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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thoughts anyone? I have heard that children often outgrow their "allergies." Would this be the case here? DD has no IgE or IgG allergies to food, so I presume her food reactions to gluten and dairy are food intolerances/sensitivities. Since it is not a true IgE or IgG allergy, would she be able to outgrow it? Would you still discourage even just occasional eating of gluten and dairy to "strengthen" the body (as I've been told)? She eats the kindergarten school lunch, which occasionally (roughly 3 or 4 times a month) serves wheat dishes like noodles, but still reacts (itchy legs, canker sores, mucus in eyes and nose).
 

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The body isn't strengthened by "occasional eating". Hypothetically, the body can be conditioned to not react to a food when given tiny amounts regularly, and then possibly increasing the amount at each serving. This is not the same as eating a dish of wheat noodles now and then.

I would pay attention to things like mood swings and general malaise due to consuming foods that should remain out of the diet. Be mindful. When the symptoms are severe we pay more attention than when the symptoms are negative but more subtle. It might mean you can let down your guard some, though.

Dairy *allergies* are usually but not always outgrown. Dairy intolerance-- at least lactose intolerance-- seems to get worse with age. The latter is anecdotal experience from my lactose intolerant family, and my daughter is still allergic to dairy at 10.5yo, which is highly unusual.

This is absolutely not the case for celiac, where even small amounts should be avoided if a person is symptomatic. (Celiac is not the only reason someone can be sensitive or intolerant to wheat and gluten.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ahhh, so it's probably NOT a good idea for her to have those occasional wheat dishes. I will try to see if I am allowed to substitute those school lunch dishes on those heavy wheat days then.

A while back, I read from another thread here about the dogtorj.com website about how wheat, dairy, (soy, and corn) were really bad to consume and it went into a lot of detailed explanation. Recently I've watched some videos about how VERY important the human microbiome is to health. And so now I have more questions. I'm wondering,..... for those who don't have the true IgE and IgG allergies (in which case, I suppose avoidance is the best bet)......but for those with just food sensitivities/intolerances, could it be that wheat and dairy are not inherently bad? By that, I mean that if the gut bacteria could be strengthened to its maximum potential, the way a healthy microbiome should be, is it then that those food sensitivities/intolerances could go away? Has anyone mulled over this already and come to any sort of conclusion or had personal experience?
 

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There's probably wheat in other meals, soy sauce, flour thickeners for stews, breaded foods, etc. Just something to be alert to if she does start getting more sensitive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I have been alert to that, but as it is an important point to be aware of, thanks for bringing that up. DD doesn't seem to be bothered by those small amounts. It's only when the amount drastically increases that she starts to get reactions. I wonder though: if tiny amounts of intolerable foods are regularly consumed without signs of reactions, would that then lead to an inability to overcome her food sensitivity? The hypothesis that SweetSilver mentions, is that to be believed or not? No conclusive decision on that yet?


Here's another puzzle I have .... DS (6) was tested again last year and according to the lab result, has a very small IgE reaction to egg, but nothing for wheat or dairy. However, from what I see, he has obvious reactions to wheat and dairy, but NOT egg. Why the discrepancy?
 

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Tests are rather fuzzy. They should not be relied on in and of themselves. They can be helpful, but the gold standard is the challenge. Chances are good here that the egg was a false positive. False negatives are less common. Even so, different allergens-- and intolerances-- can have reactions that aren't necessarily visible in smaller quantities, but the afflicted person can feel (yup, first hand experience here). I can only *see* what is happening when my daughter reacts. If you are not seeing anything from egg, and if your daughter complains of no discomfort, chances are very good the test was wrong.

I don't keep up on the specific research, but there is evidence that small *infinitesimal* doses of peanut can reduce the severity of a reaction. These particular tests are under doctor supervision, but some allergists are optimistic for other foods. (This follows the logic of the allergy-shot treatment for environmental allergies which works for some people.) If the reaction is not anaphylactic, certainly you can try this method, but the results would be difficult to ascertain except perhaps in the long run. The same goes for gut bacteria theory. Same goes for merely waiting it out. Unfortunately, so much about allergies is anecdotal.

Even less is known about intolerances, it seems, since there is no definitive diagnostic test for them, and results rely on the individual. Again, if this isn't an anaphylactic reaction, you have some leeway to experiment. I am always mindful, however, that regular consumption of food the body doesn't like can have a cumulative effect.
 

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When the elderly stop having allergies, family members are notified that the person's immune system is shutting down. I question the thinking that children "outgrow" food allergies. The immune system may, being too overwhelmed to cope, begin shutting down, but that hardly seems like a good thing.
 
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