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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I grew up in the mountains living primitively and we heated our home with a wood stove. We always had a surplus of dead trees to take out of the forest for fuel. My husband and I are now looking at buying land and it's likely to have a great deal less trees than I'm used to. So it occured to me - how did pioneers keep a house warm on the prairie?<br><br>
Anyone know?<br><br>
Laura
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sijae</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9851924"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ok, I grew up in the mountains living primitively and we heated our home with a wood stove. We always had a surplus of dead trees to take out of the forest for fuel. My husband and I are now looking at buying land and it's likely to have a great deal less trees than I'm used to. So it occured to me - how did pioneers keep a house warm on the prairie?</div>
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From what I've read, they burned wood if they could get it in the river bottoms, but otherwise used twisted hay (like in "The Long Winter" by Laura Ingalls Wilder) or dried cow or buffalo pats.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/biglaugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="laugh">: You said pats.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mugglemom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9852342"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">From what I've read, they burned wood if they could get it in the river bottoms, but otherwise used twisted hay (like in "The Long Winter" by Laura Ingalls Wilder) or dried cow or buffalo pats.</div>
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I had also read they had to use buffalo or cow 'pats' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> (hadn't heard that term before) when wood was low.<br><br>
That's probably not an option either. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Making hay twists was an act of sheer desperation in Little House books, if I recall.<br><br>
Yes, dung was the standby on the Plains, for the native people and the settlers who came after until trains started shipping in better options, such as coal. Wood can be found, but has to be managed carefully or it gets over-harvested rather quickly.
 

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Thanks for the thoughts! I'm afraid buffalo pats aren't really an option anymore either <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Laura
 

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Oh, I am JUST reading <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Little House on the Prairie</span> to my son...a chapter each night...and Pa has been very busy hauling logs from the creek area.
 
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