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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't feel like there is anything wrong with my son. I am not worried about his development but than I worry about not worrying (I think this is something only a mother can comprehend
)
anyway DS turned 2 June 3oth and can only say:
Mommy
Daddy
Nanny
completely understandable by to others...he also has many other words that *I* and my DD and sometimes DH know he is trying to say but no one else would know what he is saying.
His receptive language is perfect. He understands everything...I have conversations with him b/c he can also sign.
so would early intervention actually teach him to speak in some magic way. I don't need my mind put at ease b/c I really just think he's late talker...but then again what if I'm holding back his development by not getting him a little help.
I do speak clearly to him and help him try and say words.
so what is your EI experience?
 

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I think that there is a very broad range of what's "appropriate" for speech at this age. I also think it's a great sign that he clearly understands what you are saying and will often say things, even if only you can comprehend them.

However, my personal feeling is that it doesn't hurt to mention it at a doctor's appointment (if you do well child visits) just to get some additional feedback.

Good luck with whatever you decide!
 

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Our ds sounds very similar to yours. He also had (and still has) many words that only I understand, with a few words that are easy to get (like uh-oh and bye-bye), and he is fine on receptive language. We met with Early Intervention when he was 26 months old. I think it can be worth doing the evaluation to get a more objective look at his language skills, although it seems that it's hard to get a good speech therapist. The one we have is too pushy, and ds decided after 4 or 5 sessions (once a week) to stop cooperating with her. He will play with her toys, but he won't talk to her. If you do decide to do it, try to get a therapist who works well with your child.
 

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I think that it could be nothing and could be something. My DS was a very late talker, he had his advocate, DD, speak for him in our case. I second mentioning it to the Ped, that is if you like your ped. I did, and we discussed it and now DS is 3 1/2 and doesn't stop talking. There are many reasons for a late talker. Trust your instincts.
 

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Us specialists get excited when kids don't do things the way we think they should - sometimes it's just a matter of a child focusing on other skills and nothing to worry about


"If your toddler isn't as talkative as his peers, you probably have no cause for concern. A 12-year child-development study reveals that as long as toddlers understand some words (even if they don't use them), they're doing fine.

The study, conducted by J. Steven Reznick, Ph.D., professor of psychology and child study at Yale University, focused on more than 400 pairs of same-sex twins. Research showed that language comprehension at ages 14 months and 20 months was a better indicator of how well the twins would do on later intelligence tests than was the ability to speak. "Many children who don't say much are understanding well, but may be less talkative due to temperament," Dr. Reznick says.

For the record, the average 14-month-old girl and boy use about 12 and 8 words respectively; by 20 months their vocabulary leaps to 180 and 120 words respectively. "

It can't hurt to meet with a specialist - whoever spends the most amount of time with him should make sure they follow any recommendations. (talking to explain what you're doing when your cooking, doing laundry etc...encouraging speech but not in a way that causes stress, looking at mouth form words) In some cases a specialist will say not to give a child something until they ask for it - accepting any approximation of the word or a sign. Signing Time videos watched WITH your child and carried over into daily routines can be helpful. Sign language helps prep the brain for spoken language development.
 

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After we take ds in for his 2 year check I plan to get him evaluated as he has some words, but not very many. He has been picking up more in the past month which is the reason I've put off getting him an evaluation. If his language explosion happens between now and his birthday then no evaluation. If it doesn't no big deal as I've discussed an evaluation at age 2 with the NP he sees as well as dd's speech teacher at school. As I've already got one child with very significant speech delays that are starting to bother her during her day at school I'm more proactive this time around. With dd I listened to too many doctors and nurses and ignored my mommy instinct that said something wasn't right. I'm not really worried about ds not wanting to speak as it's obvious he just has no need to speak. He will laugh at us if we try to get him to ask for something he wants as we both know he can say the word, but he won't say it. I also know from my experience with speech therapy that a little extra help from someone coming here to play with him isn't going to hurt ds and it might entice him to talk more.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hipumpkins View Post
completely understandable by to others...he also has many other words that *I* and my DD and sometimes DH know he is trying to say but no one else would know what he is saying.
His receptive language is perfect. He understands everything...I have conversations with him b/c he can also sign.

so would early intervention actually teach him to speak in some magic way. I don't need my mind put at ease b/c I really just think he's late talker... so what is your EI experience?
Answering the bolded above. Highly unlikely. My oldest was a late talker as well, and we did the whole EI thing from 2 to 2.5. Our EI experience? It was a joke. Laughable, at best. If you feel your ds is fine in the other areas, which it sounds like he is, cause he sounds alot like my ds1 at that age, then go with that, mama.
 

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My daughter gets EI speech therapy. I'm glad I called them because I had this nagging feeling that although she was saying words she wasn't completely where she should be. The evaluation was pretty thorough. We discovered DD has a mild speech delay. Her progress is slow but steady. I've definitely seen an improvement and she's now starting to combine words. My daughter had good receptive speech but poor expressive speech. In my experience, the SLPs are concerned when the delay is in receptive speech versus expressive. It's a very good sign that your child can follow directions, etc.


I don't think EI teaches children to talk in some magic way. I wish!
They use play based teaching to encourage the child to communicate. They also work with the child to get him to make sounds that are used in speech. For example, they may have your child blow a balloon or blow bubbles so that his mouth would get used to making "O" sounds. My experience is that they teach you fun ways to engage with your child to elicit more communication from the child. EI doesn't just help the child. It helps the parent too. And it helps if you have a SLP that clicks with your child. Initially I didn't think I was going to like the person we were assigned but she loves my daughter and she gets along well with me. So much for first impressions! As far as my daughter is concerned, the therapist is a great playmate with a big bag of fun toys.
 

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My son is in EI and has been since he was 11 months. He has gross motor delays as well as language delays. We actually have 2 different people come out to our house. One I really like, the other one is just ok. Its mostly just like they are playing with him and they help us learn ways to encourage him to speak, move, etc. They provide tips, like holding the object near your mouth so the look at you when you say the word. They also encourage sign language. I second the Signing Time! videos, they helped me learn the signs and remember them. Some PBS stations play it, some librarys have them, netflix rents them and then of course you could buy them (I was hoping to find someone who could burn them for me but no such luck as of yet.) The process isn't scary and it certainly couldn't hurt. If you don't like the first person, try another one. Its always good to talk to your pedi (well lets hope you like and trust him/her) about these things. You don't need them to refer you to EI, you can self refer. We also have taken our DS to a developmental pedi, but the results just said he is delayed. NO DUH!

HTH
 

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I work in early intervention doing assessments for children 0-5. I have an initial screening tool that is used by the clinics in my area, and collected, scored, and reviewed by me. While I'm not in your area to do a follow-up home visit if it looks like your son may benefit from EI services, I could send you a packet with the questionnaires so you could answer and score them for yourself (based on what you know of your son's development). It might be a handy tool to take with you to his next Dr.'s. appt. If you're interested, PM me with your address or contact info. I don't have a way yet to e-mail the questionnaires, otherwise I'd have sent you one already.
 

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For us the kicker that made me decide to get DD evaluated by EI was that NO ONE could understand whatever it was she was trying to say and it made her very, very frustrated, resulting in temper tantrums. 2yo's throw enough of those because you tell them they can't have what they want, shouldn't have to be throwing them because they can't communicate at all.
 

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my ds had very few words at his 2 year check up (he's 5 now) and our ped recommended an EI eval which i was very hesitant to do. i kept thinking "he's fine" and "everyone develops at their own pace" etc. and he was and they do But i ended up doing the eval because he was in daycare and all of the other kids his age were talking more and i didn't want him to lag too far behind and become socially isolated/frustrated.

he ended up getting speech therapy 2 times/week for 6 months and then down to once/week until he turned 3. we had a great speech therapist and he loved playing with her and i learned a lot of tricks to help him develop oral motor skils and i was able to help the caregivers at daycare come up with fun activities for the whole class that were based on the speech exercises - blowing cotton balls across the table, making different shapes with your mouth, trying different textured snacks, etc.

so it was a great thing for him/us but i understand how EI success would really depend on the service provider you get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
These posts are wonderfully informative..thank you everyone. Every post here gave me something to consider and think about and also nod my head saying, "yup that's me"
I really appreciate all the replies and picesemama24 I PMd you.
 

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I called today. Just for my peace of mind. My DD is almost 17 months and says a few words, but I just want to be sure. They asked me some questions on the phone and said it would take 2 weeks for an answer. Some of the questions got me to thinking that I need to do different things with her like role playing. That's of she would sit still for it. I feel better that I called, but now I'm off to find out what types of play I may be lacking.
 
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