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http://www.ocolly.com/read_story.php?a_id=31005

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Among many claims in the case, the underlying issue is discrimination against her pregnancy and motherhood when she brought her child to work to breastfeed, Weinberger said. An expected trial date in the case could be next spring, she said.

One reason for the increase in these kinds of lawsuits is because today's generation of women think they should be able to be mothers and be treated well as employees, said Mary Still, a researcher and post-doctoral fellow at Cornell University.

"The new generation is saying, 'This is not right; this is not fair treatment,'" Still said.
Interesting...
 

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Her suggestion of part-time tenure tracks is fantasy.

That said, I've gotten amazing and consistent support as a Ph.D. student with two children. Not a single one of my teachers has ever suggested anything but full support for me and my pregnant/lactating self.
 

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When I was teaching adjunct at a smaller state school in OK, I brought my baby with me and taught. Granted, in my field it was easier to do since I taught one-on-one with my students, but the dept. was wonderfully accomodating to me during the end of my pregnancy and that next year. At the same time I was doing this, I was also a doctoral student at OU, and I was treated pretty shabbily. They made it impossible for me to continue, since they claimed that as a grad. asst. and "part-time" employee, I didn't qualify for maternity anything. Since my baby was due at the beginining of a semester, I could only take as much time off as I could find a sub to teach my classes, and they wouldn't accomodate the schedule I worked out. I would have only had 2 weeks off, and since I ended up with a cs, there was NO way that would have worked. The dept. there was not exactly friendly to women having babies.
 

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I'm at OSU as a PhD student, and I've also gotten great support.

In my case, though, I have a husband who backs me up. I'm the major breadwinner, and he's a part-time house husband. I couldn't be her fulltime caregiver and also do this- departmental support or no.

I agree that half-time tenure track ain't gonna happen.

Julia
 

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Actually, I posted the link to the article to the LLL group in Norman, OK, and one of the moms, who's a prof at OU, says OU *does* have part-time tenure track. Maybe things are changing a bit? I had always observed that tenure track was disappearing, retiring faculty being replaced by adjunct and contract hire. No security, no benefits.
 

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I work at another OSU . . . :)

We have part-time tenure track and the University has been doing a fairly good job trying to legitimize it as a viable and apporpriate choice for female and male faculty with young children. The sad truth though is that for faculty at a research U, part-time work is still 40-50 hours a week.

On the plus side, I have heard that we have a new policy that all new campus construction must include space for lactation/nursing rooms. :)
 

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Work/life balance, being a mom and raising kids is often difficult in any male-dominated field... whether being a professor, or in the math/science/tech side.

While this isn't always the case, too many times, these particular fields are not necessarily willing to give women part time jobs or give them alternative work schedules, b/c they are expecting women to work the same 60+ hours they were working before kids and that their male counterparts are working.

The above is not always accurate, but it was in my experience. Being a senior woman in a technical field (in which the company DID have alternative work policies in place), I found that the managers there were unwilling to discuss many of these items.

I had a child that was colicky, was waking up 1-2 hours ever night, was very high needs, and was pretty much projectile vomiting 10+ times a day. (oh and I lost my sitter during all of this) When I asked for an extention on my leave, the response was a whole extra 2 weeks, and then they expected me to return to my job in a fulltime capacity. Never mind my performance record, or how long I had contributed to the company.

What mattered is that they had a warm body (even if incompetent), that could work 60+ hours. While I could have fought things via HR, it wasn't worth it to work in a group and with people that were that moronic.

Sadly, for every 'good' story I've heard about an employer in those sorts of fields, I've heard a 'bad' story.

The brain drain of women in these fields has a fairly strong correlation to managers unwilling to realize that a bit of accomondation in the relative short term would pay off LARGE for a company in the long term.

Tammy
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by quaz View Post
Work/life balance, being a mom and raising kids is often difficult in any male-dominated field... whether being a professor, or in the math/science/tech side. ...

The brain drain of women in these fields has a fairly strong correlation to managers unwilling to realize that a bit of accomondation in the relative short term would pay off LARGE for a company in the long term.

Tammy
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