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And to think that certain folk say stroller bashing came only from elitist APers calling them 'baby buckets'! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Not so.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">NAIROBI, Kenya -- Irene Wambui can't imagine why anyone would buy a baby stroller. She says she sees it as a cold cage filled with useless rattles, cup holders and mirrored headlights. Imagine children being stuffed into such a contraption and pushed around town like some kind of pet.<br><br>
Across Africa, women can be seen carrying sleeping or sometimes giggly babies on their backs, swathed in cloth. The babies move to the sway of their mothers' hips, synchronized throughout the day, bending with them as they collect water or sweep the floor and rising again when the women stop to rest. They hang on as their mothers sell food in the market or pray at a church or mosque.<br><br>
Irene's boss and manager, Zara Esmail, was pacing back in forth in front of the strollers one recent day. She said the store had sold only one baby stroller in two months, and that was to a visiting U.N. worker from Britain, who complained later that she had been disappointed by the small selection.<br><br>
"The pram is the ultimate in pushing the baby away from you," said Frank Njenga, a child psychiatrist in Nairobi, Kenya's bustling capital. "The baby on the back is actually following the mother in warmth and comfort. The baby feels safer, and safer people are happier people."</td>
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<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?node=admin/registration/register&destination=register&nextstep=gather&application=reg30-world&applicationURL=http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A34654-2004May17.html" target="_blank">http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp...2004May17.html</a>
 

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great article. thanks!
 

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I absolutely 100% agree with the article.<br><br>
But we (or at least I do!) live in a much different environment than E. Africa. It's one of the issues I had when reading the Continuum Concept. Yes, it all obviously makes sense, and is the most natural way of carrying and raising children, but we don't live in such primitive, natural environments here in the U.S. anymore. Sometimes I sure would like to though!
 

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:LOL I'm feeling guilty and delighted at the same time. Never had that happen before! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/kewl.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="kewl">
 

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That is a really great article... I think the idea of westernizing (??) their parenting is awful. They do it just fine already <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I liked this part
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">"There are customs from a hundred years ago that are not relevant today for Africans. Our challenge is to pick the good from the bad," said Carol Mandi, managing editor of EVE, an East African women's magazine. "But carrying on your back, well, that is just a wonderful custom that keeps the baby emotionally stable and lets the mother feel bonded. We can't stop being African women just because we are suddenly thrust into the modern world. What next? They will tell us to stop breast feeding in public? No way."</td>
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I liked it until the closing line: <i>"It's just not Kenyan," she said. "For the child, the love will not be there if the child is cooped up in such an antisocial device." She purchased her bottles and left.</i><br><br>
Yes, I know that there are a lot of reasons moms would have to use formula, but from things I've heard about the Nestle boycott over the years, abm companies have made strides in convincing moms to go with abm. Ultimately that will cost a lot more than a stroller and have a more negative impact on health. That last line almost seems like a deliberate slant by the writer, though. I wonder.
 

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i read a similar version of this article in a san fran paper.<br><br><a href="http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/05/20/MNG6Q6O4LI1.DTL" target="_blank">http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cg...NG6Q6O4LI1.DTL</a><br><br>
i love it! however, i must admit i love my "jogging" stroller very much, tho it's rarely ever used. it came in very handy w/going to the mall to try on a new bra or something & timing it when my ds would sleep. Also, my boys are very big and heavy. Afteran hour of carrying my 20-something lb 5-mon-old in my wrap, my shoulders are killing me. i still don't use the stroller w/ him yet. He's too young. As he gets bigger and older, however, i can see a time when it might come in handy.<br><br>
having said all that, we've just mastered the backwearing in my wrap. i even cooked a meal w/him in it!!!!!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br>
i read the article the other day and really enjoyed it.
 
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