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Lisa- I have a French Angora rabbit. She is not a housepet for us- but she easily could be if I wanted to do that. She is very docile and fun to groom- and I use her wool to spin. So anyway- it's a neat bonus... to think of. The angora rabbits are typically more docile than other breeds because they need to be to handled for grooming. It was actually a selling point for me when I saw her at a fiber festival for sale. She was perched on a little platform up off the ground with no cage or anything... just sitting there! I asked the lady if she wasn't afraid that the rabbit would jump and she said that no, she would not jump from a height.

Rabbits need special houseproofing because they can chew through a wire electric or phone in a split second- they can do damage and they can be hurt! if you are looking into rabbits- you should check out the British House Rabbit Society- they REALLY love their bunnies... and although they would probably argue that rabbits are nothing like cats... it would only be because they feel rabbits are so superior to cats!

I would still find out if your brother was allergic to bunnies though. I am very allergic to cats, and also sheep wool- but not to my rabbit or her wool.

Here are some pictures of our "Bianca" My children like to imagine that our farm is actually an animal town, and each animal has a profession... Bianca is the owner of the beauty shop.
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/6...20/praying.jpg
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/6...swerisHALO.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by jocelyndale View Post
A small dog can be paper-trained. If you adopt an older chihuahua or miniature poodle from rescue, you might find one that's just as neurotic and crazy as a cat.
Dog dander is allergenic, of course, but it's not nearly as tenacious or sticky as the feline fel d 1 protein, which can last for over a year. Dog dander is much easier to clean up/filter.

I react to pretty much all critters with hair or feathers. I can't last more than a few minutes in a house with cats (require loads of meds, caffeine, and an open window). And some folks are allergic to pot-bellied pigs. Explore a bit, though. You may find something which works for you.
We were thinking of a dog, I would actually love a dog, but again comes in the angle of both of us working full-time. Even if we could paper-train a small dog, which wouldn't be so bad, wouldn't s/he get depressed being alone for such a long time? I've always heard dogs (for the most part) are more social and are therefore more prone to depression if they're left alone a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·

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Quote:

Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View Post
We were thinking of a dog, I would actually love a dog, but again comes in the angle of both of us working full-time. Even if we could paper-train a small dog, which wouldn't be so bad, wouldn't s/he get depressed being alone for such a long time? I've always heard dogs (for the most part) are more social and are therefore more prone to depression if they're left alone a lot.
It depends on the dog. You could always opt for *two* older dogs who can keep each other company. A good rescue will work with you and figure out which dogs meet your needs (and vice versa).

Our dog was placed with us because we're always home. Hubby works from home, I don't work. We have a dog with separation anxiety issues who needs near constant human companionship. He can be crated, but he spends most of his time cuddled up with one of us. Not all dogs are so needy. The dogs we had when I was growing up were fine with being left for the day. All food/garbage was kept put away, of course, and there were rare accidents, but the dogs were pretty content.
 

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I like ferrets, they're fun and can be litterbox trained. I had 2 growing up. Anna was good and used the litterbox and was a nice sweet ferret. Bailey was a brat, and she pooped on the floor. She was bad
but we were all so busy and no one took much time to train her. My dad eventually gave her to his friend who lived in the country and was single. He trained her to potty outside and scratch on the door to get in. He adored her, and he gave her a better home.

I really like rats, about the only downside is their lifespan (3 years tops). They can be litterbox trained (mine were cage trained, they'd go back to their cage to potty). They come when called, and can learn to do tricks. They don't chew cords like some small animals, they really don't chew much at all. They never bite either (unless abused).

Chinchillas can't really be let to run loose. They chew everything, and they poo everywhere (like someone else said, though, it's hard and dry and vacuums up). If you can get the room completely chin proofed then they are a ton of fun to have running around. They're good pets, I've had them for 9 years, the age of my oldest. They live anywhere from 10 - 20 years. They're not cuddly, but they are friendly. They'll come up to you and interact with you, but they really don't like being picked up and held. My 9 year old is the exception, you can hold him and pet him and carry him around the house all day and he's happy.

I don't think a dog is right for you, they really like having someone around alot. My vote if for a pair (trio?) of rats. Females are more cat-like, more independent and flighty, but still very sweet. Males are lap dogs, they just want to be held and cuddled and scratched under the chin. I miss my rats. I can't get more now because my dachshund would eat them.

Dawn
 
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