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So I'm kind of in a quandry about bedding for baby . . . what should I get organic, what shouldn't I worry about? Do I get the sheets organic or not worry about it? And do I need a mattress pad and a mattress protector? Help! What are you ladies doing about this? And if you are going organic, where to buy?
 

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If you only get one thing organic (bedding wise), I would recommend getting the mattress organic. Sheets etc. can all be washed multiple times and generally don't have as many chemicals to begin with. Some of the things they use in mattress' are just scary and they out gas for a long time. I just read an interesting article about the correlation between SIDS and the use of chemicals in childrens bedding. I'll see if I can find it again.<br><br>
If you are co-sleeping, are there mattress covers that can take care of that sort of thing? I don't really know. We're co-sleeping and already have an organic mattress. We also have a co-sleeper, I'm not sure if I'll use it or not but arms reach sells organic mattress' and bedding. All of our sheets are OLD and either from my great grandma or a thrift store so I'm not going to bother buying organic bedding, it's just too expensive!<br><br>
I'm not sure if any of that helps, I guess it depends on what your sleeping arrangements are be.
 

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I've learned a lot from a friend who runs a chemical and environmental illnesses support group.<br><br>
Cotton is one of the (if not *the*) most heavily sprayed crops in the U.S. If you are concerned about chemicals and due cotton, do organic cotton (and then unbleached organic cotton.) Once you get that far you need to keep in mind most woven sheets are treated to be wrinkle-resistant. That is with chemicals related to teflon and it sticks to the sheets like teflon always remaining in the fabric to some degree. (That's why OshKosh overalls are so darn durable.) The jersey sheets (think T-shirt fabric) aren't impregnated with the wrinkle-resistant chemicals.<br><br>
If my only option were between organic cotton and conventional wool I'd opt for conventional wool bedding. Cotton absorbs moisture and mildews (unless of course it's treated with heavy duty mildewcide.) Wool is cool in summer, warm in winter, doesn't chill you when wet, keeps urine leaks from breaking down into caustic ammonia, and is naturally mildew-proof. It also wears like steel.<br><br>
Hemp is mildew resistant and even if not certified organic is highly unlikely to have been sprayed. It won't keep urine from breaking down into ammonia but is easier to find in sheets than wool. Unfortunately our country's whacked out drug policy makes it expensive in the U.S.<br><br>
~BV
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bryonyvaughn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8970304"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Cotton is one of the (if not *the*) most heavily sprayed crops in the U.S. If you are concerned about chemicals and due cotton, do organic cotton (and then unbleached organic cotton.)</div>
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there is a cotton field right behind my house. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> everytime they come out to spray, we all come inside. it freaks me out. i love our neighborhood, but thoses fields make me nervous. they start probably 50 feet from my backdoor. :/<br><br>
as for the op, i'll be making all the bedding for the amby with organic cotton & velour.
 
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