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Discussion Starter #1
We've found out DS's multiple food allergies as well as being allergic to cat and dog dander. Of course the food allergies are kind of a whole other barrel of fish so to speak, but we have 2 dogs and 2 cats. As we're eliminating DS's food allergies, we're seeing other reactions arise - like the other night, one of our dogs brushed against him and he didn't have a shirt on and he got hives w/in minutes that then spread beyond the contact site, up his other side, on his neck and he got spots around his mouth. This is the first time we've expressly seen DS react to the dogs, but he definately has gotten hives in the past that would just appear on his cheeks and various parts of his body that we just thought were reactions to his food allergens - so of course now we're rethinking this and seeing that they might have in part been to the animals.<br><br>
Do we have to get rid of our pets?<br><br>
Here's what we've thought of doing around the house:<br>
-get a leather couch<br>
-daily cleaning (dusting, vacuuming-we have hardwoods so it's just a couple rugs-swiffering/sweeping the floors - plus frequent moppings)<br>
-replace the upholstered dining room chairs with hard surface ones<br>
-bathe the dogs weekly w/frequent groomings<br>
-keep DS's room and bathroom pet free<br>
-keep his laundry in those storage bags directly from the dryer so they can't absorb any more dander<br>
-keeping his laundry seperate from the rest<br>
-we don't have any air circulation system in the house (it's an old house) have steam radiator heat and the cat box is as far away from living area as possible<br>
-cats go in and out of the house and the yard, although with winter they will be inside more<br><br>
-also considered trying to make couch pet free, but not sure if I can keep the animals off - the dogs maybe, but not the cats.<br><br>
It's hard because there just seems to constantly be hair and I know dander. We've thought about rehoming the dogs which is absolutely heartbreaking for us, but it's just too much to have to do the cats as well.<br><br>
Any tips or thoughts?
 

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My son is allergic to our dog. We are not rehoming her because she's old and his reaction is not severe.<br><br>
One thing you might look at is your dog's food. Alexander is allergic to corn/dairy/eggs and this is in a LOT of dog food. Since we switched to a dog food that doesn't contain any of those ingredients, his eczema has calmed down some.<br><br>
I think your plan sounds good. Good luck.
 

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Some dog breeds will get drier skin with frequent washing. Dry skin = flaky skin. So be careful there. You may find that a nightly rubdown with a damp towel may be sufficient (also removes some outdoor pollens).<br><br>
We have a standard poodle. Water dogs like poodles have oiler skin and can take more frequent bathing, but even poodles can get flaky with weekly baths. We add extra oil to our dog's food--it does seem to make a difference in how supple his ear leathers and nose are.<br><br>
Cats are a bigger problem. Their allergenic protein (fel d1) comes fromt heir saliva and sebum and coats every single strand of hair. It's a very sticky protein (must be washed off of surfaces) and takes several months to denature. People who own cats carry this protein with them *everywhere*, so his bedroom will still have significant levels of the allergen. You may want to paint the walls with a washable paint and give them a mopdown every so often. A HEPA-standard air filtration unit for his bedroom might be ideal.<br><br>
The radiator heat is a plus. No ductwork!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. DS is actually not very allergic to the cats and much more allergic to the dogs - which is the opposite of most I guess. I also love the idea of the air filter in his room.
 
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