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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have any experience with this? I tore pretty badly with my other two births, and want to avoid that this time. Both times, I pushed completely on my own, so it's not like I had anyone telling me to push. But both labors were amazingly fast (less than 3 hrs), and I was told that my body didn't have time to adequately stretch because it was like having a "speeding train" come through me. It was always very easy for me to push so I just did, until baby was out. This time, I think I'm going to just breathe/moan through my contractions and if it takes longer, it takes longer, but I don't want to add any more pressure than the baby is already creating. Thoughts? Comments?
 

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Dropping in from September.<br><br>
My first two I pushed at will, but also determinedly. My last baby, that just felt all wrong, and I let her do it. She was my biggest and my first without stitches. I did push a little bit at the very end, but more because I was done than because I need to. I just forced myself to surrender to it all, and it really was fairly peaceful.
 

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Your plan sounds like the hypnobirthing "breathing the baby down" approach, and many people who have studied hypnobirthing have had great experiences with it. That's what I was thinking I might do but then in the moment it didn't feel like it would work and so I pushed. I know that my partner must have been grimmacing a bit when I decided to push, because he firmly believes in breathing as opposed to holding the breath, but it all worked out.
 

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With my 3rd DS, I went from dysfunctional labor (suuuuuper slow) to precipitous labor in the blink of an eye. So, I was in the tub when my water broke and my MW checked me to be 6cm and "tight." Within a very few minutes, my body was pushing. My MW had me not ADD to it - just breathe. When I finally got the hang of it (and realized that my body was pushing and therefore I was obviously ready and NOT hurting either me or the baby), it was amazing! I felt every sensation of him moving down because I could focus on it, and I just let it happen. I think *maybe* I pushed once after his head was out, but I ended up with nothing more than a skid-mark. Caught him myself just as I had wanted to, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
It was 17 minutes from the time my water broke at 6cm to the time I was holding him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"> So, yeah, I think letting your body push on its own can definitely help with a speedy birth!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know this sounds silly, but I have a few weird phobias about the birth itself, so I'm going to talk it through with my CNM, but am pretty sure that's what I'm going to try for. My first phobla involves FHR dropping as baby and cord are being compressed at the end of the birth canal, and the other is just a weird claustrophobia issue for the baby (I know, I know, that's crazy, but I can't help it!). So to think of baby just hanging out, moving down really slowly when I could have just pushed him/her out ten minutes ago weirds me out a little. But I think I have to do it that way for the sake of my perineum! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
Thanks for everyone's input!
 

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For me, the pushing phase was super fast, anyway. I don't think it would've saved much time to add to it, tho I'm sure it would've been more stressful on my perineum! Hope you're able to have exactly the birth you want! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Time to stretch is definitely important for the perineum, but there is also a lot you can do before the birth. One is sitting on the floor, cross legged (called tailor sitting). This actually helps tone and stretch your perineum. Practice squatting often too, I do it to pick things up instead of bending at the back. Kegels will also help tone and get it in shape which can help prevent tears.<br><br>
Some people will do perineal massage for the month or so before your due date---I've heard this can help, although I've never done it.<br><br>
Then when you're actually giving birth, consider a more prone position (typically lying on your back is not recommended). This will slow the baby's descent considerably, allowing more time to stretch.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>HeatherB</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15438780"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It was 17 minutes from the time my water broke at 6cm to the time I was holding him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"> So, yeah, I think letting your body push on its own can definitely help with a speedy birth!</div>
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I had a similar experience last time. They checked me, and I was at 6cm. They went to fill the birth tub, which takes about 20 minutes to fill. The baby was out before then. I also wasn't helping any on the pushing - it just happened.<br><br>
I did tear, but not enough that the midwife felt the need to stitch, and this was quite likely due to weakness caused by an episiotomy during my first birth.<br><br>
This time, I don't want to be checked, barring unusual circumstances that seem to call for it. My two prior experiences have shown that my feelings about my body's progress are more accurate than the standard interpretation of information provided by vaginal exams, and the checks just tend to be discouraging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Oliversmommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15439951"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Time to stretch is definitely important for the perineum, but there is also a lot you can do before the birth. One is sitting on the floor, cross legged (called tailor sitting). This actually helps tone and stretch your perineum. Practice squatting often too, I do it to pick things up instead of bending at the back. Kegels will also help tone and get it in shape which can help prevent tears.<br><br>
Some people will do perineal massage for the month or so before your due date---I've heard this can help, although I've never done it.<br><br>
Then when you're actually giving birth, consider a more prone position (typically lying on your back is not recommended). This will slow the baby's descent considerably, allowing more time to stretch.</div>
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DH and I took a Bradley class last time, so I'm very familiar with the tailor sittting, squatting, kegels, etc. I didn't do them as much as I should have, though. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> And we didn't do perineal massage because I had my doubts as to whether it would even help. I used to be a doula and always told my clients to do it though! And both of my births were with me in a semi-reclined state. Last one was a water birth. I'm a petite woman, but my babies are also petite -- 6 lbs 6 oz and 6 lb 7 oz. So I feel like I've been doing a lot of things "right", and this will be my last ditch effort!
 

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<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18226152" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18226152</a><br><br>
Interesting thread! I'd never heard of pd before, but am looking for a way to avoid the unbearable sensation of needing to push before I'm totally dilated.<br><br>
I found an interesting meta anlysis of several studies online... In summary, pd speeds second stage, reduces instrument assisted deliveries and increases spontaneous vag deliveries, but does not help reduce rate of laceration, episiotomy or c-sec. These were all epidural ladies, though. Just thought<br>
I'd bring this to Mzminty's attention since you're hoping to slow down labor and avoid trauma, and the study doesn't indicate either would likely be accomplished with pd.
 

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As far as the claustrophobia issue, the baby needs time to adjust to the outside world. The various sensations and compressions are actually like massage to the baby, squeezing out amniotic fluid, and working their lungs. A slower birth is better than a faster birth for the sake of the baby's adjustment. HTH a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Joe'sMama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15440319"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18226152" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18226152</a> Just thought I'd bring this to Mzminty's attention since you're hoping to slow down labor and avoid trauma, and the study doesn't indicate either would likely be accomplished with pd.</div>
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Thanks. I'd read those as well. It doesn't seem like there's a ton of information out there about it. Anecdotally, it seems like a good thing. And I think in my case, actively pushing has only caused trauma, so it's worth a try.<br><br>
Thanks, Just1More, in my head I know all that -- I"m just weird! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 
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