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So, I'm having an argument with folks on another board about pacifires (bunch of guys), who don't believe me that pacifires can be bad, especially when nursing. I *know* they are, but I just don't have any good links to back it up with... any help?
 

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Tons of stuff here:<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/concerns/pacifier.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/concerns/pacifier.html</a>
 

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Oh, and if they are more of a "scientific research" bunch, go with this one:<br><a href="http://www.aap.org/advocacy/archives/marbreast.htm" target="_blank">http://www.aap.org/advocacy/archives/marbreast.htm</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carriebft</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8207630"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Tons of stuff here:<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/concerns/pacifier.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/concerns/pacifier.html</a></div>
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While I would agree generally I disagree about babies not needing to suck outside of feeding times. If this were true, I wouldn't see so many bottle-fed babies (including my daughter) who are consoled by pacifiers. I really think that comfort sucking is important to many babies, especially when they want to go to sleep (DD became a champion sleeper once she got a pacifier--sucks herself right to sleep). For that matter, I know of breastfed babies who had a major compulsion to suck and whose mothers resorted to the binkie to give their nipples a rest. Baby got plenty of feeds, there was no cycle of binkie replacing breast, but they needed that extra sucking.<br><br>
You certainly have to be careful with pacifier use, especially in the first 2 months when you're establishing your supply, but it's one of those things where (IMO) you can't make a blanket statement that they're bad. They just have to be used carefully.
 

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I was just giving the OP tons of stuff to choose from for her debate to prove that there is knowledge out there that pacifiers can be bad esp while nursing. Dont worry, I def agree that a paci can be a life saver depending on the child!
 

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A few of Katherine Dettwyler's articles discuss sucking/"non-nutritive" sucking etc.<br><a href="http://www.kathydettwyler.org/dettwyler.html" target="_blank">http://www.kathydettwyler.org/dettwyler.html</a>
 

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<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9271978&dopt=Abstract" target="_blank">Link to study on breast feeding and the use of pacifiers</a><br>
Righard L, Alade MO.<br><br>
Department of Pediatrics, University of Lund, University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden.<br><br>
BACKGROUND: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that incorrect sucking technique and pacifier use are factors contributing to breastfeeding failure. METHOD: The nursing patterns of 82 exclusively breastfeeding mother-infant pairs were observed 4 to 5 days postpartum on the maternity ward at University Hospital in Malmo, Sweden. The breastfeeding outcome and pacifier use was assessed by regular telephone contacts during a 4-month follow-up. RESULTS: The breastfeeding rate at 4 months was 91 percent in the nonpacifier group and 44 percent in the pacifier group (p = 0.03). An incorrect superficial nipple-sucking technique at the breast from the start combined with pacifier use resulted in early weaning in most cases. CONCLUSION: To promote successful breastfeeding and to reduce nursing problems, an incorrect sucking technique should be prevented or corrected, and the use of pacifiers should be avoided or restricted.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AlexisT</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I disagree about babies not needing to suck outside of feeding times. If this were true, I wouldn't see so many bottle-fed babies (including my daughter) who are consoled by pacifiers.</div>
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Breastfed babies use a different type of suck for comfort nursing, so that they do not receive much milk. A bottle fed baby may need a pacifier, because it is impossible to suck on a bottle without getting milk, and no reason to avoid the pacifier (since the problem with them is that they mess up bfing).<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AlexisT</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You certainly have to be careful with pacifier use, especially in the first 2 months when you're establishing your supply, but it's one of those things where (IMO) you can't make a blanket statement that they're bad. They just have to be used carefully.</div>
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For a certain number of babies, pacifier use will lead to decreased breastfeeding, nursing strike, or early weaning. This will happen for some babies no matter how "carefully" you use the pacifier. Since you can know if your baby will be one for which the pacifier will mess up breastfeeding, it's better to avoid them.
 
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