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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My baby was OP and acynclitic and I ended up with a cesarean after 4 hours of pushing. I think lots about VBAC. How likely is it that my next baby will be the same, sometimes I am afraid to hope for a VBAC incase I end up with another cesarean. You know when you think you want something so badly that it might not happen just to crush you....
 

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My last baby was op and acynclitic as well. Luckily for us he did finally come out, but it took 90 minutes of pushing (and he was my second baby, so they were wondering what was taking him so long and preparing for other birth options). He was 9 pounds, 9 ounces. I am grateful we did not know he was op because that might have swayed the decision as to let me continue or not.<br><br>
I am 36 weeks pregnant now and hoping beyond hope this baby does not come op. I know if he is lined up correctly things should just go quickly. But I wonder if there is something about your body shape that lends itself to baby being positioned that way? I have tried to do all the spinningbabies.com stuff too as far as my positioning goes. I think he is op right now as I feel movement belly button level and I can only picture that being feet (and I feel a hard butt/back at the top of my uterus). I am really waiting until labor starts to help baby move the right way, as currently he sways back from the left to the right. I just hope my water doesn't break first (but it never has before *keeping fingers crossed*!).<br><br>
I am spending a lot of time on the birth ball, and I am praying to be in tune with my baby and my body so I can help as much as possible.<br><br>
It sounds like you are apprehensive about a vbac because there is no garantee things will work out -- I can understand that. It would be a hard decision to make. All you can do is try, and then prepare for anything. I have a dear friend who had a section for a breech baby. The second time around she was going to have a repeat section (they don't officially offer vbacs in my area). She tried going that route for about 4 months. Finally she had too many feelings about just stepping into another section and not trying for a vbac. She went to about 4 different doctors and found no one in our area supportive. She found two doctors in the Sacramento area (about 90 minutes away) who were very vbac friendly. She switched to them. She did everything she could, she felt this was the best decision. When labor started, all she could do was hope for the best. After 36 hours they opted for a repeat cesarean, but at least she knew she tried everything. She has the knowledge this baby really needed to come that way, and she didn't just offer herself up for the sake of hospital policy.<br><br>
(((hugs))). It is a hard decision to make. Good luck to you while you are thinking about all of this -- and I pray for a healthy, non op baby!
 

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a GREAT resource for pre-labor baby positioning is <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Sit Up and Take Notice</span>. It's available through the midwifery today bookstore. I could probably write a book of my own on this subject, but instead I'll just say that I would definitely encourage a client in your situation to attempt a VBAC, and I'd be very suprised if she had a repeat c-sec for the same reason.
 

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My experience has been that a lot of these babies remain posterior b/c of directed pushing at 10 cms. Often with a baby that is OP, they remain higher in the pelvis and don't 'come down' until they rotate. But if you are instructed to push, you push the baby down OP and often they don't rotate until on the perinium, if at all.<br><br>
Try hands and knees, leaning forward, etc. while in labor and don't push until you have an overwhelming urge. This can be hard to accomplish with traditional caregivers in a hospital (or even at home for some!). Babies move in labor - many, if not most, start labor transverse (OT) and rotate one way or the other. You can prevent rotation to OP with your positioning.
 

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I am not a midwife(hope to be in the future) but do have some insight into your situation. My oldest daughter was suposed to be a homebirth. We knew she was OP and were prepared for that. But when it came time to push she just wouldn't move. After 10 hours of pushing my MW determined that she was OP and acynclitic. We ultimately decided to go to the hospital where she was born using the vacuum and 3 episiotomies. It was very painful, both emotionally and phsically. I was broken and never really wanted to have another baby. I questioned whether I had made the right decision about homebirth but really didn't think the hospital was much better. I unexpectedly got pregnant again when my daughter was 14 months old. I did a lot of healing and soul searching during my pregnancy and ultimately decided to go again with a MW. I was so worried about having another baby that was OP and acynclitic. I read lots of books on fetal positioning,practiced what I had learned, and just really searched myself for what felt right. I ended up having a great birth at a free standing birth center(no homebirth MWs around) and really felt myself healed with this birth. I would recommend doing lots of reading and reflecting. It is not very likely that your next baby would be OP and acynclitic so a VBAC would be an option. Good luck.
 

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Funny you should post that. I was just thinking about the samething <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
My first two babies were posterior until labor. THe first, I didn't know he was until way after his birth. I realizedit in hindsight. When he turned, mylabor progressed very rapidly. My 2nd, I was in prodromal labor for 12 days. I did every position changing thing I could think of. I went into labor and was in hard labor for 8 hours. During one huge, intense contraction, my waterbroke, my son turned and slammed into my perineum...all at once. It was crazy. The baby I am carrying right now is posterior and I hope beyond hope that she or he turns before labor. I really don't want anotherlong labor. The only thing is, I'm 100% certain that if my other two had been positioned correctly, they would have been very very fast labors. So I'm worried that ifthis baby is positioned correctly, it will be justthat: a very very fast labor. I'm okay witht hat, my DH, not so much.<br><br>
It's not always true, but a lot of the time you will find that women just carry babiesa certain way. I make posterior babies. It's just what I do. Maybe you do too. I hope that you have an absolutely fantastic VBAC.<br><br>
Namaste, Tara<br>
mama to Doodle (7), Butterfly (2), and Rythm (due at home 1/06)
 

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My first baby (born at home) was ROP and I pushed for several hours also before she was born.<br><br>
My second baby (born at home) was LOP, asynclictic, with a deflexed head. I pushed for several hours before he was born.<br><br>
My third was LOA and easy ... I went to the chiropractor regularly.<br><br>
My fourth was LOA and easy also.<br><br>
Good Luck!
 

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also Optimal Foetal Positioning by Jean Sutton. You can prevent a lot of posterior postioning, by getting out of recliners and sofas, sitting upright on chairs, birth balls, tailor sitting etc. Most sofas should go in the trash, that is how bad they are about creating a posterior baby...Get on hands and knees(this worked for me both labors) I try to help the clients avoid OP to begin with, but sometimes babes just didn't turn until labor...but they did turn. And most were not hospital births. I think being in the hospital most of the time, makes it worse, since you aren't generally allowed to move much... turning an OP baby takes a lot of movement! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for this info and support. I will check out the resources. I didn't do much sitting down in the pregnancy. My job involves me standing alot and I used a birth ball at home. I was on all fours for the labor, I stayed at home until 8cm's and even at the hospital I wouldn't sit still. I pissed the nurses off as i refused monitoring and couldn't even stay still for the IV, my midwife afterwards said she didn't know I was an acrobat! But still the baby didn't turn! I will try a VBAC next time, it scares me to have another c-section on an emotional rather than physical level.
 

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Wow, you really did all you could, I think! I am glad you pissed the nurses off...hehehehe...Love that independent spirit...How much time did they give you before your water was broken?(if it didn't break at home) generally speaking, once the water is broken the baby stays pretty close to whatever position it was in when that happened, although many do turn. Have a home VBAC, you will probably have the best chance of a normal labor...and birth...
 

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I haven't had an OP baby, but along with everything else said here, I second the suggestion about chiropractic care. My last baby was very big (for me). 10 lbs and yet it was the easiest labor. I had had regular chiropractic care, including many alternative energy therapies, for lack of a better word, to clear anything from babe or myself that would prevent anything but the easiest of labors. Besides facilitating, I believe, a very easy birth though he had "sticky" shoulders (14 1/2 " head, 15 1/2 " chest), it also did wonders for my sense of peace and mental/spiritual preparation. I felt it helped to remove obstacles from his path and mine. Peace to you for a wonderful birth. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/luxlove.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="throb">
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cathi, my water broke at home at about 11.30pm, I was fully dilated at 1.30am and the c-section decision was made at about 6am. I never really had an urge to push but pushed anyway.....maybe that was my downfall. I would love a HBAC but not sure of finding a midwife who could/would do it (I'm not even pregnant yet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> )
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cathicog</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can prevent a lot of posterior postioning, by getting out of recliners and sofas, sitting upright on chairs, birth balls, tailor sitting etc.</div>
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My first two babies were OP despite the fact that I worked out daily at a gym, jogged, bicycled, etc.
 

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I had an OP baby & he was ascyclical also. My water broke on a Wednesday (3pm) and I had him on Friday morning at 11:08 am. I went 20 hours with no contractions, pit for another 23. I did use an epidural around hour 37 (4 cm) & fell asleep immediately. I woke up 3 hours later to a perfect 10 & then I pushed for over 3 hours without medication. I did have a vaginal birth & an awesome midwife (who works with an OB). Most people would have had the c-birth-but they really worked with me.<br><br>
This is my FEAR with my 2nd. I am trying really hard to work through this early enough so that it doesn't take over for our planned homebirth.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ruby slippers</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I never really had an urge to push but pushed anyway.....maybe that was my downfall.</div>
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ABSOLUTELY! If a baby is malpositioned and you push w/o the urge, you simply force them through the pelvis in a less-than-optimal position. Pushing w/o the urge can even CAUSE malpresentation (my first son flipped posterior at full dilation when I started pushing w/o the urge). I second the recommendations for chiropractic care, but also suggest lots and lots of reading on the mechanisms of labor and second stage <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. This usually isn't a body thing, but just a baby thing. There's no reason to think your second birth will be the same.<br><br>
Incidentally, as far as posterior being caused by realxed positions and postures...I used to buy that, but after my experience in the Philippines, I don't. There are just as many posterior babies over there (many are born both posterior and acynclytic, actually!), and they could not possibly live a more different lifestyle than we do. I believe that malposition is over-diagnosed and can probably only be REALLY diagnosed when it causes labor dystocia. But that's just my opinion based on my own experience. I do still encourage my moms to have baby in a "good" position prior to labor, but I'm not one to freak out if it doesn't happen. I've seen too many 2 hour labors with a posterior and/or acyncytic babies to force the issue,
 

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Active Labor by Janet Balaskas talks about optimal labor positions for different presentations as well. I had learned that if Mom spends time each day toward the end of pregnancy in the hands and knees position it encourages a posterior babe to turn, and an anterior babe to stay the way she is, all due to gravity. I have also heard to avoid the semi reclined position both at the end of pregnancy and certainly in labor.<br><br>
My first child was OP, and long before the pushing stage I spent time laboring on my side and she turned quickly (within 3 contractions) and came on down. This was partly b/c my caregiver recognized early in labor that she was OP, when we could still try some solutions that work well BEFORE pushing. Incidentally, my other 2 were anterior and fine. Had my first necessitated a C section, the other could have been VBAC's no problem. My nephew was OP as well but this was not discovered or addressed until hours into the pushing stage. He required a large episiotomy and a vacuum extraction to be born. My sister spent most of her labor hooked up to monitors in a semi reclined position, go figure <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banghead.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banghead">
 

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Something else to think about: Once your water breaks it can be a lot harder for baby to move around in there -- amniotic fluid is very slippery for a reason. Perhaps this time you could look into taking a supplement like vitamin E to help keep your bag intact longer? I know that's what I DON'T want to happen -- my labor to begin with the bag breaking! I want more time to try and manuever!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ldsapmom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Something else to think about: Once your water breaks it can be a lot harder for baby to move around in there -- amniotic fluid is very slippery for a reason. Perhaps this time you could look into taking a supplement like vitamin E to help keep your bag intact longer? I know that's what I DON'T want to happen -- my labor to begin with the bag breaking! I want more time to try and manuever!</div>
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My youngest dd was born in the caul and OP <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> I love op presentations they are good for my body... my most recent baby was LOA and hell <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ruby slippers</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Cathi, my water broke at home at about 11.30pm, I was fully dilated at 1.30am and the c-section decision was made at about 6am. I never really had an urge to push but pushed anyway.....maybe that was my downfall. I would love a HBAC but not sure of finding a midwife who could/would do it (I'm not even pregnant yet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> )</div>
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WOW, fully dilated after 2 hrs??? That is FAST! Yeah, pushing when you didn't feel like it (I hate managed labors, generally) could have caused the problem. But keep looking for someone who will do VBACs at home, I know several mw who do, because it is the only way many women will ever have any chance of a normal labor...) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> One friend of mine just had her 6th UC, after having her 5th with me, her homebirth was the first unmedicated birth she had ever been allowed to have...the others were 2 sections and 2 epidurals... so there is hope... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> A CPM or direct entry would be most likely to do HBAC, but you may find a Cnm in a friendly state, who also can...
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Marsupialmuma</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My youngest dd was born in the caul and OP <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> I love op presentations they are good for my body... my most recent baby was LOA and hell <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:</div>
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Yes important to remember that not ALL bodies are built for the same presentation. I have a good friend who also birthed all 3 of her OP kids without the difficulties sometimes associated with it...
 
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