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Discussion Starter #1
posted from another board:<br><br>
Yesterday we went to Children's Hospital to get a Patch test. It is a newish test to look for delayed reactions. It is interesting. He has about 20 1/2 inch disks filled with babyfood taped against his back. They will stay there for 48 hours. We will go back on Thursday to have the results documented. The point of this test is to see if my son has a delayed reaction to foods. The other tests were for quick reactions.<br><br>
I already know through an elimination diet the results of all 20 foods. I am still interested to see if this test could make the diet results more official.<br><br>
Has anyone else thought of using a test like this?<br><br>
If this works, I am considering doing it on my own, filling my own disks with the few foods I'm not sure about.<br><br>
I will share results when I get them.<br><br><br>
RESULTS FROM TODAY:<br><br>
So we just got back from the unofficial reading of the Patch test.<br><br>
I am so flumuxed. I just can't believe it.<br><br>
So when I took the tape off Wed afternoon, Max had a series of reddish circles on his back. A few of them were very inflamed, spreading out from the disck/circles. This morning the inflammation went down but they were still there. This evening at the hospital the inflammation remained, with small amounts of bumps. This was on maybe 4 disk areas. One disk area was filled with tiny pus filled blisters. poor baby, no wonder he was itchy.<br><br>
Unofficial results, drumroll please. . . the blistered reaction was to CORN. We eat corn, he doesn't seem to react to corn, corn is in everything. The inflamed circles were for foods he supposedly does not react to: chicken and sweet potatoes. Ugh. now how about milk and eggs? the top reactors to his list of over 25 foods he can't eat.. . . . no reaction.<br><br>
We will be in contact the with doc to see what this all means.<br><br>
CORN!!!!! please don't take corn away from me!!!!<br><br>
anyone do this test?
 

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Yes, it was the patch test that gave us our corn diagnosis... The patch test only reveals non-IgE allergies. The skin prick test is its counterpart for IgE allergies. The patch test gave us 10 out of 30 positives when my dd was 10 months old. It did give us false positives for chicken, pork and potatoes... but to be fair, these really were mild intolerances for us according to the crystal test.<br><br>
According to our pedi allergist who has studied patch testing extensively, its an extremely finetuned process to read patch test results. You could fool around with it yourself, but I don't think I could trust the results without expert supervision. We had to have the patch removed at the office where they took notes upon removal, and then go back 24 hours later to have it officially read. I've also heard that some people have reactions delayed even further than 72 hours, and was told by our doc to continue watching for reactions/changes after we got home from the final appointment.<br><br>
As for the corn diagnosis, I would give elimination a try and see what happens. I had no idea that we were sensitive to corn until we pulled it (8 months after my TED) based on the patch test results. It took us 4 months to get things under control, but now we're more reaction free than we ever had been (and I thought we were at baseline before). Its definitely worth a try. Good luck!<br><br>
Lisa
 

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Man, I wish I could find someone in our area that does the patch test!! I have an appointment with a new ped allergist in a few weeks... maybe I can convince her to look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
wow interesting thank you<br><br>
they put a hydrocortisone cream on his back after it was read. so it is possible that it will destroy post 72 hour reactions.<br><br>
Did your pedi allergist only consider blister reactions a reaction? or would he have considered an inflammed area a reaction? I honestly don't trust the top notch pedi allergist who came in to help the tech read the results. She decided to dismiss the inflamed slightly bumpy patches. We did not see the "expert" Patch doctor. He was not in.<br><br>
oh, and they had us remove the patch ourselves 24 hours before we came in. They were not very interested in what I had to say about those reactions.<br><br>
ughh. This is Children's Hospital in Boston. Some of the best minds. . . .and I still am not impressed.<br><br>
Our previous skin prick and blood tests all came back negative.
 

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If you had reactions to things through food elimination, then I'd still keep them out of the diet, because that's supposedly the gold standard for food intolerances, according to all the books I've read (which are quite a number by this time). But any that were positive, I'd take out as well and see if that makes a difference. I thought I had most of my kids' down until I had the ALCAT test done, and even though there was 1 false negative on each, when I took the positives away, there was a BIG difference, and it was stuff they were having every day that I didn't "think" was causing reactions.
 

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Right. Reactions ALWAYS trump results. If the food is bad for your child then avoid it.<br><br>
Our pedi-allergist found reactions where I could see none. She examined the color and the texture and did much analysis with her eyes averted letting her fingers do the walking.<br><br>
Some people with non-IgE allergies don't pop positive to tests period. Actually, alot of people. The patch test seems most effective for identifying eczema triggers.<br><br>
Our worst reaction was from "fragrance mix". The skin was very inflamed far beyond the disk contact area. Then it became bleeding eczema and took several weeks to heal. We won't be testing it again. Ever.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>changingseasons</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12556690"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Man, I wish I could find someone in our area that does the patch test!! I have an appointment with a new ped allergist in a few weeks... maybe I can convince her to look into it.</div>
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If you ever find someone let me know. However, joybird says she looked high and low in the seattle area and never found someone who did this. It seems like such a great, non-invasive option. WHY OH WHY don't practioners know how to actually help us??????
 

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Discussion Starter #8
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mtn.mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12557794"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Our pedi-allergist found reactions where I could see none. She examined the color and the texture and did much analysis with her eyes averted letting her fingers do the walking.<br></div>
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If ours did this, they would have picked up at least 4 more reactions. grrrrrr.<br>
I am really p*ssed.
 
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