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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I loved breast-feeding and nursing my son. He never got used to taking a bottle because he didn't like it and I gave up early on, preferring the ease of just putting him on my chest.

I was wanting a bit more flexibility with my second child, plus, I want my 6YO to have the opportunity to feed his sister. My questions are to those who also pumped and used bottles occasionally:

Did you find the use of occasional bottles was possible without disrupting the the BF process (I'm thinking once a week maybe)?

Also, do you think this was a factor in how long your child nursed?

Thanks!

Tracy
Due 2/10/09
 

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I have no idea, but I am sure someone here will have experience with that. I have only ever nursed my 3 boys, and will do the same with this baby. None of my babies wanted anything to do with bottles, although, admittedly I didn't really try. I find that it's more convenient and more flexible just to nurse than to sit and pump milk and store it.
 

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I'll be looking for some good responses here... I'll have to pump for the first couple of months at least, considering I have to go back to school after having this little one. I am concerned about nipple confusion though... I want to nurse the whole first year at least. We're hoping to never have to buy formula, plus I just can't wait for the experience of nursing my baby.
I've thought about running it by my professors to see if I can just bring her to class with me. Has anyone on here ever been in school full time with a newborn? What was your experience like? I have seen other people on campus with their little ones in class... one guy had his newborn daughter there everyday. I figure I could wear her to class and since she'll be so new, she'll probably sleep most of the time...
 

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I had to pump after a while because we had thrush, and giving her bottles with expressed milk didn't seem to affect her desire nor ability to nurse at all, but she took the bottles more readily from someone other than me.

I think the key is waiting until there's a good latch established. I would not introduce a bottle before that and I want to say the typical recommendation is around 12 weeks? I honestly don't remember -- you can ask in the BFing forum, or check out www.kellymom.com.

We only used bottles during the thrush bout (alternating with nursing while I healed) but it didn't affect how long we nursed, because we stopped the bottles once the thrush was completely gone. I don't know that it impacts how long you BF overall honestly.
 

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With my second son I started out pumping plus breastfeeding to build up a little stash of BM (for that flexibility, for dates or for in the car was the idea) but it really threw off my supply-- I make a LOT of milk and quite easily too, so I became painfully engorged. I stopped pumping and that solved that.

Oh, plus I've never been a great pumper-- I have a hard time gettign the milk out with a pump. I've tried three different kinds and some work better than others, though. I think when I pump it stimulates my breasts a lot, which encourages my body to produce more milk, but I'm not actually pumping the milk out at the same level of efficiency, for whatever reason, and that's why the pumping was getting me engorged.

This time though, I still need that flexibility-- same reason-- for dates with my sweetie and for driving in the car-- so I will try again! Hopefully I will find a way to make it work this time!
 

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I'm curious about this too. My first daughter had breastfeeding difficulties so I never wanted to take any chances with bottles and nipple confusion. Then with the second I think I waited too long or gave up too easily, but she would never take a bottle. I took a year off from school with her anyway so it wasn't essential.

I've only known one person to bf/pump and work and I think her supply diminished and she ended up switching to formula after a while.

Quote:
Has anyone on here ever been in school full time with a newborn? What was your experience like? I have seen other people on campus with their little ones in class... one guy had his newborn daughter there everyday. I figure I could wear her to class and since she'll be so new, she'll probably sleep most of the time.
I could have pulled that off with my mellow first baby but no way in heck with my second. She was colicky and had to be literally bounced constantly and cried all the time. I was exhausted and could barely keep up with housework much less homework. Another factor is whether your school is on the quarter or semester system. Maybe a quarter you could pull off, but they grow quickly! I know some of my profs would hav been supportive, others not at all. I guess you could find out how they feel, enroll and give it a shot and withdraw if it is not working out. I myself went to school part time when dd1 was less than a year, I drove home at lunch to nurse her and drove back. It kinda sucked but we got through it. I took a year off with dd2, she was much more "high needs"... a lot depends on the baby's temperament!
 

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I had to use bottles a few times with ds2. We went on a long road trip when he was a few weeks old & even though my mom gave lip service to 'doing what he needs' she wasn't willing to wait for me to nurse him, so I didn't have much choice. It was ok, except for being engorged. I also used bottles whenever I was on transit, since I just didn't feel comfortable nursing on the bus/train & most of the places we need to go take at least an hour each way.

It was fine. He took the bottle, but clearly was less than impressed with it. I weaned him a couple months ago, so it obviously didn't affect the length of our nursing relationship at all.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mal85 View Post
I'll be looking for some good responses here... I'll have to pump for the first couple of months at least, considering I have to go back to school after having this little one. I am concerned about nipple confusion though... I want to nurse the whole first year at least. We're hoping to never have to buy formula, plus I just can't wait for the experience of nursing my baby.
I've thought about running it by my professors to see if I can just bring her to class with me. Has anyone on here ever been in school full time with a newborn? What was your experience like? I have seen other people on campus with their little ones in class... one guy had his newborn daughter there everyday. I figure I could wear her to class and since she'll be so new, she'll probably sleep most of the time...
I think this is an awesome idea- and I would encourage you to pursue it as much as possible! The whole baby-in-workplace and similarily baby-in-educational facility is needed much more in America- and I think unless you had a seriously difficult baby, you could definately make it work. Besides, with nursing and babywearing, it's so easy to keep your baby happy and quiet- if someone else did it as a dad- I'm sure you could! Let us know- I hope you can swing it!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mal85 View Post
I'll be looking for some good responses here... I'll have to pump for the first couple of months at least, considering I have to go back to school after having this little one. I am concerned about nipple confusion though... I want to nurse the whole first year at least. We're hoping to never have to buy formula, plus I just can't wait for the experience of nursing my baby.
I've thought about running it by my professors to see if I can just bring her to class with me. Has anyone on here ever been in school full time with a newborn? What was your experience like? I have seen other people on campus with their little ones in class... one guy had his newborn daughter there everyday. I figure I could wear her to class and since she'll be so new, she'll probably sleep most of the time...
Mal, my sister did this with her first baby. She had no problems. Once he got a bit older a friend at school watched him during her classes so they still spent most of the day together on campus. Hope it works for you!
 

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I think the use of bottles and success of long-term nursing depends a lot on the child and possibly milk supply. I had to pump and also supplement with formula due to work obligations and not being able to yield enough milk with pumping. I worked part-time and pumped through month 13. I continued to breastfeed until my son was 2 1/2. He didn't care at all about getting a bottle when I was gone and was a nursing champion when I was home. I have a friend who had large milk supply with both her kids so (my theory is) that her kids never really had to work hard at nursing (they also got bottles when she was at work) so when they hit 9 months they became very distracted with nursing and began nursing a lot less. Her first self-weaned about 12 months.

The other question about bring baby to class...again..I think it depends on the baby. I had visions of bringing my son to work with me and then I was "blessed" with an infant who HATED the carseat and screamed on all car rides until 7 months old. My workplace is 30 minutes away....so I quickly changed my plans. My son also nursed all the time, so it would have been pretty hard for me to get any work done. Hope it works for you, though. I know the Montessori teachers around here bring their babies to work.
 

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My sons have nursed and had pumped milk through bottles. It was necessary for us because I work and DH is the SAHD. I pumped from the first week--always after the baby was done nursing. I built up as much freezer supply as possible because I knew when I returned to work I wouldn't be able to pump as much as the baby would consume while I was gone. We introduced a bottle at about 6 weeks with both of my sons. Only DH (or rarely someone else) would use the bottles--never me. (Why would I, anyway?)

Neither of my sons had trouble switching back and forth between nursing and bottles. (I'm at the office three days a week, FYI. And DH would bring the baby to nurse at lunch.)

DS1 nursed until 3 1/2 years old. DS2 is 2 1/2 and still nursing.

We'll of course be doing the same thing with DD when she is born soon!

By the way, this taking a bottle thing, really helped a lot at one year old when I stop night nursing and DH takes over feeding with a bottle at night. (I have very low energy always--and this helps me maintain my health. Baby always comes first, but at a year my compromise is to get my health back up to as good as I can. Of course if the baby is sick or teething or something, I will still nurse.) Baby co-sleeps so he takes the baby out of the room when they wake and want to eat. Most of the time after 1 yr they really just want to nurse back to sleep--not eat. They substitute DH holding them for me nursing them. The bottle at night usually isn't asked for longer than a few weeks.
 

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All my children have had sporatic bottles of pumped milk once they consistently had a good latch. They weaned at 3 years, 18 months, and 32 months, respectively.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jr'smom View Post
My sons have nursed and had pumped milk through bottles. It was necessary for us because I work and DH is the SAHD. I pumped from the first week--always after the baby was done nursing. I built up as much freezer supply as possible because I knew when I returned to work I wouldn't be able to pump as much as the baby would consume while I was gone. We introduced a bottle at about 6 weeks with both of my sons. Only DH (or rarely someone else) would use the bottles--never me. (Why would I, anyway?)
This is/was us almost exactly! Only I didn't start pumping until about 4 wks, and didn't have as much as a stash as I would have liked. So this time, I'm hoping to start pumping after the 1st wk. No problems with either boy refusing breast or bottle, I'm hoping this little guy is the same.
 

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My first wanted to nurse 24/7 and we did start bottles earlier than planned. It was no problem for him and helped me get a 3 hour block of sleep. In the early days, I wasn't even getting 3 hours of sleep total a night and I was trying to recover from a c-section! So, bottle use became a necessity as my health started to suffer. I switched from the occassional bottle to the occassional sippy at 3 months easily. My son weaned a month shy of 5 YEARS!

I didn't try bottles with my second until 4 weeks - with the idea that I'd do it once a week since we were driving down to Disney when she was 2 months old. She refused all bottles. (I can't nurse in a car so it was a looooooooong drive there and back!) I started the sippy cup with her at 3 months and it was no problem. The Avent soft spout sippies had said 3+ months when my son started them. They're the exact same ones but the packaging now says 6+ months. My daughter is still nursing and she'll be 3 in March.

For this baby, I'll likely not use bottles at all. We don't have any long car rides planned for the first three months. I'll have a couple on hand since the avent ones can switch from bottle to sippy tops quite easily. I will introduce the sippy at 3 months.

*Unless bottles are introduced too early, I don't think they would disrupt nursing. (And there are several cases of them being used early with no problems). I think a greater issue with early weaning is too many solids too soon.
 

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I've always had a low supply so the kids have gotten bottles very early on and have gone well between them. We never had the bottle fight (well, Evan wasn't keen on DH giving him a bottle, lol, I think he thought it was weird a man was feeding him) and I think it's b/c we started it so soon. We had bfing problems last time w/ Ilana b/c of her suck and it was reccomended to use the Playtex Ventaire standard bottles b/c baby has to suck on those to get milk out. Most bottles will drip into baby's mouth even if not sucking and this can make baby prefer the bottle. The BreastFlow bottles are the same way, both come BPA free if that makes a difference to you.

I'm pumping basically as soon as baby is out, maybe before. I've had problems in the past so I'm supposed to try and trick my body into thinking I had twins, this is probably overkill for moms w/ normal milk supply, especially if done before the milk comes in. I will be leaving baby about 2x a month for about 5-6 hrs at a time for school (most of my classes are online right now) and carseat checks. Come June though, I'll probably be on campus all day w/ baby at daycare, so baby will be 4 mos and then I'll be in school full time for the next 2 yrs so I understand your fears.
 

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I nursed, pumped, bottle fed for the entire time that my daughter nursed - 16 months or so. After about 4 weeks, she bottle fed and nursed daily; it gave me some great flexibility and involved my husband in the feedings more than if I had nursed all the time.

I see you mentioned in your post that you maybe want to bottle feed once a week? I can see that possibly of that being issue only because I am not sure that once a week is really enough to establish a familiarity/comfort with a bottle at such a young age. So, you might want to consider making it a little more frequent.

I always pumped after I nursed or while my husband was bottle feeding to keep my supply up.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
At my lac. consultant's suggestion, I pumped a little off the top before nursing my son. If I didn't it came out so fast, he choked on it! As a result, I had WAY more than I needed. I guess I figured if it happened again, I would pump and donate.

Should I expect more/less or different supply with each child???

Tracy
due 2/10/09
 
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