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This sounds interesting, I might try to catch one of the screenings. Scan down a bit and click on "The Business of Being Born" to read the full description.<br><br><a href="http://www.tribecafilmfestival.org/tixSYS/2007/filmguide/title-detail.php?PageNumber=2&AlphaRange=BB&Category=ALL&FilterVenue=ALL&Day=&Month=&Year=&Genre=ALL&FestProgram=&ShowShorts=&ShowPast=N" target="_blank">http://www.tribecafilmfestival.org/t...ts=&ShowPast=N</a><br><br>
If that big link doesn't work, try <a href="http://www.tribecafilmfestival.org" target="_blank">www.tribecafilmfestival.org</a> and searching for the title.
 

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The only day you can buy tickets online now is the day I have a guest arriving - typical! Looks like a really good film. I hope it will be available on DVD or the iternet after the festival, anyone think it will be?
 

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Stelly, I was reading on the site and for the days it says "door sales" you can arrive an hour early and queue up for any remaining tix.<br><br>
I guess we'll have to wait and see if it gets distributed after the festival, hope so, looks like it has a good message.
 

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I got my tickets!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cornpicker</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7925874"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Stelly, I was reading on the site and for the days it says "door sales" you can arrive an hour early and queue up for any remaining tix.</div>
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Yes, I saw that but I don't fancy the idea of waiting around for an extra hour in crowds whilst paying $100 a minute to park my car [jaded suburb dweller]<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I'll just hope it comes out on DVD soon.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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The film is getting a little local coverage:<br><br><a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/health/2007/04/26/2007-04-26_oh_baby-2.html" target="_blank">http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle...oh_baby-2.html</a><br><br>
I'm hoping to see it tonight.
 

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I'd love to hear thoughts from others who saw the film, too!<br><br><b>The Business of Being Born</b><br><a href="http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/" target="_blank">http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/</a><br><br>
I was able to see this movie last night at the Tribeca Film Festival. It was fantastic. You can read the synopsis on the website, but basically the film features women who choose homebirth with a midwife, contrasting this with what happens in a hospital birth, the stats of US births v. other developed countries, some history about birth in the US like “twilight sleep” and cyotec and cesarean rates, lots of interviews with mainstream OB/GYNs, labor and delivery staff, midwives, birth activists and educators, and women about birth. Michel Odent is featured, and a few short snips of an interview with Ina May Gaskin. We follow NYC homebirth midwife Cara Muhlhahn as she tends to her patients in prenatal care and at the birth itself. One humorous segment has Cara talking about her own homebirth spliced in with footage of her homebirth. She admits she wasn’t an ideal patient and could write the book on “homebirth midwife begs for c-section!” Less than 90 minutes long, the film was tightly edited and kept me enthralled the whole time.<br><br>
The facts and expert opinions are mixed in with the experiences and birth footage of women featured in the film. I think 4 or 5 homebirths or birth center births were shown, all so beautiful and natural and moving in their simplicity. I cried through each one, and the audience literally gasped with joy as each baby was safely and gently delivered and given right to mom. It was a stark contrast to the footage of hospital births.<br><br>
As one moviegoer said in the Q&A after, “thank you for making a film that celebrates life.”<br><br>
Parts that stood out for me:<br>
The filmmaker interviews 3 OB/GYN med student residents and asks them how often they get to see a natural birth. They stare at her blankly before admitting “not very often.”<br>
All of the births: home, birth center, and hospital.<br>
A range of opinions from the OBs, those who don’t know anything about homebirth and think it is crazy, to those who fully support it<br>
How women were treated in the hospital v. at home<br><br>
The message is very straightforward. It wasn’t preachy and condescending. They use a lot of humor, intelligence, facts, and human-ness to illustrate their message that “hey! Women deserve options in birth and to learn what those options are.” Most of the audience seemed already open to or educated on the topic. Even the family physician and OB who spoke up at the Q&A were not newbies to the concept of homebirth. The former said that he found the film very balanced and was now interested in learning how to offer homebirth as an option to his patients, and the latter is an OB who had her babies at home and said this movie captured the message that she was always trying to give her colleagues. I’d be interested to hear what a skeptic would think of the movie.<br><br>
Ricki Lake was the executive producer and is featured in the film, too, talking about her own journey to homebirth and showing the experience itself. My opinion of her as a Jerry Springer-ish talk show host has definitely changed! She comes across as smart and strong and I’m so happy that she is using her wealth and celebrity to get this important message out. She mentioned that one journalist had written an article slamming her as an opportunist for making this tasteless film, and he wrote a long retraction after seeing it and finding it very worthwhile. I’d love to read both if anyone finds them.<br><br>
On a more personal note, I was deeply moved by this film. Having been grouchy and depressed for days, my mood turned to elation watching this film and I still am high from it. I wish every woman thinking about having a baby could see it. But I know it would not impact many of them, since so many of us in the US are conditioned to see birth as a nightmare to just get over and do whatever the OB says and nothing really matters but getting a healthy baby in your arms at the end of the day. To me, my birth experience DOES matter. I want it to be the transformative, powerful, life-altering experience I know it can be. Seeing this made me so excited and proud that we are planning a homebirth, and grateful that I live in a state and have an insurance company that makes it possible. And that my husband supports my choice despite his misgivings. I hope it gets distributed before our baby comes so he can see it.<br><br>
Another funny story—the NY Daily News said this movie “wasn’t for the squeamish.” And when I picked up my tickets at will call, the woman who gave them to me said, “are you sure you want to see this? It is very graphic.” I said, “I can’t wait to see it! I’ve heard such great things about it!” She said, “well, won’t it scare you, you know, with all you’re about to go through?” [indicating my pregnant belly] I was a little tongue tied for a moment, and said, “It won’t scare me, it will prepare me.” And she seemed happy with that. I just think it would be so weird to be thinking, “Ok, my body is about to go through this tremendous experience, so I’ll just be sure to remain as ignorant about it as possible.” But I guess that is true for a lot of people. I didn’t get the “squeamish” or “graphic” comments at all. Considering what you see in movies and TV these days, these births were so simple and beautiful. Maybe I’ve just seen enough birth footage already that this wasn’t shocking to me. We are so cut off in our culture from birth and death. How it all starts and ends. Interesting.<br><br>
Everyone should see this movie! Enjoy! You can sign up for the email list on the website, and I assume they will send an update when they get a distributor.
 

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There's an article about this movie on Salon.com today.<br><a href="http://salon.com/mwt/feature/2007/05/04/ricki_lake/" target="_blank">Ricki Lake's Awesome Vagina</a>
 

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Cornpicker,<br><br><span style="font-family:Arial;">Thank you for the lovely in-depth review.</span><br><br><span style="font-family:Arial;">I am going tonight with my 20-year-old daughter to see the movie and then to the cocktail party afterward as a fundraiser for the new Birth Center being built in NYC.</span><br><br><span style="font-family:Arial;">I was interviewed on two occasions for this documentary and will see if I made the cut :) I too have heard only wonderful things about the movie. It is all very exciting. I hope that this is one more vehicle to etch away at the 40% c-section and 98% epidural rate in NYC</span><br><br><span style="font-family:Arial;">Ricki has been part of the NYC birth community for many years. She is a labor doula; she originally started on the path wanting to be a midwife (the dichotomy of her public and private life is wild), all this studying and attending the birth conferences and workshops while she was making a living with that horrendous television show. She is the first to say that it was just her day job and at the same time, she really wanted to have her real self to start matching what she was interested in as her life work. She realized along the midwifery path that using her voice and celebrity influence as a birth advocate by making this documentary was more of her calling then being in Midwifery school, though she does go to births as a doula.</span><br><br>
Again Thanks for your insight,<br>
dewi<br>
 

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<b>cornpicker</b> Thank you for that wonderful review of the movie! I really wanted to be able to see this while it was playing but I think I've missed my chance. I'm crossing my fingers that it will get distributed so I can still see it.<br><br><b>dewi</b> I had no idea our rates were so terrible in the city! It's really interesting to hear about the real RL. I get similar responses from folks when they learn of my birth junkie tendancies (my personality/life choices/day job make it a bit of a shock to them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">).
 

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Wow! Thanks for the review CP.<br><br>
I called about tickets but they were sold out. A friend of mine is going to tonights screening.<br><br>
I can hardly wait to see it.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cornpicker</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8033961"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'd love to hear thoughts from others who saw the film, too!<br><br><b>The Business of Being Born</b><br><a href="http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/" target="_blank">http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/</a><br><br>
I was able to see this movie last night at the Tribeca Film Festival. It was fantastic. You can read the synopsis on the website, but basically the film features women who choose homebirth with a midwife, contrasting this with what happens in a hospital birth, the stats of US births v. other developed countries, some history about birth in the US like “twilight sleep” and cyotec and cesarean rates, lots of interviews with mainstream OB/GYNs, labor and delivery staff, midwives, birth activists and educators, and women about birth. Michel Odent is featured, and a few short snips of an interview with Ina May Gaskin. We follow NYC homebirth midwife Cara Muhlhahn as she tends to her patients in prenatal care and at the birth itself. One humorous segment has Cara talking about her own homebirth spliced in with footage of her homebirth. She admits she wasn’t an ideal patient and could write the book on “homebirth midwife begs for c-section!” Less than 90 minutes long, the film was tightly edited and kept me enthralled the whole time.<br><br>
The facts and expert opinions are mixed in with the experiences and birth footage of women featured in the film. I think 4 or 5 homebirths or birth center births were shown, all so beautiful and natural and moving in their simplicity. I cried through each one, and the audience literally gasped with joy as each baby was safely and gently delivered and given right to mom. It was a stark contrast to the footage of hospital births.<br><br>
As one moviegoer said in the Q&A after, “thank you for making a film that celebrates life.”<br><br>
Parts that stood out for me:<br>
?The filmmaker interviews 3 OB/GYN med student residents and asks them how often they get to see a natural birth. They stare at her blankly before admitting “not very often.”<br>
?All of the births: home, birth center, and hospital.<br>
?A range of opinions from the OBs, those who don’t know anything about homebirth and think it is crazy, to those who fully support it<br>
?How women were treated in the hospital v. at home<br><br>
The message is very straightforward. It wasn’t preachy and condescending. They use a lot of humor, intelligence, facts, and human-ness to illustrate their message that “hey! Women deserve options in birth and to learn what those options are.” Most of the audience seemed already open to or educated on the topic. Even the family physician and OB who spoke up at the Q&A were not newbies to the concept of homebirth. The former said that he found the film very balanced and was now interested in learning how to offer homebirth as an option to his patients, and the latter is an OB who had her babies at home and said this movie captured the message that she was always trying to give her colleagues. I’d be interested to hear what a skeptic would think of the movie.<br><br>
Ricki Lake was the executive producer and is featured in the film, too, talking about her own journey to homebirth and showing the experience itself. My opinion of her as a Jerry Springer-ish talk show host has definitely changed! She comes across as smart and strong and I’m so happy that she is using her wealth and celebrity to get this important message out. She mentioned that one journalist had written an article slamming her as an opportunist for making this tasteless film, and he wrote a long retraction after seeing it and finding it very worthwhile. I’d love to read both if anyone finds them.<br><br>
On a more personal note, I was deeply moved by this film. Having been grouchy and depressed for days, my mood turned to elation watching this film and I still am high from it. I wish every woman thinking about having a baby could see it. But I know it would not impact many of them, since so many of us in the US are conditioned to see birth as a nightmare to just get over and do whatever the OB says and nothing really matters but getting a healthy baby in your arms at the end of the day. To me, my birth experience DOES matter. I want it to be the transformative, powerful, life-altering experience I know it can be. Seeing this made me so excited and proud that we are planning a homebirth, and grateful that I live in a state and have an insurance company that makes it possible. And that my husband supports my choice despite his misgivings. I hope it gets distributed before our baby comes so he can see it.<br><br>
Another funny story—the NY Daily News said this movie “wasn’t for the squeamish.” And when I picked up my tickets at will call, the woman who gave them to me said, “are you sure you want to see this? It is very graphic.” I said, “I can’t wait to see it! I’ve heard such great things about it!” She said, “well, won’t it scare you, you know, with all you’re about to go through?” [indicating my pregnant belly] I was a little tongue tied for a moment, and said, “It won’t scare me, it will prepare me.” And she seemed happy with that. I just think it would be so weird to be thinking, “Ok, my body is about to go through this tremendous experience, so I’ll just be sure to remain as ignorant about it as possible.” But I guess that is true for a lot of people. I didn’t get the “squeamish” or “graphic” comments at all. Considering what you see in movies and TV these days, these births were so simple and beautiful. Maybe I’ve just seen enough birth footage already that this wasn’t shocking to me. We are so cut off in our culture from birth and death. How it all starts and ends. Interesting.<br><br>
Everyone should see this movie! Enjoy! You can sign up for the email list on the website, and I assume they will send an update when they get a distributor.</div>
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Cornpicker,<br><br>
I would like to post your review of the film on our local Jersey City yahoo group. Would that be OK with you? If not, that's fine. I really do like your review and I love to send eye-opening news to our local JerseyCityites....
 

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Sure, I'm all for getting the word out! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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