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"The belief is that the longer the placenta takes the greater danger of problems with the uterus not contracting back and stopping blood loss."<br><br>
This is apparantly why my midwife wanted me to get my placenta out within 30 minutes or else she'd want to give me a needle. She said it needed to come out soon after birth so she could assess blood loss and make sure I did not suffer too great a blood loss.<br><br>
Now is it just me or does rushing the placenta along put you at a risk for haemorrhage and further blood loss? I thought that if the placenta was left to detach itself, the vessels would close up and the uterus would contract and this would minimalise the risk of blood loss. Breastfeeding aids this stage too.<br><br>
During my birth, I was asked to push the placenta out about 20 minutes after I gave birth, this was right after I got out of the birthing pool, and before I had attempted my first breastfeed since DD was not interested right after birth.<br>
It was hard. I had to push and push without the help of any contractions, and suddenly I felt something pull away from inside me and go "Plop!" out of me really suddenly. I felt a twist, like a pulled muscle or something in my side. I don't think it was from pushing to get the placenta out, i think it was because the placenta was not ready to detach properly yet.<br><br>
So... if the placenta was indeed still partially attached and blood flow was still going to it, I assume it would also be draining through the cord EVEN though the midwife said the cord had stopped pulsing really quickly after DD was born (quicker than was in her experience apparantly it stopped pulsing before DD started breathing.). It took DD about 5 minutes to have her breathing up to par.<br><br>
I think there was a bit of a panic between my mum and the midwife when the cord stopped pulsing so quickly, and my dd took a while to get breathing properly.<br><br>
I am a bit confused here though. I feel that the cord not visibly pulsing any longer was NOT an huge issue. DD was out, taking a few minutes to adjust to the new world etc. I think DD would of started breathing without the suctioning and the oxygen tank but who knows. I also feel that the placenta could of waited for a bit longer. I think that its possible the sudden birth of my placenta put my body into some sort of shock, i was so tired after i birthed the placenta, wanted to lie down, sleep, not move and i definitely did not feel like that right before i birthed the placenta.<br><br>
So input anyone? References to research? I am trying to find if blood and oxygen transfer still occurs even after the cord appears to stop pulsing maybe not on the same level that it does when pulsing but on some level nonetheless? Also there must be oxygen rich blood circling in the baby, that is able to handle not breathing for a couple of minutes after birth. She was breathing within 1-2 minutes just erratically, on and off as she adjusted. I think this is NORMAL but i might be wrong. She also yawned a big yawn!!!<br><br>
I am also trying to find out information about the validity of the belief that there is a risk to not getting the placenta out quick smart.<br><br>
Chip in! I'm still looking on google for info.
 

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There are so many issues here -- I will try to attack them one by one. I am an apprentice midwife and will answer based on my training and experience. I am sure that more experienced midwives might have more to say.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Quickening</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"The belief is that the longer the placenta takes the greater danger of problems with the uterus not contracting back and stopping blood loss."<br><br><br>
This is true. Anything that remains in the uterus and keeps it from clamping down could make the blood loss more serious.<br><br>
This is apparantly why my midwife wanted me to get my placenta out within 30 minutes or else she'd want to give me a needle.<br><br>
Pitocin? Very controversial to give pitocin before the placenta. Manual removal is another possible remedy.<br><br>
She said it needed to come out soon after birth so she could assess blood loss and make sure I did not suffer too great a blood loss.<br><br>
Blood can be hidden behind the placenta, but it will usually make the fundus rise if the placenta has partially detatched and is blocking the cervix. I am guessing that she was concerned about this hidden blood.<br><br>
Now is it just me or does rushing the placenta along put you at a risk for haemorrhage and further blood loss? I thought that if the placenta was left to detach itself, the vessels would close up and the uterus would contract and this would minimalise the risk of blood loss. Breastfeeding aids this stage too.<br><br>
Some studies seem to indicate that hemmorhages are less frequent when the placenta is assisted, but most midwives tend to lean away from the aggressive cord traction that you see OBs do.<br><br>
During my birth, I was asked to push the placenta out about 20 minutes after I gave birth, this was right after I got out of the birthing pool, and before I had attempted my first breastfeed since DD was not interested right after birth.<br>
It was hard. I had to push and push without the help of any contractions, and suddenly I felt something pull away from inside me and go "Plop!" out of me really suddenly. I felt a twist, like a pulled muscle or something in my side. I don't think it was from pushing to get the placenta out, i think it was because the placenta was not ready to detach properly yet.<br><br>
Was your midwife pulling on the cord? If not, it probably detatched on its own.<br><br>
So... if the placenta was indeed still partially attached and blood flow was still going to it, I assume it would also be draining through the cord EVEN though the midwife said the cord had stopped pulsing really quickly after DD was born<br><br>
Nope. The wharton's jelly causes the vessels in the cord to stop the blood flow within minutes.<br><br>
(quicker than was in her experience apparantly it stopped pulsing before DD started breathing.). It took DD about 5 minutes to have her breathing up to par.<br><br>
I think there was a bit of a panic between my mum and the midwife when the cord stopped pulsing so quickly, and my dd took a while to get breathing properly.<br><br>
The midwife was concerned because the babe appeared to not be getting any oxygen from the cord but also was not breathing. Scary stuff.<br><br>
I am a bit confused here though. I feel that the cord not visibly pulsing any longer was NOT an huge issue. DD was out, taking a few minutes to adjust to the new world etc. I think DD would of started breathing without the suctioning and the oxygen tank but who knows.<br><br><br>
It is impossible to know. Some babies really do need a little bit of help. It is not so much the oxygen that makes a difference, but the pressure from the mouth to mouth or resuscitation bag which helps inflate the lungs so that when the baby breathes she gets a good amount of air.<br><br><br>
I also feel that the placenta could of waited for a bit longer. I think that its possible the sudden birth of my placenta put my body into some sort of shock, i was so tired after i birthed the placenta, wanted to lie down, sleep, not move and i definitely did not feel like that right before i birthed the placenta.<br><br>
I don't know about this. Maybe the sensation of your placenta separating so quickly did put your body into a sort of shock.<br><br>
So input anyone? References to research? I am trying to find if blood and oxygen transfer still occurs even after the cord appears to stop pulsing maybe not on the same level that it does when pulsing but on some level nonetheless? Also there must be oxygen rich blood circling in the baby, that is able to handle not breathing for a couple of minutes after birth. She was breathing within 1-2 minutes just erratically, on and off as she adjusted. I think this is NORMAL but i might be wrong. She also yawned a big yawn!!!<br><br><br>
I am also trying to find out information about the validity of the belief that there is a risk to not getting the placenta out quick smart.<br><br>
Chip in! I'm still looking on google for info.</div>
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I will see if I can find any studies.<br><br>
Take care.
 
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