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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Both nipples have cracks in them, around the circumference, and I think nursing is preventing them from healing. It will start looking really good like its really starting to heal, but when I nurse it pulls it back open! I'm pretty sure her latch is good (but I definitely want to see an LC to be sure) Could I do more harm than good if I pumped and finger fed for a couple days? Just seeing her root scares me because I know its going to hurt! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I'm dying to get to the point where nursing is a nice snuggling time on the couch.
 

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Alls I can say is call your local LLL, and/or LC. Also maybe try a breastsheild in order to help yourself heal. Have you checked out Kelly mom? Oh also stay away from anything that may confuse the baby, pacifiers, bottles, all that kinda stuff. Good luck and definatly get some help! And don't give up, it will get better!! You are doing a great job momma! (((HUGS)))
 

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how old's your babe? Are you using lanolin? You need to get those cracks healed, but if you have a new babe I would HIGHLY DISCOURAGE pumping, but obviously in the interest of keeping up milk supply, ya gotta do what you gotta do. Here are some tips: from Kellymom<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Nurse frequently - at least every 2 hours. This will ensure that your baby does not become too hungry between feedings causing him to nurse ravenously and aggressively at your breast.<br><br>
The initial latch-on tends to hurt the worst - a brief application of ice right before latching can help to numb the area.<br><br>
If breastfeeding is too painful, it is very important to express milk from the injured side to reduce the risk of mastitis and to maintain supply. If pumping is too painful, try <a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bf-links-pumps.html" target="_blank"><span style="color:#0000FF;">hand expression</span></a>.<br><br>
You also may want to apply a 100% USP modified lanolin preparation, such as <a href="http://www.breastfeed-essentials.com/accessories.html#lanolin" target="_blank"><span style="color:#0000FF;">Purelan 100</span></a>, to your nipples after nursing. Apply enough to thoroughly coat the entire nipple/areola area. This does not need to be washed off prior to nursing as it is safe for baby to ingest. Recent studies seem to indicate that using 100% lanolin may hasten the healing process by maintaining the internal moisture of the skin. Avoid other creams and ointments sold for the treatment of sore nipples as these may actually impede healing by preventing air circulation and drying out the skin. Some of these other preparations may also be toxic to your baby and will need to washed off prior to nursing. Over-washing of the nipple area results in a loss of the natural lubricants that protect it and provide it with antibacterial properties.<br><br>
Change your nursing pads immediately once they become even slightly damp. Moisture up against your nipples can prolong healing. If your pad sticks to your nipple moisten it with water before attempting to remove it. Also avoid nursing pads with plastic linings. They prevent the flow of air which is essential to healthy nipples. Stick with <a href="http://www.breastfeed-essentials.com/accessories.html#pads" target="_blank"><span style="color:#0000FF;">100% cotton pads</span></a> or pads made of plain paper.<br><br>
Keep nipples exposed to air when possible. When wearing a bra, use fresh disposable pads (change when damp). Some mothers use breast shells to protect the nipple from the dampness and friction of the bra.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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I'd be afraid the pump would aggravate the injury more than nursing the baby.<br><br>
The first step with healing your cracked nipples should be finding the cause. Two common causes are poor positioning and thrush. I would definitely have baby's latched checked by a LC or LLL Leader. Baby should be tummy to tummy with you, and the nipple should be deep in her mouth.<br><br>
Lanisoh might help relieve the pain. Cooled gel packs on the sore nipple can help too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
she's 2 weeks old. A couple days ago I hand expressed from the right and nursed on the left, and now of course the left is the most painful..lol. I did find out that even though her latch was good, for the first week or so the positioning was BAD! A friend helped us get into a better position and it was like instant relief. The initial latch on is definitely the worst, and sometimes it feels fine after that, other times just a little better.. I've been using lansinoh like crazy, but a LLL leader said that on cracks, the lansinoh doesn't do any good, and to put antibiotic ointment on it to help it heal. She's never had a pacifier or a bottle
 

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Ask you dr. or mw for a script fo APNO oinment. I had the same issue in the first couple weeks and this ointment was suggested to me by an LC that I hired to visit us the first week. This stuff is a compound of several things (not sure exactly what) but it helped heal the cracks while i was still nursing. I also used a very thin nipple shield that not only protected my nipples, but helped her little jaw latch onto my huge boob. I have not had any of the typical issues associated with nipple shield use. I think the new ones are soooo thin and flimsy that they help just enough while allowing your baby to still get the same amount of milk they would get without it. The LC gave me the shield so i knew what size was best (i use the 20 mm).
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>katie9143</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7327592"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have not had any of the typical issues associated with nipple shield use. I think the new ones are soooo thin and flimsy that they help just enough while allowing your baby to still get the same amount of milk they would get without it.</div>
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I have heard this too. The new ones are so much better. Using nipple sheilds while you heal would probably be easier than pumping and finger feeding, and probably less risky to supply.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>katie9143</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7327592"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ask you dr. or mw for a script fo APNO oinment. I had the same issue in the first couple weeks and this ointment was suggested to me by an LC that I hired to visit us the first week. This stuff is a compound of several things (not sure exactly what) but it helped heal the cracks while i was still nursing. I also used a very thin nipple shield that not only protected my nipples, but helped her little jaw latch onto my huge boob. I have not had any of the typical issues associated with nipple shield use. I think the new ones are soooo thin and flimsy that they help just enough while allowing your baby to still get the same amount of milk they would get without it. The LC gave me the shield so i knew what size was best (i use the 20 mm).</div>
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I forgot about APNO! Here is a site with some info on what's in it. Works GREAT!! <a href="http://www.bflrc.com/newman/overheads/All%20Purpose%20Nipple%20Ointment.htm" target="_blank">http://www.bflrc.com/newman/overhead...20Ointment.htm</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sunnysideup</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7327735"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have heard this too. The new ones are so much better. Using nipple sheilds while you heal would probably be easier than pumping and finger feeding, and probably less risky to supply.</div>
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I have used a nipple shield from the beginning because I had flat nipples. It was GREAT when I had cracking and bleeding for the first (Oh OP don't read this!! I am sure yours won't last as long!) 2 months. I remember the TOE curling pain that it caused whenever she latched on, and all I could do was count my lucky stars that I had that shield. DD is 7 months old and aside from it just getting annoying sometimes, we are still using it w/o any problems. OP - if you choose to use one, I would recommend using one under guidance of an LC, and to wean as soon as you are healed and able to.
 

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If you can, expose your nipples to air and sunlight as much as possible (do you have a backyard?). It will help promote healing and prevent irritation from clothing. I had tons of nipple problems and spent my first 2 months with babe topless most of the time...it was like Tahiti over here! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just *briefly* met with an LC, and after one look at the massive cracks in my nipples, here's our plan:<br><br>
a mixture of cortizone, an antifungal, and neosporin to help healing<br>
15 minutes under a 60 watt light bulb 4 times a day<br>
using soothies<br>
pumping and finger feeding until they heal<br><br>
I rented a medela lactina for a week. I'm not too worried about supply because I feel like I have a *ton* of milk.. I can hand express 6 oz in 20 minutes. If anything, I think I have too much milk.<br><br>
After I feel a little more healed I will *definitely* be back to that LC for her to check latch and positioning
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Feeling lots better already <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I think just giving her pumped milk for a feeding or two every once in a while is enough of a break that I can nurse without being in pain. There was no way I wanted to deal with the finger feeder and then pumping over night so I just nursed her, and it wasn't bad at all! YAY! I fed her pumped milk once this morning then have been nursing her, and on one side it was completely painless (and I daresay felt good!) and the other side was just a little painful when she latched but after a few seconds felt fine. When it goes well like that, I love nursing instead of dreading it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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