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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I planted 4 rows of 4 different breeds of peas.

Rows #1-3 are normal white flowers.

Row #4 was normal with normal white flowers, now over the last week or so one small section(6-8" wide) the flowers are not white they're a pinky/red like this

Red Pea Flower

I only planted the same breed in each row. I have planted peas for many years but have never planted any that came up with red flowers. None of my neighbors have either(most don't even have gardens). Part of the stalk is reddish too.

In the pic you may be able to see some of my red bean plants. Is it possible that the peas and beans cross-pollinated and that's why these few are reddish?
 

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Wow. You've got the same different colored flower in more than one plant?

If I remember the rules about the birds and the seeds properly, cross-pollinating plants could create hybrid *seeds*, not hybrid plants. If you plant those crossed seeds, the plants they produce would be hybrid and possibly might put out different colored flowers, but of course the flowers of their mother plants wouldn't change from the pollination.

Where did you get the seeds? Is it possible sweet peas seeds were mixed up with garden peas seeds or something?

If I misunderstood and the changed flowers are coming from a single plant then it could be several kinds of things that could cause it...could be a stray hybrid seed but it could also be a sport, which is just a random mutation on the plant itself. In plants, sometimes during the growth cycle in a single plant a particular stem or branch develops completely different from the rest of the plant--they call it a sport. Plant breeders often capitalize on these random anomalous growths and create whole new varieties of plants from it by asexually reproducing it (clone) and selling it under patent.
 

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It is not possible that peas and beans cross-pollinated.

I think the most likely explanation is that your seed had some other seed mixed in, probably from flowering sweet pesa that are planted as ornamental. But if the plants ultimately produce peas at a similar time and size as your other plants and therefore seem to still have a lot in common with them, then I would suspect a mutation of some sort.

Have you ever noticed that some purple and deep pink flowers (such as purple coneflower) have red and purple coloring in their new spring leaves as they emerge from the soil--you also tend to see a bit of the color sometimes streaking the stems. I assume from this that plants that have purple pigments have them throughout the plant. As with fall leaves, the color is only visible when the photosynthetic greens are not obscuring it. So I would say that the stem-coloring you noticed just has to do with the same phenomenon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The different coloured flowers are on more than 1 pea plant, just in the same row. There are white flowers on the same plant as the pinkish ones. There is a small amount of colour bleed but that didn't appear until after the pink flowers did. The plants were never pink until last week and they've been up for 2months. I purchased the seeds from a grocery store here.
 

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Ummm, do you remember those experiments where a carnation would take up food coloring from the water and the color would go into the flower? Really reaching, but maybe something like that?
 
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