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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I know I can't be the only one this happens to. My onions and garlic tend to start sprouting in my cabinet and pantry. However, to my surprise, I found an onion last week with about six inches of very healthy looking growth. I couldn't wait to see what it would do if I left it alone, so now there is about one foot of healthy green growth. So, the question is: Can I plant this thing? Should I plant it? I'm not sure how onions reproduce, since the onion itself is the bulb/root. Would anything happen?<br><br>
Like I said, my garlic also sprouts sometimes. Can I plant that? I know that Seeds of Change sells out of garlic quickly, so I wonder if there has to be something special about it for it to produce more garlic.
 

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I planted garlic one year that sprouted in the bin, and it did amazingly well. Same w/ potatoes and onions. The only thing you need to worry about, from what I understand, is if it is not organic produce it may have been treated with a growth retardant (which, if it is sprouting is sort of moot, eh?).
 

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Thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> It's organic! Did you do anything special to it?
 

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Nope! I am queen of the lazy gardeners! :LOL<br><br>
eating potatoes just have less eyes than seed potatoes, so that's the main difference there.<br><br>
Oh, and onions (bulbs in general) grow from seed. they are a real pain IMO to start from seed, and it takes forever, but you can let the onion go to flower/seed and see if you can start them. The flowers are pretty, I think.<br>
Garlic, OTOH, you can split up the cloves. Each one will grow into a head of garlic. You can leave them in for a really long time if you want ( I left mine in for a year, and then missed some digging it up and the next year I found it all!). I am pretty sure you should plant garlic in the fall, but I am not too positive about that. I just stuck mine in the garden when it sprouted (some time in the summer I think) in a spot that was not used for anything. There are also 2 types (soft and hard neck). I heard that soft neck only does well in warmer climates (think Gilroy CA), but I am pretty sure that's the type sold mostly in the stores and the type I planted here in NE PA. Good luck!!
 

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The onion: biennial. Onions bulb their first year and then flower for reproduction the second. The flowers can be really COOL, but the sprout won't produce new onions. I doubt the idea of seeding next year is worth the effort especially since the onion is almost certainly a hybrid. You would be better off enjoying the flowering and picking up a pack of onion seed next year for a couple dollars if you want to harvest veggies.<br><br>
The garlic: it will make bulbs, though usually garlic is planted in the fall or super-early spring to produce well. Garlic is also a super companion plant, though, as it discourages insects and diseases so you might plant it with something else like tomatoes or roses or .... I have surrounded my fruit trees with patches of garlic and chives--and they both return every year. Garlic makes some interesting flowers too BTW.<br><br>
I plant both garlic and onions in the garden if I find them sprouting--I recommend it.
 

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I've been letting my 4 yo plant sprouting spuds and onions along the edge of the compost pile for fun. If they grow, GREAT, if they don't, well, I don't have to move them.:LOL
 

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once, i took a red potato that had sprouted in our pantry and planted it, then promptly forgot about it... my flowers came up and then for some reason they all started dying ~ so i dug around a bit underneath them and came up with......<br><br><br><br>
a handful of baby red potatoes! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/biglaugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="laugh">: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/happytears.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="happytears">:<br><br>
so. yeah. they'll probably grow wherever you throw them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I"ll have to try <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I think I'll let my two year old plant them. She always wants to help, but has been known to be leathal to some plants and seeds we've tried planting. Heck, she's only two! I won't have to worry about her hurting a potato or onion or garlic. Thanks!
 
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