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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK- I'm trying to figure out whether to be upset about this or if it is just the way of the world.

My kids signed up for the library's summer reading program and all received coupons from Round Table for a free personal sized pizza after doing the required amount of reading. The fine print said: with purchase (I didn't see it before going in because it was not like that in other years). So I go into RT and order their pizzas and one for me, and the clerk said, "no, you must purchase one thing for each free pizza."

Now, how it is that RT is giving something to the kids through the library if they expect me to buy basically an equal cost of items? It would probably be not a big deal if my kids drank soda, but they don't. Is this how all the reading / pizza programs work?

Chris-
At home, heating up a frozen pizza for the kids . . .
 

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Having worked in the public library system for many years, I can tell you that many libraries use (out of necessity due to low or no budget money available) prizes that are donated to them from local businesses. When I first started working in the library doing children's programming, summer reading program prizes where a stamp on your chart each week and/or stickers. Now there is such a big craze for prizes it is nuts. Beggars can't be choosers, so perhaps that was all that your library managed to scrounge up for their summer rewards.

Teresa Jo
 

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That's odd. We've moved a lot so we've done lots of summer reading programs and I think that coupons that require a purchase are just odd.

My kids favorite part of summer reading programs is when they get to put something up on the wall of the library and then add stickers to it as they complete higher levels. I guess they are easily amused! This year it is animal shapes and the kids got to pick which animal and color.

I think the best reward I've seen was a family ticket (for 4 people) to a minor league baseball game that included parking. It was a super fun game -- they had one of the children's librarians throw in the first pitch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks everyone. I was avoiding the SMR with a passion because I hate the little toys, but they do a crazy pitch for it at the beginning of every storytime and event and have large displays telling the kids to sign up (and with a reader now, it is hard to bluff it). I wish it were stickers only.

I don't blame the library, but I would like it to be simplier. I just think it is kooky that the kids get a "prize" that is essentially a way for the store to make direct money (you would think the write off, the advertising and the good will would make them enough indirect money).
 

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We got our stuff from the local library.Most of the coupons required another item be bought before the free one was given.That was the pizza place and Denny's.We did get a coupon for a free ice cream cone,and I will get that one.The main prize for each of them was a little radio with the library logo on it.I got a cd case holder with the logo.

I told the kids they were getting these items for being such good patrons of the library,and respecting the rules and materials they were loaned
 

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This is our first year and my kids will get a child's admission to our county fair and a paperback book of their choice (from 3 or so titles)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Monica
This is our first year and my kids will get a child's admission to our county fair and a paperback book of their choice (from 3 or so titles)
Our library also lets the kids pick a paperback and my kids felt the selection was VERY slim!

In previous years, my kids were to keep track of the total amount of time they spent either reading or being read to, but our new library has them keep track of how many books they have read and only books checked out from the library count. It is really stupid. Although they both went through a brief phase of reading lots and lots of books that were simple for them, they are over it now and are back to selecting their reading based on what they are interested in rather than just the quickest way to chaulk up big numbers.

I think they are outgrowing the summer reading program
 

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Our library gives a free book, a couple trinkets (a button, a bookmark), a ticket to see the minor league baseball game (for the child only) and a ticket to a local museum (again, for the child only). I guess it does kind of have a purchase requirement unless you are going to send the kids into the stadium/museum alone. WE don't use the tickets because we don't like baseball and they've been to the museum a million times already.
 

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We did two reading programs this summer, one at home (big city), and one in my hometown (small town). I was more impressed with the small-town program.

The big one gives out some very cheezy little rewards (a sticker, a stretchy toy dinosaur that lasted 5 minutes, a cheap frizbee thing), culimnating with cheap seat ticket (child only) to a Diamondbacks baseball game (Major League). Aside from the baseball ticket (and including if you don't like baseball, but around here it's popular), pretty lame. The basis for progression was a choice of 20 minutes of reading, 1 book, or 50 pages of a book.

The small town program gave a prize for 3 hours of reading for preschoolers or 5 for school-aged children, either being read to or reading themselves. The prize progression was an inexpensive toy (rubber duckie, ball, that sort of thing), passes (for child and parent) to a pool party at the rather cool swimming pool at the in town university's activity center (indoor pool has a lazy river, some splash features, and a water slide), third prize in the progression was a paperback book, and there was a pretty good selection. For every 3/5 hours after that, children got one entry into a drawing for a red wagon for the preschoolers and a bicycle for the school-aged kids. Also, the activities were cool, drawing in older kids (jr. high/high school) as volunteers to read to the kids, do a book-based puppet show, etc., as well as local celebrities (local news people, that sort of thing). We didn't make it to many of the activities, but the one we did go to I was impressed with.
 

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Our library gives different prizes based on how much the kids have read.

4 hours=ticket for local baseball team (no ticket for parents) and coupon for free personal pizza and drink (no purchace needed)

4 more hours=prize choice from trinket box (small books, puzzles etc)

4 more hours= choice of ticket for county fair or pumpkin patch/corn maze (again kid admission only) and another choice from trinket box

4 more hours=book of their choice

Also for every 4 hours the kids read they can enter a drawing for misc. prizes at the end of the summer. Educational games, board games, book collections--all really nice prizes.

We used the pizza coupons and may use the pumpkin patch coupon depending on how much an adult ticket is. My oldest reads at least an hour a day so he was done with the reading program before June was over
Although he still gets to enter his name in the drawing for each additional 4 hours. He'd read regardless of the prizes, but still enjoys getting them
 
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