems that cheap is just as durable and functional as the expensive ones.
 

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I'm with you, pumpkinsmama!<br><br>
The enamel coating on the Le Creuset means that food is much more likely to stick to it than to plain old well-seasoned cast iron.....<br><br>
alsoSarah
 
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