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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,<br><br>
Just wanted to share my experience on my tour of SLR yesterday. I thought it was very good. The tour was surprisingly VERY crowded. It was my first tour, so I have no basis for comparison, but some of the other participants said other tours were no where near as crowded. We had approximately 50-60 people!<br><br>
Tour lasted about 1 1/2 hours. When you take the tour, you tour both the tradition labor and delivery, and the BC if you choose.<br><br>
Feel free to ask me questions - these are just my takeaways, but we covered so much more...(also, as an aside, my midwife is Sandy Woods).<br><br><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">My thoughts on traditional labor and delivery:</span></b><br>
- all labor and delivery rooms are private (shocking to me that this is not the case in every hospital, but I'll try to limit my person comments from here on out)<br>
- any questions about privacy pertain to the post-partum rooms only. Insurance covers the semi-private rooms (guests must leave at 11pm). Private PP rooms are out-of-pocket cost at $750 <i>per night</i>!<br>
- for every new mom and baby (priv or semi) - you have a choice as to what they do with your baby overnight - can remain with you, can go to the nursery for the entire night, or can go to the nursery and come back to you for the 2am feeding<br>
- all priv rooms have a small twin bed (maybe even a cot?) for SO to sleep.<br>
- all "tests and procedures" done to the baby after birth are done <i>in the room</i> with you - unless there is some major complication, in which case, they NICU is right there, and Dad or other guest would accompany the baby as much as possible.<br>
- nice to know there is no mandatory separation between you and your healthy baby.<br>
- if delivering in traditional L&D, you HAVE to check in at triage on the 12th floor. It is a requirement that they "hold you there" for 30 minutes before admitting you - here they monitor your vital signs. You must the 3cm dilated to be admitted<br>
- IVs are not required and fetal monitoring can be limited to intermittent doppler<br>
- as long as it is written in yoru file by your doc or midwife, you can be as free as a bird. However, if it is not documented, be forewarned that the nurses will do everything in their power to take the most conservative (ie interventionist) apporach possible...so get it in writing!<br>
- there is a jacuzzi tub in the L&D rooms - albeit a very small one<br>
- also, they enourage use of birthing balls and squatting bars - available to all expecting mothers.<br>
- There are 40 L&D rooms, and an avg of 14 births per day. They have never had an issue with overflow at SLR.<br>
- If you want to CD, you must start at home. You cannot bring them in for the nurses to start - although, if the baby never leaves your side, I don't think this will be a problem.<br><br><b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">My thoughts on the Birthing Center:</span></b><br>
- The rooms are very spacious, and there is a full or queen size bed. Everything happens in this one room, labor, delivery and post partum. They basically expect SO to sleep with you (if you choose) in that bed. Seemed like enough room for most.<br>
- Odds of getting into the BC (if your provider has rights) seem high. About 10-15% of the birthing population at SLR use the BC. They gave figures saying on average there was only 1 birth a day there...but don't use that as gospel, as it is an average.<br>
- There are 3 rooms, and 1 overflow room, plus a shared lounge, pantry, kitchnette area for families.<br>
- Transfer rate out of the BC up to L&D is about 1 in 3. Main reason for transfer is lack of progress and the need for pitocin. I asked at what point they considered there be a need for pitocin. She said it was case by case, but usually aroudn 20 hours. Second reason was the request for an epidural.<br>
- There are NO epidurals in the BC - but there are other medications.<br>
- They have birthing balls, but no squatting bars, as you can be on all fours to deliver<br>
- There are limited providers with rights to the BC not because SLR is picky, but because if you are giving birth in the BC, SLR mandates that your care provider remain with you in the BC. They cannot leave. So, a lot of doctors in particular feel they have more patients than not on L&D, so need to be able to move freely, or go to their office, etc.<br>
- There is a risk out sheet - 3 points and you are out - but you must get this from your care provider.<br><br>
I think that's it (at least off the top of my head...I left my "notes" at home). But ask away, and I am sure it will come to me.
 

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Wow, sounds like you got a lot of information. I have a few additional points--the sort of stuff that matters to me (and some of why I homebirth) but it may weigh less in your decision-making than in mine.<br><br>
Did you find out the c-section rate? I thought I looked it up once and it was high. Also are you ok with eye goop and vitamin k injections? They are mandatory at hospitals (not at home). Also are you ok with use of ultrasound? I think they do a mandatory 20 minute EFM strip before you get admitted to the birth center and use dopplers, which use strong ultrasound waves (as opposed to no EFM and no dopplers, but fetascope instead).<br><br>
Also (a big issue for me because of the distraction factor, because of germs being introduced and because of possibility of accidental membrane rupture) are the ok with no vaginal exams at all during pregnancy and labor? This varies midwife to midwife in general I find, but the more hands-off midwives tend to be comfortable with no VEs, as they can judge progress from outward signs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All good points. This isn't likely to convince someone that is dead set on HBing to go to a traditionaly hospital or BC for delivery. But for those wanting the option to deliver in this sort of setting with the least amount of intervention.<br><br>
They said C-section rate is just under 20% - noting that there is nothing distinguishing between those that are elective.<br><br>
I think a lot of people get admittance into L&D confused with the BC. Completely different. The strip and dopplers are all in triage prior to admittance to traditional L&D, not BC.<br><br>
It seems to me that SLR offers one of the more liberal policies when it comes to L&D. But this is something that you have to work out with your provider in advance. It's not likely you can just show up without having your choices in your file and expect free reign. Unfortunate, but true.<br><br>
If you work with your midwife/dr and agree on your course of action, this is not going to change b/c you are at SLR vs what I have heard about other hospitals.
 

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This is great! I wish I'd had this before going into the tour, just to orient me.<br><br>
Quick comments on two of these, though:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Southern_Belle</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10812483"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">- for every new mom and baby (priv or semi) - you have a choice as to what they do with your baby overnight - can remain with you, can go to the nursery for the entire night, or can go to the nursery and come back to you for the 2am feeding</div>
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For anyone interested in SLR/birthing center, double check what happens if a) you end up with a c-section, and b) you don't have a private room. What they told us (~3 years ago, which is why you should ask!) is that the pain meds are considered to be incompatible with being responsible for your baby overnight, and that since you're not in a private room (ie, your partner isn't there to take care of the baby), the baby HAS to go to the nursery. Again, double check.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Southern_Belle</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10812483"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">- nice to know there is no mandatory separation between you and your healthy baby.</div>
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In theory, this is true. In practice, the transfer from an L&D room to a private or shared room can cause a mandatory separation, sometimes for hours. (At the time, the rule was that women in the recovery room who'd had vaginal deliveries couldn't bring their babies in, while women who'd had c-sections could. Gotta love hospital logic.) I was separated from ds for a big chunk of time (couple hours?) because I had to go get parked in a "recovery" room while they got my room ready. Dh went with ds to the nursery, and what we were promised up and down would be 15 minutes... wasn't. This has happened to multiple people I know who birthed at L&D, one who was separated for something like 8 hours.<br><br>
At any rate, I'd ask them for sure under what circumstances you wouldn't be able to have your baby in your arms or traveling next to you in one of those wheeled bassinets, and what happens if there isn't a room ready for you.
 

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silly question... I just moved to the area recently-- what does SLR stand for?? where is it?? ty
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think I'm still "green" in this whole process. Is it bad that I believe that my midwife and I, in the birthing center, can stick to our plans? And knowing that there is no transfer between here and there, my baby will be with me until it's time to leave (barring medical necessity)?<br><br>
SLR is St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital. Located on 10th Avenue, between 58th and 59th in Manhattan.<br><br>
I guess on the one hand, I'm "green" and naive, on the other, I don't believe whole-heartedly what some nurse says b/c it's the party line.<br><br>
I just truly believe that your CNM or Dr will trump any nurse in the BC. And since they MUST be with you, I just don't see how this will be so bad, again, barring complications - REAL complications - not just "you haven't progressed in 2 hours, now we are forcing pitocin on you".
 

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<br><br><br>
For anyone interested in SLR/birthing center, double check what happens if a) you end up with a c-section, and b) you don't have a private room. What they told us (~3 years ago, which is why you should ask!) is that the pain meds are considered to be incompatible with being responsible for your baby overnight, and that since you're not in a private room (ie, your partner isn't there to take care of the baby), the baby HAS to go to the nursery. Again, double check.
<br><br>
I had a c/s there last January, and my DS stayed w/me in my room the entire time. I was in a private room, but no one was staying w/me overnight. No one ever suggested my baby would have to stay in the nursery, and I wouldn't have consented to it...
 

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Southern belle,<br><br><br>
Roosevelt hospital is good place to have a baby but the biggest issue all of us in the birth community have with Roosevelt is that they have no written protocol or polices to support breastfeeding on the regular postpartum floor.<br><br>
It is shitty situation if you happen to have a minor breastfeeding problem and need help.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>dewi</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10815581"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Southern belle,<br><br><br>
Roosevelt hospital is good place to have a baby but the biggest issue all of us in the birth community have with Roosevelt is that they have no written protocol or polices to support breastfeeding on the regular postpartum floor.<br><br>
It is shitty situation if you happen to have a minor breastfeeding problem and need help.</div>
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I agree. Having BTDT, you are pretty much on your own with breastfeeding. The nurses are totally useless, each one tells you something different and ther are no LC's (at least there weren't at the time).<br><br>
As far as the OVERALL hospital experience, it was pretty decent I guess for a hosspital but the majority of nurses were idiots.<br><br>
I delivered my dd there in 2006 via c/section and she roomed in with me.
 

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I've had 2 SLR-Birthing Center births. One was almost 4 years ago and the other a little over a year ago. The first time was with an OB and the second was with a midwife. I had the same great doula both times. Both births were without IV and without meds.<br><br>
The provider really makes all the difference there. My midwife birth was so much better for many reasons. The nurses pretty much do what your provider asks them to do. The BC nurses are better with bf support than regular L&D ones. Also, they do do the eye ointment and the vitamin K shot, but only when you are ready for them to do it. I had delayed cord clamping with second birth because that is how my midwife does it. Babies were with me the whole time after both births.<br><br>
Be sure to ask your provider ahead of time what his/her standard protocol for things that really matter to you. Don't assume anything. I didn't know enough before my first birth and thought because OB was willing to deliver in BC meant that she would not do things like AROM, pushing on back only, count to ten pushing, and immediate cord cutting. I just didn't ask and was surprised/overwhelmed by these things when I arrived after being in posterior labor at home for over 2 days.<br><br>
Anyway, I wholeheartedly recommend the SLRBC with the right provider.
 

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the only thing i would correct is that in practice, in violation of their policy, they do in fact remove babes from mamas who have c-sections, according to my mw. didn't happen to me (i birthed vaginally). but fyi. they do let partners stay with baby at all times.
 
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