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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every summer, our neighborhood daycare (which I truly love) hires several college students, since they have so many more kids/ summer camps when public schools are out. This means that the teacher I LOVE is working with the school-aged kids and two nineteen-year-old girls are taking care of the toddlers.<br><br>
Nothing has gone horribly wrong, and I'm confident everyone is safe, but these girls are just so... loud. The former teacher was a really gentle person that gave all of the kids fabulous individual attention, but these girls are more like shouty, energetic camp counselors herding them into forming a line and whipping up a frenzy in the process. It stresses me out to be in that room for five minutes at pick-up time-- I can't imagine a full day of their company. When they give me the daily report on Birdy, it sounds more like tattling than informing.<br><br>
I've been noticing some behavior changes in my Bird, more shouting, more tantrums, more acting-out attention seeking.<br><br>
TWICE, she has gone into the bathroom in her class (no diapers in several months, woo hoo) and stood IN FRONT OF THE TOILET, undies on and everything, and peed her pants. I can't help but think it's an attention cry or an act of defiance.<br><br>
These girls will be gone in August, and all in all they are keeping the kids busy and safe. But still. How should I handle this? Should I handle it at all? It's breaking my heart that I'm sitting here at my #$#&$*%^$ job while my gentle little person is having her nerves jangled all day.
 

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I feel like it should be handled. A month or two is a long time for a little person. It is, frankly, a long time for me.<br><br>
I would sit down with the center about Birdy's potty issues - it does sound to me like there's an attention issue there. Do these girls understand that you can't just point a toddler at the potty? That there's more to the job than that? Work from those to the whole classroom atmosphere issue.<br><br>
What supervision are the nineteen year-olds getting? Do they have adequate resources to provide good care? How many kids are they looking after and what, if any, advice to they get?
 

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Hm.... I'd be angry if my younger child was switched from familiar caregivers to new ones for the summer. But certainly if the atmosphere is stressful for your child you should bring it to the attention of the teachers and the director. It seems likely that 19 YOs are not well versed in toddler dynamics, unless they are in process towards ECE degrees. "This seems very loud and over stimulating to toddlers" is a good way to start, I think.<br><br>
I would be careful about blaming potty issues on this directly though -- you might be reading a lot into something and who knows what motivates toddlers sometimes! But certainly "This is happening, what can we do to solve it" seems fair.
 

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I agree with you that overstimulation can cause lots of problems in children. Can you chat with the director about it? She may also have concerns but not know how to approach it.<br><br>
Re: the potty issue, that seems within the realm of normal for a child that is just learning. I think I would focus more on the overall rhythm of the program. There should be times for "up" energy and times for "down" energy in any quality program.<br><br>
ETA: I can remember being a 19, 20, 22 yr old working in child care programs and thinking I knew a lot about kids. When I think back to how little I knew, I cringe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for everyone's help. There was an incident with Bird's lunch (I always send a substitute for the meat, OFTEN it's a sunflower butter + honey sandwich, and teachers thought it smelled like peanut butter yesterday so just DIDN'T GIVE IT TO HER, ugh) which gave me the perfect open door to start a conversation with the associate director about it. She acknowledged that they had concerns about the experience and energy in that room and promised to make herself very present in the class and give the girls some guidance. They are both very sweet and doing the best they can-- and I hope the A.D. will handle this gently with them, as well!<br><br>
Anyway, I needed the extra support on this one. Thanks, Mamas!
 

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Commiserating here!<br><br>
DS is also in a toddler room with two women under 21, who are also very loud. Loud music, loud shouting and cheering, high energy running, etc. Our home is pretty quiet (as are we), and I worried about DS being a little crazy. It made me crazy--10 toddlers running around like that! Most of the kids seem to love it most of the time, dancing to the music, etc. There does seem to be that kind of "rhythm"--there is a strict schedule they follow, and not all of it is so loud! And the young women are always directing their high energy at playing with all the kids, engaging them very well.<br><br>
But I have worried about DS getting stressed and overstimulated. However, he doesn't seem to be showing any signs of wear and tear. He is shouting and shrieking a lot more at home, which could be a developmental thing (he's working on speech) or mimicking the volume he hears all day. And, for the first time in his life, he is taking a decent nap--1-2 hours every afternoon, when the rest of the class sleeps too! So maybe the chaos is wearing him out? And the contrasting quiet is enough to help him sleep?<br><br>
I too have gone back and forth about whether or not to say anything, but have held off so far because he seems otherwise happy. And, like you, he'll only be in this room for another two months or so.<br><br>
However, given the potty issues with your DD, I would take that as a sign of stress and use it as a chance to speak up to the whole concern.
 

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Don't know if this makes sense, but it sounds like the 19-year old "camp counselor" types would be perfect for the school-aged kids who like the whole energy laden camp type experience. Why not put the 19 year olds with them and move your fave teacher back to the younger kids? I know it's not your choice, but could you try asking about this? It just seemed so obvious when I read your post - and utilizes everyone's strengths effectively.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bronxmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11604996"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Don't know if this makes sense, but it sounds like the 19-year old "camp counselor" types would be perfect for the school-aged kids who like the whole energy laden camp type experience. .</div>
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I agree, that would make the most sense! I got a call today from the associate director... it seems my favorite teacher actually left the center (he was so talented there was little hope he'd stay at a daycare for long, sadly) so we won't have him back. They are going to be moving a more experienced toddler teacher to the room next week. Obviously I was not the only one with concerns, but I'm glad I spoke up!
 
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