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I know I have posted about placenta retention before but today I was thinking about it. Most of us here often question our concerns with "what would a tribal woman do?" just to get our grounding and figure things out.<br><br>
So what does a tribal woman do in the case of a retained placenta? In "civilized" cultures we have the luxury of getting cozy and having time to wait it out. However, in tribal communities (especially nomadic) they don't always have that option. Especially in areas where animals are a large part of their threat to safety. I can't imagine a tribal woman being able to wait a couple hours to expel a placenta without possibly endangering herself or her baby or the tribe. Do they have lower rates of placental retention because of this? Does nature realize that they are in fact tribal and possibly nomadic and take that into account and make things go smoother?
 

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Hrm.<br><br>
Assuming that they were on the move WHILE she was in labor - I can see them starting to move again, then pausing for a while when the placenta separated and was ready to be expelled.<br><br>
If they were not on the move - ie. stopped for her labor and delivery - then I see them stopping at a 'safe' place, where they could stay for a while longer, if needed.<br><br>
Mind you, this is purely logic talking, not any knowledge of tribal customs.
 

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This goes right along with my theory that labor isn't supposed to be long and drawn out, but quick and efficient. I think we have been brainwashed into believing it is going to be a long painful thing for so long that we now believe it. However in tribal society, they didn't have the luxury for this and would have had to be efficient in birthing. Something I feel we can also attain again if we so desire. I am sure this is why my body works as it does. I am in touch with that "tribal energy" of my past.<br><br>
I think that the tribal mamas probably didn't have retained placenta issues like we see today. I bet it all happened quick and simple. AND I am sure they knew what plants (herbs) to use and had them handy to get the placenta to expell quickly. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> They might have even used this right after birth as a normal part of birth (a preventive of sorts). Just my rambling of ideas. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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When you write about "placental retention" are you talking about intact, whole placentas that don't birth for some time OR retained placental fragments? If you're referring to intact, whole placentas, how long does it need to stay in before you consider it retained?<br><br>
~BV
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bryonyvaughn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8227370"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">When you write about "placental retention" are you talking about intact, whole placentas that don't birth for some time OR retained placental fragments? If you're referring to intact, whole placentas, how long does it need to stay in before you consider it retained?<br><br>
~BV</div>
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Hmmm for the sake of a clear thread lets say retained placenta is the whole palcenta. And to qualify as "retained" let's say anything longer than 30 minutes. I want to say in my other thread someone said a placenta was considered truely retained after 45 minutes-1 hour.
 

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Knowing that retain placenta means "whole, intact placenta retained > 30-60 minutes"...<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OtherMother'n'Madre</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8222575"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So what does a tribal woman do in the case of a retained placenta? In "civilized" cultures we have the luxury of getting cozy and having time to wait it out. However, in tribal communities (especially nomadic) they don't always have that option.</div>
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I don't think retained placenta poses any higher risk to tribal women. Traveling isn't that big an issue IMO as most tribes aren't nomadic and many tribes commonly considered nomadic are actually semi-nomadic, having specific areas tjeu stay different times of year. AFAIK the most nomadic tribes often follow big game (or lead domesticated animals) across grasslands. If there's a specific need to press on like limited food or water, some can follow game and come back for the group or most can move on leaving a smaller group with the mom to catch up later.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">...Especially in areas where animals are a large part of their threat to safety.</td>
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Tribes themselves are predator protection. Most animal attacks on adults are from lone, inexperienced, hungry juveniles in areas with artificially high predator populations triggered by large scale habitat disturbance. A prime example is panther attacks on northern Victoria Island since their population ballooned after large scale clear cutting resulted in temporarily high populations of small animals.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Does nature realize that they are in fact tribal and possibly nomadic and take that into account and make things go smoother?</td>
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I like to think nature, like God, is no respecter of persons. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
For the argument's sake I can say I think tribal women NEEDING a perinatologist wouldn't live to pass on their genes further and therefore, as a population, the tribal women would do better in a tribal environment than women who'd needed and had perinatologists for generations.<br><br>
Frankly I think it takes far more preparation, luck, and hardiness to survive a modern hospital birth unscathed than a tribal birth. Ina May Gaskin learned the Gaskin maneuver from Mayan midwives. I was told she felt bad she couldn't help them when all they wanted to learn from her was what to do when the placenta comes before the baby. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
FWIW if hemorrhaging isn't an issue I'm completely comfortable with hours between the baby and placenta's birth. I have very fast labors (last three combined totaled 19 minutes) and have been told it's common for women like me to stop contracting for a long time after birth and have retained placenta. So long as hemorrhaging isn't an issue, I'm fine with that.<br><br>
~BV
 
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