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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 3.5 yo has started showing signs of being allergic to peanuts, however, a recent blood test came out negative. Does anyone have experience with this situation and can give advice? Some background:<br><br>
We are vegetarian; my husband and I eat peanut butter every day. Our 3 year old never wanted to try it. We didn't introduce it until she was two years old (we have no history of food allergies in either of our families). She had absolutely NO interest in even trying peanut butter. I thought that was unusual, but feel strongly that she has her own reasons, so I never pushed it. Last summer, I made some peanut butter cookies, thinking that maybe she would try those. She did and liked them, but immediately after eating one she got a red rash around her mouth. The rash didn't seem to bother her, but it scared us and we refused to give her another peanut butter cookie.<br><br>
No more exposure to peanuts until last week: she wanted a piece of dh's Cliff Bar. He gave her about a one-inch piece (there were peanuts in it). She ate it, got a red rash around her mouth and her face, and started complaining that her stomach hurt. She wanted to drink lots and lots of water. She didn't eat anymore cliff Bar (obviously), and she was fine; the rash stayed for about 45 minutes but didn't seem to itch or sting or anything.<br><br>
We took her to our family physician and told her we suspect a peanut allergy. She advised they do the blood test for the allergen. The blood test came back negative. What should we do now?<br><br>
According to <a href="http://www.foodallergy.org" target="_blank">www.foodallergy.org</a>, the likelyhood of a severe reaction to peanuts is small when the (blood) test is negative.<br><br>
Is 3 years old kind of late for a peanut allergy to show up? Might she be allergic to something else? There have only been two incidents of this red rash around the mouth that we know of.
 

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Our dd has a sever allergy to peanuts, and this does show up on her test.<br><br>
However, our allergist was very careful to explain that the gold standard for testing food allergies was to see if the person acted allergic. You can test positive for on skin tests and blood tests but still not be considered allergic if the substance in question doesn't harm you.<br><br>
It stand to reason that the opposite is holding true in your case. Just based on what you have written here, peanuts would seem to be the likely culprit.<br><br>
If you and dh eat it every day, then obviously your dd is not contact or environmentally sensitive to it (as my dd is), so it doesn't seem like you'd have to change the way you currently live. I think it would definitely be prudent to hold off feeding her any peanut products indefinitely. Three is not too old for FA to show up, btw. Three is when the child's immune system sort of starts to "finalize."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, Lory. I really appreciate your reply.<br><br>
Should I go forward with a skin allergy test? I assume it won't be covered by our insurance and will most likely not be cheap ....
 

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I would say no.<br><br>
Skin allergy tests actually innoculate the allergy into dc's skin. It IS a contact with the allergen and I will never do that to my dd again. The whole problem with FA a cascade effect; every exposure makes the next reaction that much worse. If the goal is to defeat the allergy, lack of exposure (in peanut and shellfish allergies anyway) is the ONLY way to do it.<br><br>
The skin test is just an indicator that you need a blood test. I am comfortable paying the money for the blood test thankyouverymuch, if it keeps another reaction away from my child.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
UPDATE: I just learned that the hospital performed the wrong blood test! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"> They didn't test for peanut allergens at all.<br><br>
I don't know what to do .... on one hand, it seems clear that she does NOT have a severe or life-threatening allergy to peanuts. On the other hand, would a blood test (the RIGHT one) actually tell us anything useful? Should we just avoid exposing her to peanuts, inform playdates, etc., and wait a year or two and see how it goes? I hate the idea of taking her back to have more blood drawn again, poor thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Please, help. I have no experience with food allergies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nonconformnmom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">UPDATE: I just learned that the hospital performed the wrong blood test! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"> They didn't test for peanut allergens at all.</div>
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THAT'S INSANE!!! I am so pissed! A less thoughtful parent could have gone and fed the child a snickers.... oh my GOD.<br><br>
I think-- and I am well aware that this is MY OPINION-- that it's better to have the devil you know. She should be tested properly (on their dollar!!!!!!) If she has a peanut allergy you will need to change a few things about your life, not the least of which is having epinephrine on hand at all times.
 

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Peanut allergies (and nut allergies) are the worst and most dangerous. Get the test re-done (on their dollar, since they screwed up).<br><br>
Better to know than not to know.<br><br>
And every exposure can make the allergy worse, so what's just a rash now can turn into full-blown anaphylaxis in a few more exposures.
 

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Definitely get the test done! And as the previous poster said, the reactions get progressively worse.<br><br>
Let us know what you find out!
 
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