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okay, i've been kind of concerned about DD's language development. it seems a little...weird. she had her first words by 8 months or so (mama, dada, cat, hi). it was obvious she meant them and said them in the correct context, etc.<br><br>
then she just kind of stopped saying much for a couple months. she'd pick up words and would say them 1-10 times and never again (light, dirt, sky, stick, duck, chicken, bye, papa). lots of words, but i could never be SURE she knew them and i wasn't just hearing things, because she didn't say them very much.<br><br>
so fast forward to 13-14 months, she's still REALLY only saying cat. and maybe hot. she's dropped mama. she might be saying dada and dog. so basically in 5-6 months, it seems she hasn't REALLY added any words to her vocabulary. which i think is a little strange. but she seems to understand a TON and can follow commands like "come over here and let me put your shirt on" (she'll come over, put head down and wait for the shirt to go over her head) or "go find checkers the bunny" (she'll leave the room, go find that stuffed animal, and bring him back).<br><br>
she's suddenly in the presence of another toddler a lot who signs (at daycare). and she's picking up a ton of signs, i mean 4-5 a day some days. it's crazy.<br><br>
is this normal? i feel like something is wrong that she started speaking early, clearly understands so much, can learn to sign so quickly and easily, but her spoken vocabulary is so limited. or am i just being paranoid? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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It doesn't sound like a problem to me. My DD is the exact same age as yours--same birthday!--and her language development has also been uneven. Okay, not quite as uneven as your DD's, but she definitely was saying "duck" at 7mo and then totally dropped all speech until she had mastered crawling and cruising, and then she started saying a few words again. Right before she started walking she stopped speaking again, and then after she could walk she started talking again. Weird, but understandable if you think about the brain overload going on in their little heads.<br><br>
Also--I count signing as words. Okay, she isn't speaking them, but she's communicating with a purpose. 4-5 in a DAY is actually pretty amazing, IMO. And if you factor in the complex commands she is understanding, I wouldn't be surprised if your DD is one of those kids who stores things up for a while, then busts out with two word phrases in a couple of months. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I could have made a similar post. I talked to my pedi about it. Your DC is learning 2 languages. By the age of kindergarden your DD will know both the same. If you continue to sign she will use the signs because they are easier. My daughter can say more but she signs it. Now I say Say "more" and she says it (most of the time). It will work itself out. Basically, If you don't teach her anymore signs she will have to say those words to communicate with you. If she can sign the word, she will because it is easier. She will talk it will just be a little later.
 

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sounds totally normal. as another poster said signs are just eaiser to use so - they get used. learning 2 or 3 or 5 languages at the same time does not disrupt learning english. Your LO will get there. no worries.
 

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Sounds normal. I know my DD has had a lot of things she's said once and never again. (she's 17 mo. now.) (Like "Uh-oh, Zaker", her brother's name, at 12 months old. I thought I had an absolute genius connecting words at 12 months old! then I never heard that phrase again. And she didn't say "Zaker' again until about a month ago. And her next two-word phrase came a couple days ago when she said "Hi Daddy")<br><br>
She was/is a child that I usually forgot/forget to sign with because she has picked up so many words so fast.<br><br>
She too is a champion at understanding everything we say. If I say "go get Strawberry, he's in the bedroom" she can go find him easily and has been able to for months. (special pink bear)<br><br>
She is also able to answer any question we ask with "Uh-Huh" or "yeah" or pretty recently she has started shaking her head 'no'. And she is accurate! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> (this is something my son never did so this is cool to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> )
 

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Actually, I have to disagree with the pp who said that a child will choose to sign a word instead of saying it because it is easier and that you should stop teaching signs to encourage speaking. That might be true for some kids and some words, but overall, signing does not inhibit spoken language in children anymore than crawling inhibits walking. Signing IS easier, only until they learn to speak. Once a child is physically and emotionally at a point in their development to speak, they replace their signs with spoken words. Speaking is a much more efficient way to communicate and children will usually choose to speak rather than sign once they have the ability to speak and be understood.<br><br>
All that said, to the OP, your DD sounds like she is doing absolutely fantastic with her language development. Children are able to understand words way beyond what they are able to produce, either with sign language or spoken word. Being able to follow verbal instructions like that at her age is awesome! Remember, signed words count as part of her vocabulary. If she only says two words, but signs 30 correctly, then she knows 32 words! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Animal sounds count towards vocabulary too. I would encourage you to keep signing. If she signs "cat", then say "Yes, that's right! That's a cat!" And when you think she is ready, you can try following that with "Can you say cat?" and see if she tries to vocalize a sound for cat. If not, no worries. She is communicating with you and that makes for a much happier LO. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MamieCole</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11615974"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Actually, I have to disagree with the pp who said that a child will choose to sign a word instead of saying it because it is easier and that you should stop teaching signs to encourage speaking. That might be true for some kids and some words, but overall, signing does not inhibit spoken language in children anymore than crawling inhibits walking. Signing IS easier, only until they learn to speak. Once a child is physically and emotionally at a point in their development to speak, they replace their signs with spoken words. Speaking is a much more efficient way to communicate and children will usually choose to speak rather than sign once they have the ability to speak and be understood.<br><br>
All that said, to the OP, your DD sounds like she is doing absolutely fantastic with her language development. Children are able to understand words way beyond what they are able to produce, either with sign language or spoken word. Being able to follow verbal instructions like that at her age is awesome! Remember, signed words count as part of her vocabulary. If she only says two words, but signs 30 correctly, then she knows 32 words! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Animal sounds count towards vocabulary too. I would encourage you to keep signing. If she signs "cat", then say "Yes, that's right! That's a cat!" And when you think she is ready, you can try following that with "Can you say cat?" and see if she tries to vocalize a sound for cat. If not, no worries. She is communicating with you and that makes for a much happier LO. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"></div>
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I agree.<br><br>
My son got good at sign starting around fourteen months He learned 95 signs before I kind of stopped teaching him more. He'd tell stories in sign. Once he got a hand full of cactus spines in his hand and was understandably upset and crying. He signed "water." I gave him a glass of water, he calmed down, and he let me get the spines out. I never would have thought to calm with water, but he knew what he needed.<br><br>
Just past 2 he started speaking more and the signs went away one by one. Now he sometimes will sign, "milk," to be cute. Sort of, "Remember when I was a baby and talked this way."<br><br>
I'd recommend buying, "Teach your tot to sign." It's the best signing dictionary I found. Not perfect, but pretty good.
 

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Sounds JUST like my DS, who is now 18 months. Started with 5-6 words at 11 mos, then dropped them each slowly. Yet continues to explode in his receptive language, and follows direction just great, and follows all kinds of commands, and answers "yes" and "no" appropriately. Now, he says mama, dada, ball, duck, this and kitty. Along with lots of other repeated sounds that don't always mean the same thing. And, while we haven't taught him a ton of signs, we have taught a few and he makes up his own. He is learning songs now--he can do motions to about 8 verses of "wheels on the bus", plus itsy bitsy spider, and 4-5 other songs.<br><br>
I wrote about this earlier--he is in EI for gross motor stuff, and his therapist said he's doing fine and not to worry for at least 3 more months. She thinks he's quite smart--maybe the same is true of your DD!
 
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