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I have been unschooling my 4.5 yr old son all along and love the iddea and concept of it. (works best for me with two high intensity children under the age of 5) (plus an infant) BUT I am wondering what about when they get older? How can I continue to unschool while getting them to learn things they need for college klike algebra and such???? Do I have to use curriculum as they get older? Frankly, I do not care if they go to college. I never did and do not put a lot of weight on it but if they want to or have to for a carreer, I want them to be able to.
Also, how do you do it? Gimme some ideas, tips, etc.....
TIA.
Tonia
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ToniaStarr
How can I continue to unschool while getting them to learn things they need for college klike algebra and such????
To me, these two thoughts are mutually exclusive. By unschooling, our kids are directing their learning, so if they wanted to go to college, or for some other reason, wanted to learn algebra, they would do so voluntarily--not because I was "getting them" to do so. Make sense?

Quote:
Do I have to use curriculum as they get older?
As far as I know, there is no curriculum police, so, no, you don't have to use a curriculum.
Your kids may WANT to, for whatever reason though. My ds recently began working through a geometry book--there are other ways to learn geometry, but that was his choice. I know other kids who have picked up writing programs or other courses.

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Frankly, I do not care if they go to college. I never did and do not put a lot of weight on it but if they want to or have to for a carreer, I want them to be able to.
ikwym. My oldest is 14 and we recently had a conversation about this "college readiness" stuff. He told me, "Mom, if I decide to go to college and there's something I need to know that I don't know, I'll just learn it and THEN apply to college." Sounds simple enough...and he's right--any gap he might have could easily be filled when the motivation is there.

The thing to remember is that there's no time limit for going to college. Some people will go at 14 or 16, others at the "typical" age of 18, and others at 25 or 45 or 60 or ??? My belief about unschooling is that kids learn what they need to learn at the time they need to learn it. The option to learn something is always there.
 

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I had the opposite concern when I was beginning to explore the idea of unschooling my kids. I figured their natural interests would carry them through when they got older, but how on earth would they unschool before they could read!?
I realize how silly that is, now, but at the time, it made sense to me.

You may want to check out the book Real Lives: Eleven Teenagers Who Don't Go to School Tell Their Own Stories by Grace Llewellyn. I found it fascinating and inspiring.
 

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{hoping this post is okay here}

I suggest taking the next year or two to read, research and intuit what is *your* educational philosophy for your family, your goals, the personalities in your family.

Read about unschooling. Read about school-at-home. Read about classical education. Read about a literature rich environment. Read about all levels of relaxed unschooling. Read about delayed academics.

And make your choices based on what speaks to your heart for your family. Don't feel tied to adhering to any label or fulfilling any idealology.
 
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