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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so we just got an 8-week old yellow lab on Wednesday. He is adorable and of course my two boys just LOVE him!! I am having a really hard time adjusting though. He is just as hard as having a baby, seriously! But I expected it to be hard, I just can't seem to get a grip. I guess it's one thing to expect it, but another to actually live it, lol.
I have been having crying spells and am contemplating returning him to the breeder. I think my main problem is that I can't even be a mom to my kids. I haven't had much time to read to them, play games with them, etc. When the puppy is awake, he needs to be watched CONSTANTLY to prevent accidents. I feel like I can't even go pee. Again, I expected this, I don't know why I'm having such a hard time dealing. I realize it's only been a few days that we've had him so I need to just give it time. I haven't gotten very much sleep and I've had a cold so I know that makes things a million times harder. I guess I expected to be enjoying him more than I am, he just feels like a lot of work right now. One thing that's really freaking me out is that before we got him, I was expecting things to be hard for a month or two but then settle down. But everyone keeps telling me that things will be tough for at least a year and maybe even 2 years. WHAT?!?! There is no way I can live like this for 1 year, let alone 2. No way. I would lose my mind.

Ugh, just needed to vent. Please no flaming....yes, I did do my research.

Thanks for listening!
 

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No advice just hugs
s

DP got a pup shortly after we bought our house. It was *his* dog. A bird hunting buddy. He saved up small pieces of copper wire (dp is an electrician) to recycle and bought him with that money.
Right after we got him dp started to work overtime and did not have much time with his new pup. It was a nightmare. I did everything I thought I could do. He ended up as an outside only dog (something that I did NOT want) because he was so misbehaved. I personally was not ready for having it all dumped on me. Dp had promised me that it was his dog and he would take 100% responsibility for him. (yah right)
We ended up getting a mutt off of freecycle to be a companion to DPs dog. I agreed that the new dog would be mine. Well new dog and pup hated each other. "give it time" Nope, after 6 months they still hated each other. Pup was still out of control. We ended up giving away DPs dog. And I have vowed to never, never, ever get a puppy again. EVER!!

The freecycle dog was almost 2 when we got him. He had been abused in his old home.
It took him awhile to worm up to DP (it was a man who abused him) But he is the best dog ever. Link to youtube vid of him He is a perfect fit for our family.

Just two days ago we got offered a young yellow lab. Our neighbor has a one and he wanted to know if we wanted one (another from the same litter) I admit, they are dang cute!!! Good dogs too. But my rule stands firm. No. Puppy. Ever. In. My. Life. lol. Unless it is a Bloodhound, then I might actually think about it. Maybe.

Congrats on your new little one. And I bow to you and your patients and dedication.
 

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Having a puppy is the same as having a baby. He is a baby. Sounds like it is all on you and that is hard. I would assume it gets better when it the potty training is complete???

I thought yellow labs were the most mellow? That would be what I would get, except I really really am a cat person. They are so easy to care for. And if you get the right cat (pure luck) it is like a cross between the perfect cat and perfect dog combined. I had one like that and it was bliss. I miss him
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, we have a cat too and I'm very grateful for him right now.


I just vented to my dh and his response was, "Oh, don't worry, it will all work out." Ha! That's a man for you....
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sarathan View Post
Yeah, we have a cat too and I'm very grateful for him right now.


I just vented to my dh and his response was, "Oh, don't worry, it will all work out." Ha! That's a man for you....

Yeah, I've taken care of my brother's dog on occasion, and definitely the cats are SO much easier!

We had labs growing up, the reason why they say 2 years is because they have a lot of puppy habits that they take a long time to outgrow. Our last dog growing up was a lab, and OMG, it was more like 3 years. He chewed through a wall.
Ate up my dolls, chewed two holes in the carpet. Oh, yeah, it's a GOOD idea to get a crate if you haven't already! The girls here can tell you about that. My parents apparently thought our mud room was good enough for keeping ours confined...that is, until he started eating into a corner of the room! ACK!

Labs can be really destructive and hyper, and they really need to be exercised every day to make them managable. Ours only got good exercise when my brother (his owner) was home from college. He needed around 1 hour of exhausting exercise a day. When he didn't get that exercise, he was SO hyper! He finally did mellow somewhat in his teens, a couple of years before he died. They're a really high energy breed and are good with really active people.
 

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Ive been there done that, actually living it . with a 16 m old black lab. We got her at 8 weeks. I didnt NOT want a puppy. Dh insisted we get a puppy so it will be with the kids blah blah. the kids are 6,11 and 16. and we already had a dog. but I caved.
yeah well it has been the worst year (I say that with love) ever. I am still living it. shes just bigger, and the challenges change weekly.

some advice

1. GO to training classes early. Start with a puppy class and move up. start as early as you can
2. crate
3. lots and lots of exercise. on top of lots and lots of exercise.
4. get Kongs, and things to chew on.

I really dont want to scare you. She is a good dog, and she is most definatly still a puppy.
 

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The breeder should have told you that Labs are puppies until they are 3. They are naughty, they will chew and eat ANYTHING, (car doors, couches, walls...) and they have tons of energy.

The good news is that people who love Labs adore them and I am sure it is their wonderful personality. They really are sweet and will be a great dog for your kids.

Go to class, use a crate, and get the dog TONS of exercise. Spay or neuter it at 6 months, for sure. Then you should be okay.
 

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puppies are so much work - and then some when you already have a young family! i don't know how you feel about a crate but could you use it every now and again to give yourself a break? it will get easier, so hang in there!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sarathan View Post
But everyone keeps telling me that things will be tough for at least a year and maybe even 2 years. WHAT?!?! There is no way I can live like this for 1 year, let alone 2. No way. I would lose my mind.
I'm sorry to say this, but yes. We got Chaos at around 6-8 months old and she was still nutty. About 1-1.5 years is when she mellowed a bit (i.e. I didn't have to watch her like a hawk so she didn't chew on everything) but it varies by breed and individual dog. Labs do seem to keep their puppy personalities longer from what I've seen, but the people who love them enjoy this.
 

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Been there, done that but with a German Shep/ Grey Hound mix. I took her back on day 3 and got her back on day 4. That was almost 14months ago. It was the accidents that got to me. My carpet still smells! Everyone else says it doesn't but I swear it does.
Keep her on a leash with you unless she is crated. Go to puppy training as soon as possible, or get a good book so you can learn what to do. Learn to adjust to what is happening because of the dog. Remind yourself that this is 18 years of childhood condensed into 2 or 3 years but at the end of it your dog will be so loved and adored that it is well worth it. Do you have any doggy parks near you? If so as soon as all the vax are done get access to it.

Come here and vent!
 

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Hang in there! All of the labs I have ever met while walking dogs at the humane society have been exhausting until they were 2 or 3, but the crate training, puppy classes and lots of excercise make it all worth it in the end. They grow to become sweet, loyal and wonderful family dogs. My american eskimos were easy to train and never chew anything, but I wouldn't really consider them great family dogs for people with young children and they bark like you have never heard before. My point is....that there isn't a such thing as a perfect dog, but if you stick it out and put the effort forth now.....the returns in the end will make it worth it. That dog will teach empathy, trust and responsibility that is hard to duplicate anyway else. I can't begin to tell you how many labs come into our shelter around the age of 1. People love them when they are cute and dump them when the going gets tough.

Is there anyway you can delgate some of the responsibility?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by gumby74 View Post
Hang in there! All of the labs I have ever met while walking dogs at the humane society have been exhausting until they were 2 or 3, but the crate training, puppy classes and lots of excercise make it all worth it in the end. They grow to become sweet, loyal and wonderful family dogs.
ITA!! Retrievers, including labs and goldens, are notoriously high-maintenance as puppies (color has no bearing on this temperament). But with good training, they become the best grown-up buddies a family can have.

If you went through an ethical breeder, s/he should be a phone call away if you want to shout out an SOS and get some advice. A good breeder will do everything possible for this match to work.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by gumby74 View Post
Hang in there! All of the labs I have ever met while walking dogs at the humane society have been exhausting until they were 2 or 3, but the crate training, puppy classes and lots of excercise make it all worth it in the end. They grow to become sweet, loyal and wonderful family dogs. My american eskimos were easy to train and never chew anything, but I wouldn't really consider them great family dogs for people with young children and they bark like you have never heard before. My point is....that there isn't a such thing as a perfect dog, but if you stick it out and put the effort forth now.....the returns in the end will make it worth it. That dog will teach empathy, trust and responsibility that is hard to duplicate anyway else. I can't begin to tell you how many labs come into our shelter around the age of 1. People love them when they are cute and dump them when the going gets tough.

Is there anyway you can delgate some of the responsibility?
Oh my, I never knew so many labs were being dumped off at shelters.
Yes, my dh and oldest son help out the best they can.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
ITA!! Retrievers, including labs and goldens, are notoriously high-maintenance as puppies (color has no bearing on this temperament). But with good training, they become the best grown-up buddies a family can have.

If you went through an ethical breeder, s/he should be a phone call away if you want to shout out an SOS and get some advice. A good breeder will do everything possible for this match to work.
I did go through a great breeder. I haven't called yet, but I know she would help me if/when I do call.
 

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The two things that will get you through the next two years are obedience training and daily exhaustion (for the puppy). If you can't get the dog out for at least two LONG walks a day, consider taking everyone to the dog park in the afternoon or hire a dog walker. (You can probably get an older neighborhood kid to do it cheap.) Or send him to doggie daycare, if you have the means. A tired dog really is a good dog, and if you can get help with the housetraining, even better. Maybe make it a game with your kids to see who spots the doggie going on the pad or whatever.

Good luck!
 

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Hi. I am just checking out this board for the first time.


I breed Australian Labradoodles. And they are smart and relatively mellow, though each dog is different. A lab is usually mellow too... but there are some hyper ones, it depends on where you got the dog from and the breeder...

Regardless, you have to crate train. I know, it's the opposite of how we parent.

But, they are dogs not humans. They actually do feel comfort by being in a den.And before I was a breeder, I wouldn't have been so adamant on crate training. I have always done a form of crate training at night with my dogs though, I just used a big box.
The crate training makes a huge difference in our lives. When our adult dogs are in a crate, they usually won't even bark, if someone comes to the door! It's amazing. All of our dogs go into their crates on their own during the day, just to rest. And even puppies that originally complained about the crate, will later see it as a place of relief (make sure your kids don't bother them in the crate
).

Get some chew toys and bully sticks (no raw hide, ever) put the goodies in the crate first, and then place the puppy in the crate when you need a break. As soon as you take the puppy out, take him out to pee and tell him "go potty" (or whatever - the same command each time).

As a previous post mentioned, tou can tether him to you with two leashes (one around your waist, with the leash slipped through the hand loop, and then attached to a second leash that is attached to the pup). You do this while you move around the house. The pup learns to stay near you and you can watch it (keep a doggy toy with the pup too). Or, you can use a play pen area, but just like the crate, you have to monitor the time he is in there and then take him out to potty every hour or so. You want lots of toys and depending on what you feed your pup, you can use doggy food as training rewards or in kongs.

Here is a good site to help with crate training:
http://www.training-dogs.com/crate-training.html

It is true all dogs stay "puppies" to some degree until around age 2. That includes the chewing stage, which chewing can be the hardest part, when you have kids and toys. We have half of our house gated off, so that the dogs can't go into the rooms with all the toys.
You could gate off one room, as the doggy's free play room, but when it is this young you should still be watching the pup. Though, I have to admit we are not always watching a puppy (we often keep one from a litter until it is 4-6months to evaluate it). We do use a doggy door, and our pups learn right away how to go outside, and they also learn to take themselves outside to potty.
Some of your potty issues will depend on the the breeder. If the breeder began potty training, or if the breeder used a potty area in the puppy area, then you are off to a better start. If the dog just peed where ever it was was... you will have a harder time.

Also, eight weeks is still very young. Hopefully the puppy was with it's litter mates and mother up until eight weeks of age, bc it needs that interaction with other dogs in order to learn doggy manners. We prefer to let our pups go home at 9.5-10 weeks for this reason.

If you are having any nipping problems, be sure to cry out and pretend like it really hurts. That is how puppies learn to control their biting...

I also like Patricia McConnell a lot, she is a zoologist and doggy behaviorist. http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/ The Other Side of the Leash is a great book about doggy behavior, it's not a training manual though. She does have training books too...

Good luck!
 

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About exercise, with a young lab, you DO NOT want to go on long walks. This is an environmental factor that is strongly associated with hip-dysplasia And is especially important in larger sized dogs (lab size and up). Their joint's are still forming and you can do permanent damage...same with stairs, avoid going up and down stairs with a young lab. You should carry the pup up and down, until it is to heavy to carry. (obviously once in a while on stairs is no biggy, but not multiple times every day).

You do want to play with the dog and get him tired, but play sessions should be about 20 minutes in length (that's as long as a walk should be at this age too). Once we got 3 pups at the same time. I would go outside in the yard and run in large circle, calling them with a high pitched voice "puppy run", they would run behind me for about 5-10 laps, or whatever I could manage.

The puppy should get to control the amount of running it wants to do, don't over do it. If it looks tired and wants to lie down, let it.

We recommend waiting 18 months for long walks (at least 12 months), I am sure your breeder would say the same...

Andee
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
Hi. I am just checking out this board for the first time.


I breed Australian Labradoodles. And they are smart and relatively mellow, though each dog is different. A lab is usually mellow too... but there are some hyper ones, it depends on where you got the dog from and the breeder...

Regardless, you have to crate train. I know, it's the opposite of how we parent.

But, they are dogs not humans. They actually do feel comfort by being in a den.And before I was a breeder, I wouldn't have been so adamant on crate training. I have always done a form of crate training at night with my dogs though, I just used a big box.
The crate training makes a huge difference in our lives. When our adult dogs are in a crate, they usually won't even bark, if someone comes to the door! It's amazing. All of our dogs go into their crates on their own during the day, just to rest. And even puppies that originally complained about the crate, will later see it as a place of relief (make sure your kids don't bother them in the crate
).

Get some chew toys and bully sticks (no raw hide, ever) put the goodies in the crate first, and then place the puppy in the crate when you need a break. As soon as you take the puppy out, take him out to pee and tell him "go potty" (or whatever - the same command each time).

As a previous post mentioned, tou can tether him to you with two leashes (one around your waist, with the leash slipped through the hand loop, and then attached to a second leash that is attached to the pup). You do this while you move around the house. The pup learns to stay near you and you can watch it (keep a doggy toy with the pup too). Or, you can use a play pen area, but just like the crate, you have to monitor the time he is in there and then take him out to potty every hour or so. You want lots of toys and depending on what you feed your pup, you can use doggy food as training rewards or in kongs.

Here is a good site to help with crate training:
http://www.training-dogs.com/crate-training.html

It is true all dogs stay "puppies" to some degree until around age 2. That includes the chewing stage, which chewing can be the hardest part, when you have kids and toys. We have half of our house gated off, so that the dogs can't go into the rooms with all the toys.
You could gate off one room, as the doggy's free play room, but when it is this young you should still be watching the pup. Though, I have to admit we are not always watching a puppy (we often keep one from a litter until it is 4-6months to evaluate it). We do use a doggy door, and our pups learn right away how to go outside, and they also learn to take themselves outside to potty.
Some of your potty issues will depend on the the breeder. If the breeder began potty training, or if the breeder used a potty area in the puppy area, then you are off to a better start. If the dog just peed where ever it was was... you will have a harder time.

Also, eight weeks is still very young. Hopefully the puppy was with it's litter mates and mother up until eight weeks of age, bc it needs that interaction with other dogs in order to learn doggy manners. We prefer to let our pups go home at 9.5-10 weeks for this reason.

If you are having any nipping problems, be sure to cry out and pretend like it really hurts. That is how puppies learn to control their biting...

I also like Patricia McConnell a lot, she is a zoologist and doggy behaviorist. http://www.patriciamcconnell.com/ The Other Side of the Leash is a great book about doggy behavior, it's not a training manual though. She does have training books too...

Good luck!

Quote:

Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
About exercise, with a young lab, you DO NOT want to go on long walks. This is an environmental factor that is strongly associated with hip-dysplasia And is especially important in larger sized dogs (lab size and up). Their joint's are still forming and you can do permanent damage...same with stairs, avoid going up and down stairs with a young lab. You should carry the pup up and down, until it is to heavy to carry. (obviously once in a while on stairs is no biggy, but not multiple times every day).

You do want to play with the dog and get him tired, but play sessions should be about 20 minutes in length (that's as long as a walk should be at this age too). Once we got 3 pups at the same time. I would go outside in the yard and run in large circle, calling them with a high pitched voice "puppy run", they would run behind me for about 5-10 laps, or whatever I could manage.

The puppy should get to control the amount of running it wants to do, don't over do it. If it looks tired and wants to lie down, let it.

We recommend waiting 18 months for long walks (at least 12 months), I am sure your breeder would say the same...

Andee
This is all very helpful information, thank you!!


Crate training is going well, he cries less and less (if at all). I'm soooo glad we decided to crate train, I can't imagine having a puppy and NOT crate-training!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by OneLove View Post
About exercise, with a young lab, you DO NOT want to go on long walks. This is an environmental factor that is strongly associated with hip-dysplasia And is especially important in larger sized dogs (lab size and up).
I agree - no forced exercise for large breed puppies. Free play in a fenced area is ok as the puppy is able to stop when it needs a break, but on a leash they will go with you even if they hurt.

For stairs, it would depend how many we are talking IMO.
 
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